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map before the Board about the Ellis sale, was the small map, showing the three small pieces of land conveyed to Ellis; that the Attorney-General showed an unwillingness to attend the Board; said it was none of his business. He further stated that when thé sale was made to Ellis, he had no idea they were conveying to him what it has since transpired they did convey by those deeds.

Ex-Attorney-General Love testified that he never knew of the Act making the grant to the city of Mission Creek; that he considered Ellis' claim the merest nonsense, and refused to sign those deeds and many others.

Ex-Surveyor-General Gardner swears that he never saw the map “Exhibit A," until after the Ellis sales were denounced in the papers; that the only map he saw was a small one, which he requested Mr. Russell to bring to Sacramento with the deeds, but it was not done, and he signed the deeds without reading them or knowing their contents; and had he known their contents he would not have signed them ; that he was deceived, but by whom, he does not know; that he knew nothing of the Act making the grant to the city; that he had no idea they were conveying to Ellis any part of Mission Creek, nor anything else, save two or three small triangular pieces of land represented on the small map. He further stated that he never told Governor Pacheco that the deeds were all right.

The Ellis deeds (copies of them) are herewith presented; one contains thirteen pages and the other fourteen. And your committee think it a little strange that these Commissioners should sign deeds as voluminous as these were without reading them, when they all seemed to be sure that the award to Ellis was of two or three small triangular pieces of land. Prudent men, it does seem to us, would feel curious to know how it could take two voluminous deeds to convey three small pieces of land.

It further appears to the committee that all these officers were grossly negligent in this matter, and took no care to see what they were doing In conclusion, your committee submit the following:

First—That the Ellis deeds convey no title to any part of Mission Creek or old Channel street, for the reason that by a legislative grant the title to the same was conveyed to the City and County of San Francisco prior to the organization of the Board, and it was not in the power of the Tide Land Board to convey it to Ellis.

SecondThat the deeds to blocks forty-nine, fifty-nine, and sixty conveyed no title, as said lands were neither tide lands nor salt marsh lands, and not in the power of the Board to convey.

ThirdThat the testimony taken, together with the deeds, should be turned over to the Attorney-General of the State, and that he be directed to take such action in the premises as he may be advised is proper to remove the cloud of the Ellis deeds from Mission Creek, and also from Mission blocks forty-nine, fifty-nine, and sixty; and in furtherance of that idea, we herewith present a resolution. All of which is most respectfully submitted.

MCCOPPIN, Chairman.
LAINE,
LINDSEY,

EVANS,
28

O'CONNOR.

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REPORT.

Mr. SPEAKER: Your Committee on Education, having visited the State University, State Normal School, and Deaf and Dumb Asylum, beg leave to submit the following report:

THE STATE UNIVERSITY.

We first visited the State University, at Berkeley. We found President Le Conte industriously engaged in the discharge of his duties. After a cordial reception, he proceeded to conduct us on our tour of inspection. We found the College of Letters in an excellent and flourishing condition, and take pleasure in commending the faculty for their ability and enterprise in conducting and promoting that department. The class-rooms are admirably arranged, and well ventilated; but many of them are too small to properly accommodate the large number of pupils now occupying them. This is especially true of the assembly chamber, in which the pupils congregate to attend lectures, entertainments, commencement exercises, etc. When the building was erected the patronage of the College was comparatively small, and its dimensions were ample for all requirements; since that time, its growing usefulness and increasing popularity have. drawn to it a far greater number than that for which it was at first intended. As the question of furnishing accommodations properly belongs to the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, we leave all recommendations to them. We next visited the College of Agriculture. In this building we found the University library. It occupies about one-fourth of the first floor, and yet it is filled to inconvenience. Immediately above it is the museum, occupying a room of about the same size with that of the library. It contains assorted specimens of the various minerals of the earth, together with a large number of curious fossils, and interesting relics of extinct animals; and, also, specimens of rude works of art executed by human hands in ages past. The upper story of the building is used almost exclusively as a store-house for an unassorted mass of mineral specimens and relics. The remainder of the building is occupied principally by the chemical laboratories, which are extensive, and well arranged, and two lecture-rooms, one of which is devoted exclusively to the use of the Professor of Agriculture.

So far as the space allowed to those engaged in studying the science corresponding with the name of the college is concerned, we believe

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THE DEAF, DUMB, AND BLIND ASYLUM.

We next visited the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind Asylum. We found Professor Wilkinson and his assistants at their posts, industriously discharging their arduous duties. We found the institution in good condition, considering the overcrowded state of the present building. We found the students in good spirits, apparently as happy and contented as it is possible for those afflicted as they are, to be. We were greatly surprised by the wonderful progress made by the students in the various branches of learning, and take great pleasure in commending the systems of teaching adopted and pursued by the Professors with so much success; and we especially commend the manner in which the pupils have been taught the higher branches of learning, believing, as we do, that the communication of a knowledge of these branches will serve to open up a world of thought to the minds of those unfortunates which may serve to relieve them, in a measure, from the terrible consequences of their affliction. Wé found nothing to deprecate in the management of this institution, and have therefore nothing to recommend (in the way of change) concerning it. The temporary building erected to supply the place of the one destroyed by fire is entirely too small for present requirements; and we therefore join with the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds in recommending a liberal appropriation for the erection .of suitable buildings for the accommodation of the inmates.

THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL.

that it would be sufficient, provided that the pupils were required to apply the theories therein learned to actual practice on the college grounds and farm. The appearance of the grounds, however, proves that if the idea of combining the teaching of the theory of agriculture with actual practice in it ever entered the minds of those in charge, it was either dismissed without trial ; or if tried, proved a disastrous failure. No perceptible effort has yet been made to beautify the grounds in any way; they still slumber beneath the mantle which nature has spread over them. True, there is a little forest of young trees growing up in front of the buildings, but they are scattered promiscuously about, without any regularity of arrangement, and apparently, “without master or keeper, only Him that made them and gave them that home. The farming there consists of the cultivation, by hired labor (not students) of the spots of land on which either trees were not planted, or, if planted, did not grow. We believe that this kind of backwoods farming, while it may be less troublesome than the more approved plans, is not calculated to inspire students with any profound respect or love' for agricultural pursuits. In justice to the managment, however, we take pleasure in stating that they are putting the horticultural department of this college in good shape, and are preparing it for practical use. Our investigations satisfied us that, while but little has been done in the way of putting the College of Mining and Mechanic Arts in practical operation, the fault does not rest with the managment, since the State has not made any provision for erecting the necessary buildings. Considering the overcrowded condition of the building known as the College of Agriculture, and the consequent crippling of the usefulness of that institution, and also the necessity of fostering and encouraging the study of those sciences and arts, a knowledge of which will enable the rising generation to develop and utilize the resources of our country most successfully, we join with the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds in recommending that steps be taken to construct a suitable College of Mining and Mechanic Arts.

During our stay we had the pleasure of witnessing the students going through the evolutions of the regimental drill. They appeared to fine advantage, and executed the orders of their commanding officers with more than ordinary promptness and accuracy. If the general discipline of the University compares at all favorably with the conduct of the students on the occasion of our visit (and we have no reason to believe that it does not), the President and Faculty have every reason to feel proud of our California boys, and also of their own success as disciplinarians. When the Agricultural,

Mechanical, and Mining departments take the position which they were originally intended to occupy, our University will be a pride to California, and a model for older and wealthier States; but until they do, the merit, the worth, nay the unqualified superiority of her classical and literary departments cannot atone for wasted opportunities and willful sluggishness in the departments, of practical science and art. As a full and complete report of all matters connected with the University has been made by the Regents, and placed upon the desks of the members of both Houses of the Legislature, we respectfully refer you to it for all details connected with the management of the institution, and confine ourselves to general considerations.

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Our next and last visit was to the State Normal School at San José. Mr. Ryland, one of the Normal School Trustees, kindly escorted us to the school, where we found Professor Allen, the Principal, at his post. After a cordial reception, we proceeded to visit the class-rooms. We found them all in excellent order, and if we may be permitted to judge from the brief examinations which our limited time allowed us to make, we believe that the pupils are making rapid progress in their studies. We feel constrained to remark here, that if appearances be any index to worth of character, the people of California may well feel proud of the large number of promising young ladies and gentlemen, who are preparing themselves for the important office of developing and training the intellects of the children, the future citizens and rulers of this great State. As in the case of the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind Asylum, we have no recommendation to make in regard to the management of the State Normal Schol;, but as its efficiency has been somewhat crippled in consequence of an inadequate appropriation for the past two years, and as the number of pupils has increased twenty-five per cent. during that time, we recommend that an appropriation of fifty thousand dollars be made for its support during the two fiscal years ensuing.

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REPORT

A

OF THE

ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE,

TO WHICH WAS REFERRED THE

MEMORIAL OF THE CALIFORNIA WOMAN SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION,

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