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One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
When they reached the hall-door, and the charger stood

near; So light to the croup the fair lady he swung, So light to the saddle before her he sprung! “She is won! We are gone, over bank, bush, and

scaur! They'll have fleet steeds that follow !” quoth young

Lochinvar.

There was mounting 'mong Græmes of the Netherby

clan; Fosters, Fenwicks, and Musgraves, they rode and they

ran; There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee, But the lost bride of Netherby ne'er did they see. So daring in love, and so dauntless in war, Have you e'er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?

WALTER Scott.

-ooooo

XXXVII. - THE SLEEPY HOLLOW SCHOOLMASTER.

1. The cognomen of Crane was not inapplicable to his person. He was tall but exceedingly lank, with narrow shoulders, long arms and legs, hands that dangled a mile out of his sleeves, feet that might have served for shovels ; and his whole frame most loosely hung together. His head was small, and flat at top, with huge ears, large

green glassy eyes, and a long snipe nose, so that it looked like a weathercock perched upon his spindle neck to tell which way the wind blew.

2. To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield.

3. His schoolhouse was a low building of one large room, rudely constructed of logs; the windows partly glazed, and partly patched with leaves of old copy-books. It was most ingeniously secured at vacant hours by a withe twisted in the handle of the door, and stakes set against the window-shutters, so that though a thief might get in with perfect ease, he would find some embarrassment in getting out; an idea most probably borrowed by the architect from the mystery of an eelpot.

4. The schoolhouse stood in a rather lonely but pleasant situation, just at the foot of a woody hill, with a brook running close by, and a formidable birch tree growing at one end of'it. From hence the low murmur of his pupils' voices, conning over their lessons, might be heard in a drowsy summer's day, like the hum of a beehive, interrupted now and then by the authoritative voice of the master, in the tone of menace or command; or, peradventure, by the appalling sound of the birch, as he urged some tardy loiterer along the flowery path of knowledge. Truth to say, he was a conscientious man, and ever bore in mind the golden maxim, “Spare the

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rod and spoil the child.” Ichabod Crane's scholars certainly were not spoiled.

5. When school hours were over, he was even the companion and playmate of the larger boys; and, on holiday afternoons, would convoy home some of the smaller ones who happened to have pretty sisters, or good housewives for mothers, noted for the comforts of the cupboard.

6. To help out his maintenance, he was, according to country custom in those parts, boarded and lodged at the houses of the farmers whose children he instructed. With these he lived successively a week at a time; thus going the rounds of the neighborhood, with all his worldly effects tied up in a cotton handkerchief.

7. That all this might not be too onerous on the purses of his rustic patrons, who are apt to consider the cost of schooling a grievous burden, and schoolmasters as mere drones, he had various ways of rendering himself both useful ind agreeable. He assisted the farmers occasionally in the lighter labors of their farms, helped to make hay, mended the fences, took the horses to water, drove the cows from pasture, and cut wood for the winter fire.

8. He laid aside, too, all the dominant dignity and absolute sway with which he lorded it in his little empire, the school, and became wonderfully gentle and ingratiating. He found favor in the eyes of the mothers by petting the children, particularly the youngest; and like the lion bold, which whilom so magnanimously the lamb did hold, he would sit with a child on one knee,

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