Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

A

COMMENTARY

ON

THE EPISTLE

TO

THE HEBR E W S.

BY MOSES STUART,

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SACRED LITERATURE IN THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY AT ANDOVER,

AUTHOR OF "COMMENTARY ON THE ROMANS," &c.

FOURTH EDITION CORRECTED AND ENLARGED.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR THOMAS TEGG AND SON, 73, CHEAPSIDE:

R. GRIFFIN AND CO., GLASGOW;

T. T. AND H. TEGG, DUBLIN;
ALSO J. AND S. A. TEGG, SYDNEY AND HOBART TOWN.

MDCCCXXXVII.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

A New edition of the present work has for some time been determined on, in order to meet the calls for it which are often repeated. It may be proper to state in this preface, that, since the publication of the first edition, a work of the like kind, and of about the same size has made its appearance in Germany; the author of which is Frederic Bleek, Professor Extraordinarius of Theology in the University of Berlin, at the time of its publication. Prof. Bleek is distinguished for his attainments in the department of sacred criticism. Of his work, however, only the first volume has come to hand, which (like the first part of the present volume) is wholly occupied with an Introduction to the epistle to the Hebrews. The author believes that Apollos (and not Paul) was the author of this epistle; and a great part of his book is occupied in giving the history of opinions among the ancient churches relative to the authorship of the epistle, or in adducing arguments, against the Pauline origin of it.

In addition to this work of Bleek, replete with learning, and exhibiting for the most part a commendable degree of moderation and candour, I have received a review of the first edition of my own work, written by the same author since the publication of his own volume, and published in the Universal Literary Gazette at Halle. When Prof. Bleek published the volume just named, he had not seen my work on the same subject. His Review, therefore, which is a long one, exhibits more definitely his opinions in reference to those points in which I differ from him.

In this second edition of my work, I have throughout the first part, had my eye upon the work and review of Prof. Bleek, and have frequently gone into an examination in extenso of his positions. In consequence of this, there has been a very considerable addition made to the present edition.

I should have much preferred to render the work smaller, instead of enlarging it; for I well know, that a majority of readers

in our country take less interest in discussions of such a nature as it comprises, than in commentary. But duty to the cause of sacred criticism, and my obligation to endeavour to meet the exigencies of the times in regard to criticisms recently made upon the epistle to the Hebrews, do not render it compatible for me, as I view the subject, to coinply with the wishes of this class of readers. I am quite sure, moreover, that if they were fully aware of the force which is already organised against its Pauline origin and its canonical authority, they would feel and judge very differently with respect to the importance of critical efforts to defend the conmonly received opinion of the churches in regard to the author of the epistle.

Persuaded as I am, that no efforts of learning or ingenuity can ever extinguish the light, which the most ancient testimony of the Christian Fathers, and the internal structure of the writing itself, afford in relation to the origin and author of the epistle to the Hebrews, I feel it to be a duty, while my convictions remain as they are, not to pass in silence any attempt which is worth regarding, to obscure this light. This is my apology for the additional matter of the present edition: which, although it does not amount in itself to a large number of pages, has, from the nature of the discussions, cost much severe labour; such, indeed, as only those can estimate, who have been engaged in the like occupation. I do not mention this in order to enhance any claims of mine on the reader; but only to satisfy him, that I have not spared any efforts which it has been in my power to make, in order to accommodate my work to the present state of sacred literature.

Prof. Kuinoel, the well known Commentator on the historical books of the New Testament, has also published, a short time since, a commentary on the epistle to the Hebrews, with a somewhat extended and laboured introduction. He accords in the main with Bleek: but he has merely given a synopsis of what has been advanced by others, without adding any thing that requires notice which is strictly his own. On this account, I have not deemed it expedient to make his introductory essay a subject of special examination in the present edition of my work. His commentary presents some things which are worthy of attention, and by which I shall endeavour to profit in my notes upon the epistle; although, in general, it seems to me far inferior to his other critical works.

The alterations and additions, both great and small, made in the present edition, are too numerous to be specified. It is my sincere wish to render the work more complete, and more worthy of the reader's approbation. All the changes that have been made, have originated in this desire, and in a sense of the obligation to do the best in one's power, which necessarily attaches itself to the publication of a work on subjects so important as those of which the

present volume treats.

I have only to add, that the type used in printing the present edition, enables the publishers to present it to the reader within the compass of fewer pages than were occupied in the first edition, and at a somewhat less price, notwithstanding the additions which it has received. This, indeed, is some sacrifice on the part of the publishers, inasmuch as their labour of setting up the work in type (taking the additions into the account) is increased, while their profit is diminished. But this sacrifice they cheerfully make, with the hope of accommodating the public.

M. STUART.

Theol. Sem. Andover,

Sept. 2, 1833

THE PUBLISHERS' PREFACE.

The high opinion, universally entertained in this country, of Professor Stuart's Commentary on the Hebrews, and the urgent demand for copies of the second and much improved American edition of the work, have induced the present publishers to bring forward this Fourth EDITION, forming a very correct and, it is hoped, not unimproved reprint of the second, with all its enlargements and improvements, fresh from the hand of the author.

The absolute want of grammatical and philological commentary on the Scriptures, in the English language, renders this a very acceptable volume to those who are their professed interpreters. In vain do our students in Theology, who engage in a critical examination of the Sacred text, seek for philological assistance in the doctrinal commentaries of Henry or Brown, of Guisc or Doddridge,

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »