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And sootb’d with many a dream the hour of rest ;
Thou should'st have loved it most, when most oppress’d.
And nurs’d it with an agony of Care,
Ev'n as a Mother her sweet infant heir,
That wan and sickly drops upon her breast !

SONNET III.
Thou gentle Look, that didst my soul beguile,
Why hast thou left me ? Still in some fond dream
Revisit my sad heart, auspicious Smile !
As falls on closing flowers the lunar beam :
What time, in sickly mood, at parting day
I lay me down and think of happier years ;
Of Joys, that glimmer'd in Hope's twilight ray
Then left me darkling in a vale of tears.
O pleasant days of Hope-for ever flown !
Could I recal you !--But that thought is vain.
Availeth not Persuasion's sweetest tone
To lure the fleet-wing’d Travellers back again :
Yet fair, tho' faint, their images shall gleam
Like the bright Rainbow on an evening stream.

SONNET IV.

TO THE RIVER OTTER.

DEAR native Brook! wild Streamlet of the West !
How many various-fated years have past,
What blissful and what anguish'd hours, since last
I skimm'd the smooth thin stone along thy breast.
Numbering its light leaps ! Yet so deep imprest
Sink the sweet scenes of Childhood, that mine eyes
I never shut amid the sunny blaze,
But straight with all their tints thy waters rise,
Thy crossing plank, thy margin's willowy maze,
And bedded sand that, vein'd with various dies,

Gleam'd thro' thy bright transparence to the gaze !
Visions of Childhood ! oft have ye beguild
Lone Manhood's cares, yet waking fondest sighs,
Ah! that once more I were a careless Child !

SONNET V.

COMPOSED WHILE CLIMBING THE LEFT ASCENT OF

BROCKLEY COOMB, IN THE COUNTY OF

SOMERSET, MAY, 1795. With many a pause and oft reverted eye I climb the Coomb's ascent : sweet songsters near Warble in shade their wild-wood melody: Far off th' unvarying Cuckoo soothes my ear. Up scour the startling stragglers of the Flock That on green plots o'er precipices browze : From the forc'd fissures of the naked rock The Yew tree bursts! beneath its dark green boughs (Mid which the May-thorn blends its blossoms white) Where broad smooth stones jut out in mossy seats, I rest. And now have gain’d the topmost site. Ah! what a luxury of landscape meets My gaze! Proud Towers, and Cots more dear to me Elm-shadow'd Fields, and prospect-bounding Sea ! Deep sighs my lonely heart: I drop the tear : Enchanting spot! O were my Sara here !

SONNET VI.
Sweet Mercy ! how my very heart has bled
To see thee, poor Old Man and thy grey hairs
Hoar with the snowy blast; while no one cares
To clothe thy shrivell’d limbs and palsied head.
My father! throw away this tatter'd vest
That mocks thy shiv'ring ! take my garment-use
A young man's arm ! I'll melt these frozen dews

That hang from thy white beard and numb thy breast.
My Sara too shall tend thee, like a Child :
And thou shalt talk, in our fire side's recess,
Of purple Pride, that scowls on Wretchedness.-
He did not scowl, the Galilean mild,
Who met the Lazar turn'd from rich man's doors,
And call’d him Friend, and wept upon his sores !

SONNET VII. PALE Roamer, thro' the Night! thou poor Forlora ! Remorse that man on his death-bed possess, Who in the credulous hour of tenderness Betray'd, then cast thee forth to Want and Scorn. The world is pityless; the Chaste one's pride, Mimic of Virtue, scowls on thy distress : Thy Loves and they that envied thee deride : And vice alone will shelter Wretchedness! 0! I am sad to think, that there should be Cold-bosom’d lewd ones, who endure to place Foul offerings on the shrine of Misery, And force from Famine the caress of Love ! May He shed healing on thy sore disgrace, He, the great Comforter that rules above !

SONNET VIII. TO THE AUTHOR OF " THE ROBBERS." SCHILLER ! * that hour I would have wish'd to die, If thro' the shudd'ring midnight I had sent

* One night in Winter, on leaving a College-friend's room, with whorn I had supped, I carelessly took away with me “The Robbers”' a drama, the very name of which I had never before heard of :a winter midnight—the wind high-and “The Robbers” for the first time-The readers of Schiller will conceive what I felt. Schiller introduces no supernatural beings ; yet his human beings agitate and astonish, more than all the goblin rout even of Siaks. peare.

From the dark Dungeon of the Tower time-rent
That fearful voice, a famish'd Father's cry-
That in no after moment aught less vast
Might stamp me mortal! A triumphant shout
Black Horror scream'd and all her goblin rout,
From the more with’ring scene diminish'd past.
Ah! Bard tremendous in sublimity!
Could I behold thee in thy loftier mood,
Wand'ring at eve with finely frenzied eye
Beneath some vast old tempest-swinging wood !
Awhile with mute awe gazing I would brood,
Then weep aloud in a wild ecstasy !

SONNET IX.

COMPOSED ON A JOURNEY HOMEWARD; THE AU

THOR HAVING RECEIVED INTELLIGENCE OF THE

BIRTH OF A SON, SEPTEMBER, 20, 1796. Oft o'er my brain does that strange fancy roll Which makes the present (while the flash doth last) Seem a mere semblance of some unknown past, Mix'd with such feelings as perplex the soul Self-question'd in her sleep: and some have said We liv'd, ere yet this fleshy robe we wore. O my sweet Baby! when I reach my door, If heavy looks should tell me, thou wert dead (As sometimes, thro' excess of hope, I fear) I think that I should struggle to believe Thou wert a Spirit, to take this nether sphere Sentenc'd for some more venial crime to grieve; Didst scream, then spring to meet Heaven's quick

reprieve. While we wept idiy o'er thy little bier !

SONNET X.

TO A FRIEND, WHO ASKED HOW I FELT, WHEN THE

NURSE FIRST PRESENTED MY INFANT TO ME.

CHARLES! my slow heart was only sad, when first
I scann'd that face of feeble infancy:
For dimly on my thoughtful spirit burst
All I had been, and all my babe might be !
But when I saw it on its Mother's arm,
And hanging at her bosom (she the while
Bent o’er its features with a tearful smile)
Then I was thrilld and melted, and most warm
Impress’d a Father's kiss : and all beguil'd
Of dark remembrance, and presageful fear
I seem'd to see an Angel's form appear.-
'Twas even thine, beloved Woman mild !
So for the Mother's sake the Child was dear
And dearer was the Mother for the Child.

REFLECTIONS

ON HAVING LEFT A PLACE OF RETIREMENT,

Low was our pretty Cot: our tallest Rose
Peep'd at the chamber-window. We could hear
At silent noon, and eve, and early morn,
The Sea's faint murmur, In the

open air
Our Myrtles blossom’d; and across the porch
Thick Jasmines twin'd: the little landscape rour.d
Was green and woody and refresh'd the eye.
It was a spot, which you might aptly call
The Valley of Seclusion ! Once I saw
(Hallowing his Sabbath-day by quietness)
A wealthy son of Commerce saunter by,
Bristowa's citizen : Methought, it calm'd

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