Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

I heard the force of spritely wit,

With strength of reason fir'd,
Thoughts that a muses tongue might fit,

And each bright turn admir’d.
Thus, void of care, my hours have flown,
For ftill I found my heart my own.

I liften’d to the Syrens voice

By magic art improv'd ;
The Syren could not fix my choice,

The song alone I lov'd.
Thus, void of care, my hours have flown,
For still I found

my
heart

my own.

But now, o Love I own thy reign,

I find thee in my heart;
I know, I feel the pleasing pain,

'Twas Chloe threw the dart. Chloe her utmost power has shown, My heart is now no more my own.

I saw, I heard, and felt the fame,

For Chloe smild and spoke;
O Cupid, take another aim,

Or else my heart is broke!
To Chloe let the dart be thrown,
And make her heart no more her own.

[merged small][ocr errors]

SONG XVI.

,

7 HY will Florella, when I gaze,

My ravish'd eyes reprove,
And chide them from the only face

They can behold with love?
To Thun your scorn, and ease my care,

I seek a nymph more kind;
And, while I rove from fair to fair,

Still gentle usage find.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Alas! by some degree of woe

We ev'ry bliss must gain :
The heart can ne'er a transport know,

That never feels a pain.

SONG

XVIII.

BY MATHEW PRIOR ESO

IN

N vain you tell your parting lover,

You wish fair winds may waft him over :
Alas! what winds can happy prove,
That bear me far from what I love ?
Alas! what dangers on the main
Can equal those that I sustain,
From Nlighted vows and cold disdain ?

Be gentle, and in pity chufe
To wish the wildest tempefts loose:
That thrown again upon the coast,
Where first my thipwreck'd heart was loft,
I may once more repeat my pain;
Once more in dying notes complain
Of sighted vows, and cold disdain.

SONG XIX.

you
ease
my

troubled heart,
And by examples prove,
That men unhurt may feel the dart,

And bear the pangs of love.

Why

[ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

Your counsels may my thanks engage,

But not my love controul; Alas! such juleps ne'er afswage

This fever of the soul.

Such to the burning patient give,

When fate approaches nigh,
Tell him that thousands through it live,

While he must by it die.

1

SONG XX.

W Appears in frowns that lovely face ?

HY, Delia, ever when I gaze,

Appears in frowns that lovely face?
Why are these smiles to me denied
That gladden ev'ry heart beside ?
In vain your eyes my

flame reprove; I may despair, but still must love.

1

From sweetest airs I fought relief,
And hop'd from music, cure for grief;
Fool that I was! the thrilling sound
Serv'd only to increase the wound;
I, while for reft I fondly strove,
Forgot that music strengthens love.

1

To

To pleasures of a different kind
Soon undeceiv'd I turn'd my mind;
I fought the fair, the gay, the young,
And dress’d, and play'd, and danc'd, and sung;
Vain joys! too weak my heart to move,
Ah! what are you to her I love ?

When drooping on the bed of pain,
I look'd on every hope as vain;
When pitying friends stood weeping by,
And Deaths pale shade seem'd hovering nigh,
No terror could my flame remove,
Or steal a thought from her I love.

Absence may bring relief, I cried,
And strait the dreadful hope I tried ;
Alas! in vain was ev'ry care ;
Still in my heart I bore my

fair

; Ah! whither, whither shall I rove, To fhun despair, or fly from love ?

SONG XXI.

BY ROBERT WOLSELEY ES le

A A
H! blame me not, if no despair

A passion you inspire can end,
Nor think it ftrange, too charming fair,

If love, like other flames, ascend,

LO

VOL. I.

с

If

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »