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form of inflammation affecting different tissues, or is merely a form of inflammation of the skin. In a practical point of view, also, it must be allowed to possess great merit; and it must be admitted that, while the Author has considered carefully the pathological and doctrinal points-he has not been less solicitous to establish their bearings in improving the treatment of the disease."--Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, No. 154.

“ The work merits approbation. It contains all the evidence that can be adduced to render probable the similarity of nature of all these important affections, and thus gives a guidance which, in their investigation and treatment, cannot fail, if cautiously followed, to lead to good; and on the subject of Erysipelas, commonly so called, it supplies all the information which is scattered through a vast number of records, many of which are scarcely accessible to the majority of readers."--Medical Gazette.

“Altogether we consider that Mr. Nunneley has done good service to the Profession by the production of this work."-Provincial Medical and Surgical Journal.

“We have great pleasure in recommending Mr. Nunneley's book to our readers; it displays great talent and zeal; it is well written, abounding in learning and sound practical directions."-Dublin Journal of Medical Science.

“We confess that, after an attentive examination of Mr.Nunneley's remarks upon the different affections just enumerated, and which he would introduce into the family of Erysipelas, we cannot refrain from admitting the very strong presumptive evidence, at least, which he affords on the propriety of giving to the term a wider latitude than has yet been usually conceded to it.

" Mr. Nunneley's Treatise is a sensible and well-written Essay. We may not probably consent to all his opinions, as to the propriety of extending the term Erysipelas so far as he has done: he has, however, made out a strong case in favour of the views he advocates, and he is entitled to the somewhat rare praise of having questioned and criticised the opinions of others dispassionately and justly."-Medical Quarterly Review.

"We cannot shut the volume before us without recommending it to our medical friends. It contains much information, and is marked by much good sense. The Practitioner will find in it that which will stand him in stead in practice."--Medico-Chirurgical Review.

" In conclusion, we beg to recommend the Work to the Profession, as being one of great value, not only for the originality of the matter, but for the immense number of references to the best authorities on the subject."-Retrospect of Practical Medicine.

XLII.
Foolscap 8vo., Price 4s., Cloth Boards.
ANATOMICAL TABLES ;

CONTAINING
CONCISE DESCRIPTIONS OF THE MUSCLES, LIGAMENTS, FASCIÆ,

BLOOD VESSELS, AND NERVES.
INTENDED FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS.

CONTA

XLIII.
BY MR. W. OSBURN, JUN.

Demy 8vo., Price 10s., Cloth Boards, DOCTRINAL ERRORS OF THE APOSTOLICAL AND

EARLY FATHERS,

BY WILLIAM OSBURN, JUN. The celebrated author of “Spiritual Despotism,” who deserves to be designated one of the master minds of the age, in the Appendix to the admirable production just named, thus speaks of Mr. Osburn's Book.

While sending this Appendix to press, the author has received a copy of the learned and very important work of Mr. William Osburn, Jun., on the • Doctrinal Errors of the Apostolical and Early Fathers,'-a work than which none could be much more seasonable, or possess a stronger claim to the attention of the clergy of the Established Church. The author does not take upon him to recommend a book which may well be left to recommend itself : but he avails himself of the opportunity thus to mention it to any of his readers under whose eye it might not otherwise fall. Mr. Osburn and the author have been travelling over the same ground, and each alike has carried with him, not the

scopal and Ele in ferventlonis among the ty, confuse med

ries, and yet folios. Mr. Osburhis seasonable work. Osburn's work, thd sandid

solicitudes or the prepossessions of a theologian; but the free notions of a Christian layinan:-they have moreover reached, on several points, the same general conclusions, and have even happened to express their opinions, more than once or twice, in a phraseology remarkably coincident. Mr. Osburn and the author are alike deeply impressed with the melancholy fact of the early and extensive corruption of Christianity ; both feel the absurdity of talking of the purity and spirituality of the pristine Church, and the utter error of dating that corruption from the time of Constantine. Again, both would strongly urge the importance, at the present moment, of learned and ingenuous enquiries concerning those false notions and superstitions which, having had their birth in the second century, or sooner, were permitted to live in our reformed Churches; but which now encumber our practical Christianity, confuse our theology, and generate interminable disagreements among the clergy. Finally, Mr. Osburn and the author agree in fervently desiring the welfare and perpetuity of the Episcopal and Established Church."-p. 488.

Dr. J. P, Smith, whose vast erudition and amiable piety have long secured the esteem even of his antagonists in the field of literary and theological controversy, in his Letter to Dr. Lee, designates the book of Mr. Osburn "a convincing monument of his learning, piety, and laboriousness."

The Reviewer of the book in the “ British Critic," states that “the author's talents and acquirements are of a high order," and that “his zeal is equal to his learning."

The Reviewer in the “ Congregational Magazine" says “It is probable that many are not aware how falsely the early Christians interpreted the word of God, and into what great doctrinal errors they fell. A book written by an author who had diligently consulted the original works of the Fathers, was certainly much wanted. Many, we know, have been desirous to ascertain what the Fathers really believed, and have not been contented with the loose unsatisfactory accounts which are found in most church histories, and yet have not possessed the time, nor felt inclination to wade through the original folios. Mr. Osburn has, therefore, conferred an obligation on all lovers of Christian literature by his seasonable work.

"We have much pleasure in recommending Mr. Osburn's work, though we do not subscribe to all his opinions. He generally writes in a fair and candid manner, and seldom introduces party feelings into his discussions. His work has interested us, and we hope that our recommendation may induce others to peruse it."-p. 298, &c.

The public press in Mr. Osburn's own town, where his character and attainments are best known, and are consequentiy most accurately appreciated, have united in earnest commendation of this elaborate work.

The “ Leeds Intelligencep,” says

“ This is a bold and arduous undertaking for a Layman; but as the Clergy have, in some sense, shrunk from speaking out,' Mr. Osbum is more than justified. That he is well qualified for the enquiry, his book affords ample evidence. We do not affect to criticise the work before us; our object is simply to give an account of it, and to call public attention to it. Mr. Osburn's varied talents and acquirements are known and appreciated, not only in Leeds where he dwells, but throughout a wide literary range. He has often shone in works of imagination, science, and elegant literature: he has completed the circle by an elucidation of divinity, that will bloom in freshness when the hand that wielded his pen shall be motionless."

The " Leeds Mercury” contains the following commendatory remarks ;

"They who know, from experience, the immense labour of searching ancient writers,--who have been taught, by the same stern monitor, at what a price of disappointment they can only purchase the little gold dust of knowledge and truth, will not coldly regard, or lightly rate, this scholarly performance. There is great pains-taking, the readings are accurate, and it is a no mean monument of rigid, vigilant toil. Our author's purpose is to discredit that state of purity in which many have represented the Christian Church to have continued during the second and third centuries. In this he is quite successful."

Ton, science, and eleganterary range. He not only in Leeds warried

And the “ Leeds Times” adds to the whole,

« This work is evidently the result of immense labour; it occasionally displays considerable intellectual ability; and a tone of high and honourable principle is breathed throughout every page. Mr. William Osburn is zealously and conscientiously attached to the Established Church; he has not hesitated to avow most explicitly his devoted respect to its institutions in his book; he has just as much right to his opinion as we have to ours; and he has every claim to the fullest liberty of stating and defending his own principles, and to receive full credit for the integrity and sincerity of his motives. He is infinitely more to be respected for the manly and intelligible avowal of his peculiar sentiments upon this topic, than if by any affectation of latitudinarian candour, he had in any respect merged, or neutralised, or concealed, what he deems to be the truth. We must not omit here to observe, that Mr. Osburn's episcopalian opinions are neither unnecessarily obtruded, nor offensively expressed. He only speaks as a man of decision and conviction ought to speak, upon matters which he considers of paramount and universal importance.

“ We shall add in conclusion, that we have seldom perused a book with greater advantage than this most instructive volume, No library, and especially no theological library, ought to be without it. We repeat it, for this volume Mr. Osburn is entitled to the permanent gratitude of the public."

In the “Christian Guardianthe Reviewer says

“We pass over with considerable reluctance the chapters on Tradition, Inspiration, and Angels, in each of which, but especially in the last, Mr. 0. has brought together much that is important and highly interesting; and hasten to notice the statements given us concerning Baptism and the Lord's Supper. In each of these it is remarkable how early the mystery of iniquity began to work; how soon the outward and visible sign was confounded with the inward and spiritual grace, and how readily even the Early Fathers adopted language which was eventually regarded as countenancing the monstrous dogmas of transubstantiation. On all these points we should desire to quote largely, but we are compelled to omit by far the greater part of the passages we had marked, and to confine ourselves to a few brief extracts, where we should gladly insert pages.

“We cannot, however, take our leave of Mr. 0. without acknowledging our obligations to him for this able, this seasonable publication. The title is, as we have observed, startling; the commencement of his work struck us as somewhat involved and obscure; but he warms as he goes on; and though we should regret that the perusal of his work should render any theological student negligent of the writings of the Fathers, we cannot but feel that the errors he has pointed out may well check that over-deference to their authority, which we fear even at the present prevails to a considerable extent. There are, indeed, some points in which our conclusions differ from Mr. 0.; but, on the whole, we strongly recommend his work to the perusal of our readers in general, and more especially to those of the clerical profession."—pp. 148, 152.

Inspiration, anogether much that is rims concerning Baptism

over-deferable exto.; but,

XLIV.
32mo., Gilt Edges, Price 4d., Stiff Cover.
THE REAL PRESENCE.

XLV. 32mo., Gilt Edges, Price 4d., Stiff Cover. THE SUFFICIENCY OF SCRIPTURE VINDICATED.

XLVI.
BY THE REV. JAMES PARSONS.
Fifth Edition.-8vo., Price 12s.

SERMONS,
By JAMES PARSONS, Minister of Lendal Chapel, York.

XLVII.

18mo., Cloth Boards, Price 3s. CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN MRS. SCOTT AND HER DAUGHTER MARY, ON INTERESTING SUBJECTS;

Embracing many of the early Incidents of Scripture History.

XLVIII.
WORKS ON THE FRENCH LANGUAGE,

BY MR. RUBATTEL,

Foolscap 8vo., Price 5s., Cloth Boards. A CONCISE AND COMPREHENSIVE GRAMMAR OF

THE FRENCH LANGUAGE,
For the Use of Young Students; containing several Idiomatic and
Difficult Constructions, which had been hitherto unexplained, reduced
to Rule.

XLIX.
Foolscap 8vo., Price 2s., Cloth Boards.
KEY TO THÉ EXERCISES IN RUBATTEL'S

FRENCH GRAMMAR.

Foolscap 8vo., Price 4s. 6d., Cloth Boards. INTRODUCTION TO THE FRENCH LANGUAGE, Containing a Concise and Complete Arrangement of the Verbs.

LI
Second Edition. Roval 32mo., Silk, 2s. 6d.
SCATTERED LEAVES OF POESY.

LII.

Foolscap 8vo., Price 4s., Cloth Boards.
SELECTIONS FROM A CORRESPONDENCE

ON

SUBJECTS CONNECTED WITH CHRISTIAN FAITH AND PRACTICE.

With an Introductory Preface, by MRS. STEVENS.

LIII.
Third Edition. 18mo., Price 3s. Bound.

THE JUVENILE REMEMBRANCER.
Rules for Behaviour, Reading, and Writing ; Divine and Moral

Maxims; Catechisms on the Holy Scriptures, &c.

LIV.
BY THE REV. W. H. STOWELL.

Foolscap 8vo., Cloth Boards, Price 3s. 6d. * - THE MISSIONARY CHURCH : Designed to show that the Spread of the Gospel is the proper Business

of the Church as the Church. By the Rev. W. H. STOWELL, President of Rotherham College.

“It gives me much pleasure to take this occasion to recommend to serious perusal the publication of a dear friend, the Rev. Professor Stowell, entitled, - The Missionary Church. To its elegance of composition, closeness of reasoning, and piety of temper, is added much information on the details of our modern Societies and on the branches of their agency."— Missions : their Authority, Scope, and Encouragement. By the Rev. Dr. Hamilton.'

LV.

Royal 8vo., vol. 1., part I., Price 10s. 6d., Cloth Boards. TRANSACTIONS OF THE PHILOSOPHICAL AND

LITERARY SOCIETY OF LEEDS,
CONSISTING ON PAPERS READ BEFORE THE SOCIETY.

A. PICKARD, PRINTER, TOP OF BRIGGATE, LEEDS.

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