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will cease.

P. E, DOUGHERTY, Freight Auditor. A. A. BEAN, Superintendent. ered to other carriers, or the consignees, the responsibility of this company as common carrier company for transportation has been carried to the station on this road where it is to be delivAU ratas payable in United States gold coin or its equivalent. After property delivered to the special rates. This company reserves the right to make at its pleasure, any change in the same. This tariff and its conditions, instructions, and classification, supersedes all others and alr

Approved':

PETER Donaux, President.

May 10th, 1875. San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad Freight Tariff, to take effect

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San Francisco.

San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad Freight Tarif, to take effect. May 10th, 1875, and now in use.

Freight charger must not exëeed fifteen (15) cents per ton per mile in any case, except that no lot of freight must be taken for less than fifty (50) cents. All rates payable in U. S.

gold coin or its equivalent.

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RULES AND REGULATIONS.
NO ARTICLE However small will be takén any distance for less than 50 cents.

RELEASE, uter be taken for shipment of stock, furniture, hay, and all goods going to
FREIGHT TO BE DELIVERED åt stations where the company has no agent must be prepaid prepaid stations.
and released..

ALL FREIGHT shipped in bulk or in car loads, "at car load rates, must be loaded and
PERIŠRABLE ARTICLES must be prepaid or not taken Stations marked with stars are unloaded by the owners or at their expense, and within 24 hours after its arrival at point of
prepaid stations.

destination it must be ünloaded, or à charge of $3 per day will be made for use of car.'
This company will not be responsible for any decay of injury of perishable articles by A WAY BILL must be sent with each loaded car. WEIGHT8 to be entered on way-bills in
heat, etc., nor for loss, damage, or injury arising from delay or stoppage, nor for damage or
shortage to hidden contents, nor for leakage, bursting, or by improper packing.

For all height fexcept live stock and grain) spipped IR car load lots under A B C, a charge of $3 will be made for loading or unloading at San Francisco.
Classincation dated September 1st, 1874, remains unchanged.

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people on the line of that road have become greatly alarmed in regard to this matter, and I was requested by them to come here and make this statement. Two years ago this spring, farmers from Dixon, Davisville, Woodland and Vacayille, held a meeting, and, thinking the rates charged by the railroad to be too high, sent a del egation to San Franciscoto try and get them lowered. They were lowered, and are satisfactory to all the parties concerned. Since that time there has been no complaint from them. They have built large warehouses at Woodland, Davisville, and Dixon, for the storing of grain, and are very content to pay the rates asked of them. They are becoming alarmed for fear this bill may pass, thus ruining their chances of prosperity for some time to come, being fully satisfied that if the bill becomes a law the railroad cannot be worked.

Mr. Farley-Who requested you to come here?
A.-Business men and farmers of the two counties.
Q. How many?

A.- Nearly all the grain shippers and a great number of farmers. It is the town and country talk at the present time, and all condemn the bill. I will state that I have not conversed with any man connected with the railroad company on this subject, and was not requested to come here by the railroad company. I never had anything in common with the company other than shipping my goods over the road. I have not been nor. am I in their employ. My standing in the community is well known, and I refer you to Senators Metune and Hilborn, both from my county

.. Mr. Cohen then reiterated his statement that Stubb's figures were incorrect, and asked the committee to examine the authorities already submitted by him. He repeated his history of the California Pacific Railroad, and his statement that the road could be built for $2,500,000; that the first managers were dishonest and corrupt, and that through their dishonest practices it had been sunk so deeply in debt that the sum now was nearly $12,000,000. Roads like that of Mr. Donahue were profitable, for there was a profit, even though it was expended in building and equipping more road. All that was invested was not the less gain, because it went towards building more road.

Mr. Donahue. I understood Mr. Cohen to state that the road of which I am President had paid no profit, according to my statement. I said not so. I said that I had never got a dollar from it, but that, besides all the earnings of the road, I had put in it all my income from other sources.

Mr. Farley-Have you received any aid from the Government in constructing your road?

A.- No, sir; not a cent-never. It is most astonishing to me to find Mr. Cohen here making any statement in reference to my road or any other railroad, from the fact that he himself has been in the business from an early day, and while in it I believe got all he could from the people for fares and freights-squeezed out the last cent. He sold his railroad and ferry to the Central Pacific Railroad Company, and I always supposed that the trade was mutually agreeable, until I learned in conversation with the gentleman himself that he was not satisfied. I said, "It is very strange if you have remained in the employ of the Central Pacific Railroad Company ever since. You have run together for a long time, and although I don't know what

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TESTIMONY OF D. B. HOUGH.

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D. B. HOUGH, lumber dealer at Dixon, Solano County, was sworn, and made the following statement:

I wish to say a few words in regard to the Archer bill and the California Pacific Railroad.' Since the Archer bill has passed the Assembly it has been the all-absorbing topic of conversation throughout Yolo and Solano Counties, counties through which the California Pacific road runs. The farmers and business men have read and examined the bill, and they thoroughly understand the effect it must have upon the road. Of course you will readily perceive, by reading the seventh and eighth classes mentioned in the bill, that no road could be operated through that country, where the principal business is the transportation of grain and lumber. My business is shipping lumber, and the bill will reduce the freights on the article from two dollars to one dollar per ton for carriage to Vallejo from Dixon, a distance of thirty-nine miles. On that part of the road there is a heavy grade just this side of Vallejo-a grade so steep that going east one locomotive can pull but eleven cars, going west fourteen cars. The present prices suit me, and I do not ask à change. The

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position you bcoupy, I know that you have certainly officiated for them in very important matters". I wish to staté here that I was one of the constructors of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and built the first sighty miles My partners were Messrs. Newhalt and Poll bemus. Inducements were held out to us to build the road, and we commended. Aid we were to receive from San José we never saw, and built the first eighty miles ourselves. We then sold out to the Central Pacific Railroad Company, and Mr. Cohen officiated in the transaction for the railroad company

Mr. Cohen-Didn't I buy the road for the Central Pacific as cheap as I could get it? 14. M. Donahue I guess you did. As the gentleman assails the enterprise in which I have been engaged so long; I feel myself justified in showing that this is a matter of dispute, of grievance, between the Central Pacific Railroad and Cohen.

Mr. Farley. That is not a proper

Mr. Donahue-I think it is. This is a work to which I am giving may full attention, and I am pressing it now with all diligence, and I don't want to be injured in my rights of property and profit because of the malice existing between this individual and the company. He is prosecuting this bill purely from malice, in the name of the people of the State te

Mr. Farley-As I said before, this is not a proper subject for us to consider.

Mr. Donahue-It affects me, I say.' This persecution of railroad interests affects me directly, and I don't want to be made to suffer because there is a disagreement between Cohen and the company

Mr. Cohen I said nothing improper of Mr. Donahue. I merely spoke of his road in connection with gross earnings as compared to profits.

Mo. FarleyI will permit no more diseussion on the subject. It is not proper for this time and place. * Mr. Cohen-That is quite proper. My relations with the Central Pacific Railroad Company are not in place here. The company have selected another tribunal, and I will meet them there or elsewhere. My motives are not to be considered in determining this question. I ask the committee to determine whether the measure is just or not, and that alone. The motives of the man who presses a righteous bill should not affeet that bill in the least:

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SCHEDULE A.

Comparison of lumber rates (in dollars per car load) on the Sacramento,

Visalia, and Oregon Divisions of the Central Pacific Railroad.

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