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There is one other point connected and to keep the labourer here in helpwith Ireland's prospects, upon which a less poverty, instead of permitting him great prejudice appears to exist-emi- to seek his fortune in other lands ? gration. Men who call themselves We believe that every thinking person patriots allege that we are losing the will agree with us in saying, that emi. stalworth and able-bodied people, and gration is one of the most gratifying that in emigrating to America they features in the improved condition of leave behind them the old, the help- the country; and that its effects will less, and the feeble; a perpetual tax be, and in fact already have been, to upon the industrious members of the empty the poorhouses of the useless community. It is scarcely necessary to portion of the community, and to dimideny so foul an imputation cast upon nish poor-rates considerably. our countrymen. A pious regard for We have endeavoured in the foreparents and children, and even for going pages to take a fair and unbiasmore distant relatives, is one of the sed view of our present condition, and features most strongly marked in the our future prospects. Now that the national character, and ever burns in storm has passed, and the angry elethe peasant's heart with a holy flame, ments have almost spent their fury, which misery and poverty in his own we are able to pause, and contemplate land cannot quench ; which wealth and more dispassionately our fortunes; and prosperity abroad can never extin- is there any reason why we should deguish, nor time nor distance chill. We spair? We have endeavoured to comcan confidently assert, from an inti- bat-would that we could say successmate acquaintance and great expe- fully-some of the absurd prejudices rience among the peasantry of Munster that exist against this country, and to and Connaught, that for every guinea point out some of the unexampled retaken out of the country by the emi.

sources we possess ; partly with a view grant, four or five are returned, either to inspire Trishmen with energy for to bring out the other members of his renewed exertions, and partly with a family, or to relieve the wants of his view to excite the curiosity, and awaaged parents. We have seen upon ken the attention of the English emiseveral occasions £50 sent bome by a grant and capitalist. We felt that this common labourer; and the testimony was the more necessary, owing to the of Father Mathew, before a Committee unfortunate disposition of our counof the House of Commons, is to the trymen, which induces them in too same effect. The following return many cases to magnify and exaggerate lately made by one single firm will place immaterial trifles, not in any manner this beyond doubt :

connected with Ireland's progress and

welfare, and at the same time to dis" Return of Sight-bills on Brown, SHIP- credit and depreciate the things that LEY, AND Co., and the NORTHERN

really belong unto her peace. A great BANK, from the 1st of January, 1847,

storm has swept over the face of the to the 31st December, 1847.

land. We have seen names connected

with the brightest era of Irish nationalia “ 694 at 1l.; 1477 at 21. ; 1058 at 31. ; 1170 at 41. ; 1108 at 51.; 614 at 61. ;

ty blotted from out the things that be.

We have seen nobles and maidens of 162 at 71. ; 260 at 81.; 99 at 91.; 555 at 101. ; 57 at lll.; 108 at 121.; 50 at 131.; gentle blood obliged to leave their 40 at 141. ; 80 at 15l. ; 49 at 161. ; 26 at homes,-gorgeous as the habitation of 171. ; 40 at 181. ; 20 at 191. ; 332 at 201.; the mote (that dwelleth in the sun36 at 211.; 26 at 221. ; 22 at 231. ; 21 at beam),—and now poor and friendless 241. ; 106 at 25l. ; 23 at 261. ; 20 at 271. ; on a foreign shore ; and we have seen 22 at 28!.; 10 at 291.; 107 at 301. Num. in countless multitudesber of bills 8,292. Total amount 54,4221. Deducting the bills drawn upon other places, this left a balance in favour of The mournful peasant lead his humble band." Ireland of 28,7471."

These changes, in a great measure We would put it to any candid man effected by legislation, and accompawhether he really believes that emigra- nied with so great an amount of human tion does impoverish the country; or suffering, can only be justified on the even if it did, whether it would be just plea that they were necessary for the to adopt any measure to discourage it, future regeneration of Ireland. Per

"Scourged by famine from the smiling land,

haps they were wise and well, but still degree, succeeded, and that many a they were “not the less a pain ;" and " Saxon,” who might have exiled him. how sad indeed will it be if all these self in the Antipodes, far from all be evils shall have been endured, and if loved and cared for on earth, will now, no commensurate advantage shall be ere he does so, visit Ireland, and exafound to follow! It is because we are mine and judge for himself. We proconvinced that our future destinies mise him if he comes-not as a stranger hinge at the present moment upon

the to view the nakedness of the land not infusion of new capital, enterprise, and as an inspector of poor relief or famine, vigour into the inane and sickly frame to fatten upon our miseries_but as a of Irish society, and that we stand in brother, to link his fate with our coun. need, not of vaunting patriots, orators, try, and to blend his destinies with and heroes, but of patient, industrious, ours, a generous welcome, and all the calculating utilitarians, that we have blessings of a warm-hearted and gratestriven particularly to point out to the ful people. Here, amidst all the exintelligent capitalist the advantages quisite variety of scenery with wbich our country offers, with an anxious de heaven has adorned our isle, and sire, at the same time, to enlist in our amidst the pure beauties of nature, he favour every patriotic Irishman for so will be best able to preserve his health good a work; the more so as we know and spirits, and develope all the enerthat there is no country in the world gies of body and mind. What are the so disparaged by its own inhabitants events of the last few years ? Crime as Ireland, particularly by the section of has almost ceased, the poor-rate is de its people in most constant communi- creasing, civilisation is spreading, education with the English–the absentees, cation is advancing, our manufactures who having become apostates to their are making gigantic strides, our rich own fatherland, hate it as only apos. mines are unappropriated, and our lands tates can hate.

ready to yield their grateful produce; We cannot expect that the fore capital only is wanting. Is ours, then, going observations have been sufficient a declining country ? is our star on to animate the weak and desponding, the wane ? Certainly not; everything or to deter the parties personally in is such as to inspire confidence in those terested in the perpetuation of our who can discern the signs of the times; misfortunes and misery from future ef and we feel assured that the patience forts to aggravate, by false alarms, with which we have endured past sufpresent suffering ; nor can we expect ferings will not be without its reward, that we have been so fortunate as to and that the time is not far off when banish all the anti-Irish prejudices en " The liquid drops of tears that we have shed tertained abroad for so long a period ;

Shall come again transform'd to orient pearls; but we do hope that we have, in some

Advaninging their loss with interest,
And tenfold double guin of happiness."

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FRUITS AND FLOWERS-A SYMPOSIUM IN SUMMER. JULY-A TOXOPHOLITE

PICTURE-SONNETS BY THE SAD WAVE-A STORM AT SEA-TO AN EBBING
RIVER-THE ROSES, A SONG FOR THE PHILOSOPHICAL-THE FEAST OF TABER-
NACLES-TIE SALLY FROM SALERNO-SIR RAINULF's HexcHMAN-AN IDIL OP
Mosch08—THE WISA; OR, TUE FALL OF THE STAR-TIE ORPHAN GIRL

127

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CHATTERTON-A STORY OF THE YEAR 1770. CHAPTER II.-THE ATTORNEY'S

APPRENTICE OF BRISTOL CuAPTER III.-FEMALE FRIENDS, AND A JOURNEY
TO LONDON

178

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MAURICE TIERNAY, TIE SOLDIER OF FORTUNE. CHAPTER XL.-" TUR

CHATEAU OF ETTENU EIM." CHAPTER XLI.-AN “ ORDINARY" ACQUAINTANCK.
CHAPTER XLII.-THE "COUNT DE MAUREPAS," ALIAS —

206

WARM WATER VERSUS COLD; OR, A VISIT TO WARMBRUSN IN PRUSSIAN AND

GRÆFENBERG IN AUSTRIAN SILESIA. PART I, .

223

.

IRISU RIVERS.-NO. VIII. SPENSER'S STREAMS-THE MULLA AND ALLO

233

DUBLIN

JAMES MGLASHAN, 50 UPPER SACKVILLE-ST.

WM. S. ORR AND CO., LONDON AND LIVERPOOL.

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS,

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SCENE. — A Villa at Dalkey, overlooking the Sea. T'ime, Evening: The

Moon in her third quarter. POPLAR, SLINGSBY, and BISHOP are discovered sitting amid the debris of fruit and flasks ; in the midst of the table stands " the red leather box."

BISHOP.—Throw open the window, Anthony, and let us breathe the fresh air of the evening

Poplar—(Rises and opens the window). Heavens! what a glorious twilight ! What piles of clouds in the west, still blushing like coy beauties from the recent kissings of the Sun's rays, and now paling timidly with a sense of shame, and tearful, withal, as if sorrowing for the flight of the day god. See the haze on the placid sea, and the tiny silver ripples just heaving to the white moonshine.

BISHOP.—By the nine muses thou art growing poetical, dear Anthony. Well, well, I often warned you what would come of grog and cigars.

SLINGSBY.–Tush, tush, Jack, let the man have his way. Nature is working in him and will out. Go on, Anthony.

POPLAR.–See how sweetly pensive sails the dwindling moon in the wide expanse of heaven's hazy blue; and you can trace the dim outline of her dusky orbit where the sun's rays fall not on it, like the shadowy tracery of past joys which memory leaves on the brain. Is not the salt breeze from the sea delicious? Hark! to the muffled dash of the long low wave upon the rocky strand, and the plash of the oars of the home-wending fisherman's skiff. Beautiful, beautiful, is all this tranquil world, when the strife and struggle of busy day is passed from her !

BISHOP.—The man going clean daft. A song, a song, Jonathan, if you would not have me apply to the Chancellor for a writ de lunatico inquirendo."

SLINGSBY.—Song of mine shalt thou not have this night, Jack. There are other spirits that shall minister to our delectation. Come, dear Anthony, see what thou hast got for us in thy casket.

POPLAR.- Reach me over yonder box, Jack, and I will give thee that which shall content thy heart. (POPLAR opens the box and draws forth at a venture., Now may fortune favor me. Ha! said I not soothly. Here is something to the very matter. Are we not now in the midst of bright and beautiful July? Listen, then, how one of the bards of Maga celebrates it for us. (Reads) :

VOL. XXXVIII.-NO. CCXXIV.

K

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