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Cheerly rouse the slumbering morn
And every shepherd tells his tale .
Hard by a cottage-chimney smokes
And then, in haste, her bower she leaves
And young and old come forth to play .
His shadowy flail had thrash'd the corn
Tower'd cities please us then .
Such sights as youthful poets dream
Thoughts in a garden .
Vulcan, contrive me such a cup
I in these flowery meads would be
Go, lovely Rose
Oye groves and crystal fountains
When first thy eyes unveil
At last divine Cecilia came
Love has still something of the seas.
Built uniform, not little, nor too great
To all you ladies now at land
Meanwhile he smokes, and laughs at merry tales
In the vast abyss
Down bend the banks, the trees depending grow .
'Twas built with turrets on a rising ground.
Lord, as in heaven, on earth Thy will be done"
The moon takes up the wondrous tale
The victor's shouts and dying groans confound .
The cord slides swiftly through his glowing hands .
Cease, cease, thou cruel ocean.
And all the village wept
And on his fist, th' unhooded falcon sits
As the good shepherd tends his fleecy care .
And boys in flow'ry bands the tiger lead

Drauen by
F. TAYLER.
R. REDGRAVE, R.A.
T. CRESWICK, R.A.
H. J. TọWNSEND
J. C. HORSLEY, A. R. A.
H. J. TOWNSEND
T. CRESWICK, R.A.
R. REDGRAVE, R.A.
BIRKET FOSTER
JOHN GILBERT,
BIRKET FOSTER
JULIAN PORTCH
E. M. WIMPERIS
BIRKET FOSTER
M. A. MADOT
JOHN GILBERT .
BIRKET FOSTER
E. DUNCAN
F. TAYLER
E. DUNCAN.
J. H. HILL.
T. CRESWICK, R.A.
GEORGE THOMAS
BIRKET FOSTER
GEORGE THOMAS
GEORGE THOMAS
BIRKET FOSTER
BIRKET FOSTER
GEORGE THOMAS.
H. WARREN.
E, V. B...

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PROLOGUE TO THE CANTERBURY TALES.

BY GEOFFREY CHAUCER.

GEOFFREY CHAUCER, the “Father of English Poetry," was born in London in 1328. The rank of his family is unknown, but it must have been respectable. It is believed that he was educated at Cambridge, and that, after leaving that University, he travelled for some time on the Continent, and then devoted himself to the law, but afterwards relinquished the Bar for the Court. He married a sister of the lady who afterwards became the wife of John of Gaunt, and obtained considerable influence through the favour of that Prince, which led to his receiving some profit. able appointments, and being sent on embassies. His alleged connexion with the reformer Wycliffe brought upon him many misfortunes, and ended in his being an exile and a prisoner for a long period. He at length regained his liberty, and lived remote from Court, amid the charming shades of Woodstock, where he wrote many of his best poems. The accession of Henry Bolingbroke, the son of his brother-in-law and patron, drew him from his retirement; his fortunes became once more bright, and he spent the evening of his days in ease and abundance. He died in 1400, and was buried in estminster Abbey. His principal poems are a series known as the “ Canterbury Tales,” the Prologue to which we have printed as the best example of his style.]

WHANNE that Aprille with his shoures sote'
The droughte of March hath perced’ to the rote,
And bathed every veine in swiche 4 licour,
Of whiche vertue engendred is the flour ;s
Whan Zephirus eke with his sote brethe
Enspired hath in every holt and hethe
The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
Hath in the Ram his halfe cours yronne,
And smale foules & maken melodie,
That slepen alle night with open eye,

2 Pierced

4. Such

1 Sweet. 5 Flower

3 Root. 7 Run

6 Sun

8 Small birds.

B В

3

So priketh hem' nature in hir? corages;
Than longen folk to gon on pilgrimages,
And palmeres for to seken strange strondes,
To serve halwest couthes in sondry londes ;
And specially, from every shires ende
Of Englelond, to Canterbury they wende,
The holy blisful martyr for to seke,
That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke.

Befelle, that, in that seson on a day,
In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay,
Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage
To Canterbury with devoute corage,
At night was come into that hostelrie
Wel nine and twenty in a compagnie
Of sondry folk, by aventure yfalle
In felawship, and pilgrimes were they alle,
That toward Canterbury wolden ride.
The chambres and the stables weren wide,
And wel we weren esed ? atte beste.

And shortly, whan the sonne was gon to reste. So hadde I spoken with hem everich on, That I was of hir felawship anon, And made forword 8 erly for to rise, To take oure way ther as I you devise.

But natheles, while I have time and space, Or that I forther in this tale pace,

1 Them.

2 Their
5 Known.

4 Saints

3 Courage.
6 The sign of the inn.
8 Promise.

7 Accommodated

Me thinketh it accordant to reson,

To tellen you alle the condition
Of eche of hem, so as it semed me,
And whiche they weren, and of what degre;
And eke in what araie that they were inne :
And at a knight than wol I firste beginne.

A KNIGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, That fro the time that he firste began To riden out, he loved chevalrie, Trouthe and honour, fredom and curtesie.

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Ful worthy was he in his lordes werre,'
And therto hadde he ridden, no man ferre,
As wel in Cristendom as in Hethenesse,
And ever honoured for his worthinesse.

At Alisandre 3 he was whan it was wonne.
Ful often time he hadde the bord begonne +
Aboven alle nations in Pruce.
In Lettowe hadde he reysed? and in Ruce,
No cristen man so ofte of his degre.
In Gernade' at the siege eke hadde he be
Of Algesir, and ridden in Belmarie.
At Leyes was he, and at Satalie,
Whan they were wonne; and in the Grete see
At many a noble armee hadde he be.
At mortal batailles hadde he ben fiftene,

I Wars.
2 Further.

3 Alexandria
4 Had been placed at the head of the table.
6 Lithuania, 7 Journeyed.

8 Russia.

5 Prussia 9 Granada.

And foughten for our faith at Tramissene
In listes thries, and ay slain his fo.

This ilke worthy knight hadde ben also
Somtime with the lord of Palatie,
Agen another hethen in Turkie :
And evermore he hadde a sovereine pris.
And though that he was worthy he was wise,
And of his port as meke as is a mayde.
He never yet no villanie ne sayde
In alle his lif, unto no manere wight.'
He was a veray parfit gentil knight.

But for to tellen you of his araie,
His hors was good, but he ne was not gaie.
Of fustian he wered a gipon,
Alle besmotred with his habergeon,
For he was late ycome fro his viage,
And wente for to don his pilgrimage.

3

With him ther was his sone a yonge SQUIER, A lover, and a lusty bacheler, With lockes crull as they were laide in presse. Of twenty yere

he was I gesse. Of his stature he was of even lengthe, And wonderly deliver and grete of strengthe. And he hadde be somtime in chevachie, In Flaundres, in Artois, and in Picardie,

of
age

3 Coat of mail.

1 Kind of man.
4 Nimble.

2 Short coat.
5 Military expedition.

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