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Evening Schools.-An evening school was opened, Aug. 1856, Ahira Holmes, principal. James Denman, John Swett, and John Hammill volunteered their services as assistants until the school was established. This school continued with from 100 to 200 pupils until 1869, when John Swett was elected Principal.

The school was then regularly graded, was opened in the Lincoln building, was made free to adults, and in three months the attendance swelled to 900. A commercial class and an industrial drawing class were soon organized. In 1871, Mr. Swett resigned and was succeeded by William A. Robertson, the present Principal.

6. HISTORICAL STATISTICAL TABLE OF THE SAN FRAN

CISCO SCHOOLS, 1852–76.

YEARS.

TOTAL EXPENSE.

AVERAGE NUMBER
DAILY

OF
ATTENDANCE. TEACHERS.

15

16

19

29

61

60

67

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75

68

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73

82

94

1852 .... 1853.... 1854 1855 1856. 1857.... 1858.. 1859.... 1860 1861 ... 1862.. 1863... 1864. 1865.... 1866.... 1867... 1868... 1869.... 1870.. 1871 .. 1872 1873. 1874.. 1875.

$23,125 00

35,040 00 159,219 00 136,580 00 125,064 00

92,955 00 104,808 00 134,731 00 156,407 00 158,855 00 134,567 00 178,929 00 228,411 00 346,862 00 361,668 00 507,822 00 415,839 00 400,842 00 526,625 90 705,116 00 668,262 00 611,818 00 689,022 00 707,445 36

445 1,182 1,272 1,638 2,516 2,155 2,521 2,829 2,837 3,377 3,786 4,389 5,229 6,718 8,131 10,177 11,871 13,113 15,394 16,978 18,272 18,530 19,434 21,014

108

138

206

253

285

326

371

416

480

506

510

552

Total..

$7,610,043 36

7. SPECIAL SCHOOL STATISTICS, SAN FRANCISCO.

Estimated population, 1875.
Number of census children, 5 to 17
Number of pupils enrolled in public schools
Average daily attendance ..
Number attending private and church schools.
Enrolled in High Schools..

234,000 37,583 31,128 21,014 .6,094 ...702

Enrolled in Grammar Schools.

Primary Schools.

Evening Schools.
Teachers (men, 63; women, 447)--total.
Whole number of classes.
Expenditures.
Tax roll of the city..
Estimated value of school property.

....6,055

22,158 2,213 ..510

.449 $700,147 $264,000,000

$3,367,000

CLASSES AND TEACHERS.

17

108

Number of classes in the High Schools...
Number of Grammar Classes (average, 50 each)
Number of Primary Classes (average, 55 each).
Number of Evening Classes (average, 40 each).

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Total number of classes.

449

129

Total number of Principals of different schools.

47 High Schools, 2; Grammar Schools, 12; Mixed Schools,

9; Primary Schools, 24. Number of Principals of schools not required to teach a class.. 25

Males, 12; Females, 13. Number of Vice-Principals..

16 Males, 8; Females, 8. Number of teachers in High Schools.

22 Males, 10; Females, 12. Number of teachers in Grammar Schools.

Males, 27; Females, 102.
Number of teachers in Primary Schools..

325 Male, 1; Females, 324. Number of teachers in Evening Schools..

23 Males, 20; Females, 3. Number of teachers of German and French.

22 German, 13; French, 9. Teacher of Latin and Greek...

1 Number of special teachers..

11 Music, 6; Drawing, 5.

Total number of teachers.

510

PART II.

1. TEACHERS' CONVENTIONS AND INSTITUTES.

I. FIRST STATE TEACHERS' CONVENTION.

The first State Teachers' Convention, called by State Superintendent Hubbs, was held in the city of San Francisco, Dec. 26-28, 1854, Supt. Hubbs presiding. No roll of members appears on the manuscript minutes, but about 100 teachers, and other persons interested in school matters, from various parts of the State, were in attendance.

Col. E. D. Baker was introduced to the convention, and made an eloquent address on the subject of general education, and painted in glowing language the future of California. Remarks were made by Rev. M. C. Briggs, Rev. John E. Benton, and Dr. Gibbons. Dr. Winslow read an address on the “Use of the Bible in Public Schools,” and the Rev. S. V. Blakesly one on “Phonography in School.”

On the second day J. M. Buffington, of Stockton, made a report, which was adopted, recommending the appointment of a committee of seven, to make immediate arrangements for organizing a State Institute. John S. Hittell introduced a resolution, which was adopted, providing for the appointment of a committee to memorialize the Legislature on the subject of libraries. Mr. Freeman Gates moved the appointment of a committee to report a State series of text-books. Essays on the management of primary schools were read by Mrs. Hazleton, Mrs. Clapp, Mrs. Williams, Miss Allyn, and Miss Austin. Mr. Wells, of Sacramento, read an essay on the “General Management of Schools," and Mr. Phillips, of Stockton, on the “Free School System.” Mr. Buffington, of Stockton, delivered an address on "Education," and Sherman Day spoke on the same subject. John Swett read an address on the subject of “Elocution in the Common Schools," and J. C. Morrill an able address on "Unclassified Schools.

The proceedings of this Convention were characterized by a good degree of interest; the essays and addresses were generally able; but no improvements in school law worth mentioning were recommended, and the convention left no mark on the educational history of the State.

2. SECOND STATE TEACHERS' CONVENTION.

The second State Teachers' Convention met at Benicia, Aug. 12, 1856, Supt. Hubbs presiding.

William Sherman, from the Committee on Text-Books, reported a series recommended for general use.

Gen. Wool being introduced to the meeting, made a brief speech, in which he complimented the ladies, and said that all the greatest men owed their education and the formation of their characters principally to women.

Mr. Morrill offered a resolution in favor of reading the Bible in the public schools, which, after an exciting debate, was tabled by 21 to 16.

Essays were read by Mr. J. C. Morrill, on “Corporal Punishment;" by Mr. Monroe, on “Thorough Training;" by Mr. Wells, on “Course of Studies;” and by Mrs. Hill, on the Mission of Females as Teachers."

The convention was not largely attended, only 60 members being present. No important measures were acted on, and the convention gave no renewed impulse to the interests of education.

3. FIRST STATE INSTITUTE.

The first State Institute, called by State Superintendent Moulder, met in the city of San Francisco, May 27, 1861, and continued in session five days, with a total attendance of 250 members. The Legislature of the previous year had made an appropriation of $3000 for the purpose of aiding State Institutes.

In his address, Mr. Moulder stated the plan of proceedings, which devoted the morning sessions to regular Institute lectures, and the afternoon sessions to a convention; that the adop

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