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III French

THE MARSEILLAISE

ROUGET DE LISLE

Rouget de Lisle was born in Montaign, Lons-le-Saulnier, France, May 10, 1760. At an early age he composed poems and set them to music with much success. But he was destined for the army, and at the age of sixteen entered a military school, graduating with the rank of second lieutenant. During his service in the army, where he rose to the rank of captain engineer-in-chief, he was imprisoned because he refused to sanction the extreme measures of the Revolutionists. In 1796, he abandoned military life, and went to Paris to devote himself to music and poetry. He died at Choisy-le-Roi, June 26, 1836. In April

, 1792, on the day after France declared war against Austria, Rouget de Lisle attended a dinner at Strasburg. The conversation turned upon the political events which were then greatly disturbing men's minds. They spoke especially of the declaration of war that had just been made, and resolved that on so impressive an occasion there should be some inspired poem to answer to the enthusiasm of the French nation. At this, Rouget left the room, but returned in a short time, having composed the words and music of the hymn which became famous as the “Marseillaise."

Ye sons of France, awake to glory!

Hark! hark! what myriads bid you rise!
Your children, wives, and grandsires hoary —

Behold their tears and hear their cries!
Shall hateful tyrants, mischief breeding,

With hireling hosts, a ruffian band,

Affright and desolate the land,
While peace and liberty lie bleeding?

5

Refrain

10

To arms! to arms! ye brave!

The avenging sword unsheathe!
March on! march on! all hearts resolved

On victory or death.

15

Now, now, the dangerous storm is rolling,

Which treacherous kings, confederate, raise;
The dogs of war, let loose, are howling,

And lo! our fields and cities blaze;
And shall we basely view the ruin,

While lawless force, with guilty stride,

Spreads desolation far and wide,
With crimes and blood his hands imbruing?

20

25

Refrain
With luxury and pride surrounded,

The bold, insatiate despots dare
(Their thirst of gold and power unbounded)

To mete and vend the light and air.
Like beasts of burden would they load us,

Like gods would bid their slaves adore;

But man is man, and who is more?
Then shall they longer lash and goad us?

Refrain
O Liberty! can man resign thee,

Once having felt thy generous flame?
Can dungeons, bolts, or bars confine thee,

Or whips thy noble spirit tame?
Too long the world has wept, bewailing

That Falsehood's dagger tyrants wield;

But Freedom is our sword and shield,
And all their arts are unavailing.

30

35

Refrain

To arms! to arms! ye brave!

The avenging sword unsheathe!
March on! march on! all hearts resolved

On victory or death!

40

IV German

THE WATCH ON THE RHINE

Max SCHNECKENBURGER

Max Schneckenburger, a German poet, was born in Thalheim, Wurtemberg, February 17, 1819, and died at Burgdorf, near Bern, Switzerland, May 3, 1849.

“The Watch on the Rhine” ('Die Wacht am Rhein) was written in 1840. It is said that the author never passed a day without kneeling in prayer for his Fatherland.

A voice resounds like thunder-peal,
Mid dashing waves and clang of steel,
“The Rhine! the Rhine! the German Rhine!
Who guards to-day my stream divine?"

Dear Fatherland! No danger thine:
Firm stand thy sons to watch the Rhine.

They stand, a hundred thousand strong,
Quick to avenge their country's wrong:
With filial love their bosoms swell:
They'll guard the sacred landmark well.

Dear Fatherland! No danger thine:
Firm stand thy sons to watch the Rhine.

10

15

And though in death our hopes decay,
The Rhine will own no foreign sway;
For rich with water as its flood
Is Germany with hero blood.

Dear Fatherland! No danger thine:
Firm stand thy sons to watch the Rhine.

20

From yon blue sky are bending now
The hero-dead to hear our vow:
As long as German hearts are free

The Rhine, the Rhine, shall German be."

Dear Fatherland! No danger thine:
Firm stand thy sons to watch the Rhine.

25

“While flows one drop of German blood,

Or sword remains to guard thy flood,
While rifle rests in patriot hand,
No foe shall tread thy sacred strand.”

Dear Fatherland! No danger thine:
Firm stand thy sons to watch the Rhine.

30

Our oath resounds: the river flows;
In golden light our banner glows;
Our hearts will guard thy stream divine:
The Rhine! the Rhine! the German Rhine!

Dear Fatherland! No danger thine:
Firm stand thy sons to watch the Rhine.

35

HELPS FOR STUDY

What American anthem is sung to the same tune as “God Save the King”?

What other countries adopted the tune?
Explain “fustrate their knavish tricks.”
Under what circumstances was “The Marseillaise" written?

Explain "imbruing," "insatiate despots," "mete and vend the
light and air.”
What is said of the author of “The Watch on the Rhine”?
How would danger be kept from Germany by guarding the Rhine?
Explain “sacred landmark.”
What is the great lesson taught by these four songs?

VOCABULARY

Marseillaise (mär-se-yāz')
Rouget de Lisle (rö-zhā'de-lēl')
Schneckenburger (shnek'en-börg-er)

THE EVILS OF WAR

HENRY CLAY

Henry Clay, the great Kentuckian, was born in Hanover County, Virginia, April 12, 1777. He removed to Kentucky at the age of twenty-one, after a meagre education at a back-country school, and some experiences of the principles of trade as studied behind the counter of a grocery store. His great wish was to make an honest living; so he applied himself to the study of law. He had immense powers of application, and in about a year he had so far mastered the elements that he made bold to open an office for practice. His success was better than might have been expected; it was largely due to the affability of his general conversation, which inclined his friends to patronize him whenever possible, and he soon showed that their confidence or favor was not abused. In 1803, at the age of twenty-six, he was chosen representative of Fayette County. From that time, till near the end of his life, Henry Clay was never without a voice in the councils of his country. The public positions which he filled were numerous and honorable; and in all of them he set a standard of ability which was difficult to rival. He served as United States Senator, Member of Congress, peace commissioner to Ghent, and Secretary of State, and was three times candidate for President. On June 29, 1852, he died at Washington, D. C., after a full and useful life of seventy-five years.

The speech on “The New Army Bill,” is one of the most forceful and characteristic of Henry Clay's utterances on political issues. It was delivered in the House of Representatives January 8, 1813.

War, pestilence, and famine, by the common consent of mankind, are the three greatest calamities which can befall our species; and war, as the most direful, justly stands foremost and in front. Pestilence and famine, no doubt 5 for wise although inscrutable purposes, are inflictions of Providence, to which it is our duty, therefore, to bow with obedience, humble submission, and resignation. Their duration is not long, and their ravages are limited. They

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