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25.

ANTICIPATION

October, 1803.

Shout, for a mighty Victory is won !
On British ground the Invaders are laid low;
The breath of Heaven has drifted them like snow,
And left them lying in the silent sun,
Never to rise again!-the work is done.
Come forth, ye Old Men, now in peaceful show
And greet your Sons ! drums beat, and trumpets blow!
Make
merry,
Wives!

ye

little Children stun
Your Grandame's ears with pleasure of your noise !
Clap, Infants, clap your hands! Divine must be
That triumph, when the very worst, the pain,
And even the prospect of our Brethren slain,
Hath something in it which the heart enjoys:-
In glory will they sleep and endless sanctity.

26.

November, 1806.

Another year! - another deadly blow! Another mighty Empire overthrown! And we are left, or shall be left, alone; The last that dares to struggle with the Foe. 'Tis well! from this day forward we shall know That in ourselves our safety must be sought; That by our own right hands it must be wrought, That we must stand unpropp'd, or be laid low. O. Dastard whom such foretaste doth not chear! We shall exult, if They who rule the land Be Men who hold its many blessings dear, Wise, upright, valiant; not a venal Band, Who are to juilge of danger which they fear, And honour which they do not understand.

N O T ES

to the

FIRST VOLUME.

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NOTES.

NOTE 1.

Page 1.--To the Duisy. This Poein, and two others to the same Flower, which the Reader will find in the second Volume, were written in the year 1802; which is mentioned, because in some of the ideas, though not in manner in which those ideas are connected, and likewise even in some of the expressions, they bear a striking resemblance to a Poem (lately published) of Mr. Montgomery, entitled, a Field Flower. This being said, Mr. Montgomery will not think any apology due to himp; I cannot however help address

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