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curred a few years since in some of the only serve as a poison to the minds of Swiss Cantons, were the first effects of a men when separated from real Chrisrevival of religion, particularly the forma- tianity; we feel it to be incumbent on tion of a Missionary Society, attacked all Christians, in virtue of their vocation and followed up with greater fury and and privileges, and in obedience to the ignorance of the truth. Rationalism had command, - Go ye into all the world, and so stifled all religious feeling and bene- preach the gospel to every creature,' to volence, that it attributed every display labour to extend the kingdom of God of zeal to some concealed and sinister over the whole earth." design. The issue of this agitation was The writer then proceeds to urge the the removal of Lange to a curacy in the duty of zeal, from the consideration of country. The enemies of the truth, how the lasting consolation which the gospel ever, have gained nothing by his dismis. would administer to the nations who have sal, for his successor, animated by the been subdued by the superior force and same spirit, employs his energies in the injustice of professed Christians; from same cause, and is, like Lange, one of the the salutary re-action of missions in remost active members of the Missionary viving religion at home; from the indeSociety.

fatigable exertions of the wisdom of this Three years have elapsed since these world; and the beneficial example of the occurrences took place. The formation societies and missionary institutions estaof the Missionary Society was then the blished in Germany. object of most furious attacks; and now The report of the Cassel Missionary I have before me its third report detailing Society states the proceeds of the year to the most encouraging and remarkable be 763 thalers, about 3050 francs. This proofs of its success. With the society at sam, small as it is, proves how much the Cassel nine auxiliary societies are con- Missionary spirit is on the increase in this nected and give energy and importance to country, for it has been collected almost its operations. Of these the most inte. exclusively from the working classes, by resting is that at Marbourg, patronized by subscriptions of a few pence. Dr. Puchta, Professor of Law, and by If we contrast this report with the many of the University Theological Pro- condition of the country three years ago, fessors.

when such violent opposition was excited, The preface to the rules of the Asso- what may we not expect ! ciation is so remarkable, as an evidence Another remarkable feature in the of the progress of evangelical religion in religious condition of Germany, is the fact a region bitherto beclouded by the dark that 55 young Christians, almost all Werness of Rationalism, that I will make an tembergians, are candidates for admission extract.

into the Missionary Institution at Basle ; “ Grounded on a lively faith in Jesus where, however, from want of room, few Christ, the Saviour and Mediator of men, of this noble band can be received. by whose merits we confess, with a deep. At Frankfort on the Maine, the monthly sense of gratitude for the free grace of prayer meeting, hitherto almost unknown, God, that we have been delivered from and held in a small room, was, on Easter the darkness and uncleanness of the world Monday, renewed in the German re. and have become partakers of the bles formed church. It was crowded in every sings of his kingdom.

part, even to the aisles, and a most deIn the conviction that the Christian lightful and memorable evening it was Church is to unite the whole human race to the friends of missions. in one fold, under one shepherd; and These facts will certainly show that the persoaded that the intellectual but worldly Lord is reviving his work in this interesteducation now adopted in Europe willing country.

SUPPORT OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CLERGY IN FRANCE. As we have already given our readers the Budget of 1837 for the various denominations of Protestants in France, it may not be uninteresting to present a similar extract relating to the Roman Catholic religion in that country.

Francs. Expenses of regulating the Ecclesiastical Departmeut ........

176,000 Two Cardinal Archbishops and the Archbishop of Paris, at 25,000

francs .................................................... 75,000 Eleven Archbishops, at 15,000 francs............................... 165,000 Sixty-six Bishops, at 10,000 francs ...

660,000 Various indemnities for the Archbishops and Bishops, expenses of Bulls, &c. ................................

142,000 One hundred and seventy-four Vicars-General .......

365,000

Six hundred and sixty Canons .....
Three thousaud three hundred and one Vicars.....
Twenty-five thousand one hundred and seventy-five Curates
New Chapels of Ease to be erected in 1837 .........
Five thousand four hundred and pineteen Vicars ..............
Grants for double service .........
The Royal Chapter of St. Denis .......
Two thousand five hundred and twenty-five foundations in Colleges.
Grants to superannuated Priests ........
Occasional Grants to the Working Clergy ..
Grants to aged Nuns ....
Grants to superannuated Monks of St. John...
Expenses of Diocesan Edifices.......
Purchases, Erections, and keeping in Repair Residences of Bishops

and Colleges ..............................................
Grants for Churches and Residences of Priests....
Grants to twenty of the Convents ..............
Grants to Foreign Missions ........
Grapts to two private Religious Establishments......................

Francs. 1,003,500 4,190,100 20,900,000

40,000 1,896 650 315,000

97,000 1,010,000 490,000

25,000 550,000

5,000 445,000

1,600.000 700,000 142,000 14,000 6,300

35,013,150 Deducting Pensions and Allowances for Sees not filled up ...... 760,250

Expenses of the Roman Catholic Religion in France .......... 34,252,900

COMPARATIVE STIPENDS OF FRENCH AND ENGLISH BISHOPS. The salaries of the prelates of France and England have within a few months been determined by the legislative body of each country. The contrast is remarkable.

£. $. d. Cardinal Archbishop, 25,000 francs ........ .......... 1,041 13 4 Archbishop of Canterbury ...

......... 15,000 0 0 French Archbishop (ordinary) 15,000 francs

625 0 0 Archbishop of York ............: .................... 10,000 0 0 Archbishop of Paris, 25,000 francs .......

1,041 13 4 Bishop of London ........

10,000 0 0 French Bishop (ordinary) 10,000 francs .................. 416 13 4 English Bishop (ordinary) .....

...... 4,500 0 0

CS .........

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS AND MINOR CORRESPONDENCE. Since our former acknowledgments favours have been received from the Rev. Drs. J. P. Smith-Halley-Rev. Messrs. R. W. Hamilton-R. Ferguson-C. B. KiddT. Lewis--J. Morison-Thomas Guyer-J. Crossley-J. Rooker-J. Edwards--A. Pope-G. Smith --Algernon Wells-- J. Belcher.

Also from Mr. T. T. Sadler.

We hope in our next, to present our readers with a complete digest of the new Acts of Parliament for Registration and Marriage, with some necessary remarks thereon.

ERRATA IN THE LAST NUMBER. Page 567, first column, last line, for engineer, read inquirer. 569, first column, sixth line from bottom, for distinction, read destruction.

660, second column, eleventh line from bottom, for Russian, read Prussian. „ 565, first column, thirty-sixth line from bottom, for his last, read the last.

THE

CONGREGATIONAL MAGAZINE.

NOVEMBER, 1836.

RECOLLECTIONS

OF THE LATE

REV. JOSEPH WILLIAM HENRY PRITCHARD,

MINISTER OF THE INDEPENDENT CHURCH, ATTERCLIFFE,

NEAR SHEFFIELD.

W hen the aged head is laid low the hope excited by it is suddenly in death and dust, we are prepared disappointed; when the auguries for the event. Signs have set them- of our confidence have only mocked selves upon its brow not to be mis- us,--we require very different reataken. We are forewarned that sonings and lessons to ensure our all the worth and usefulness as- resignation, and to control our sociated with the time-honoured, grief. There is an absolute morvenerable, countenance, must be jification. Our calculation is inspeedily withdrawn. And we are, verted. Our prediction is belied. in some measure, reconciled to the Our bright dreamings of the future, dispensation. We can see no- our visions of delight, are scattered thing humiliating in it. It is but and made nought. A blank of repose after long toil and glorious vanity seems to spread itself over strife. The stricken saint has all. The distinctions of excelfallen by no rude shock, but ac- lence have apparently ceased to cording to a natural maturity. The avail. Life is dulled of its best fruit has dropt by its own ripeness. charms. “ The spring is torn out Mournful infirmities render life as of our year."* little to be desired as expected. These are doubtless mistakes of Friendship has uttered so many thought and errors of feeling. We partings, that it were cruel to wish justify them not. The sepulchral ibat it might survive to falter any urn, though filled with youthful more. And the influence of that ashes, is not placed in its dark example perishes not with the vital viche by a capricious hand. As organs which gave it a concentra- truly is here a work completed, tion and palpableness. Every thing as though it had reached a patriis in its proper course, its due order. archal term. There is no slight; The sun has swept its full circuit, there is no waste. “And he died," has set in the west, and is still is the epitaph written over all the throwing up glories from beneath pious by the finger of God: nor is the horizon, newer, softer, richer, than those of its orient and its noon. EK TOV EVIAUTOV To ē ap nuiv ežapai. But when youth is smitten ; when enral.-Polymnia: Gelon in Herod.

VOL. XIX. NS. NO. 143.

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the date unheeded, or least“ pre- said, that they won the esteem of cious in his sight." They who ihus us who had a little preceded them, are summoned timelessly from us and who could not have quite forshould be the rather honoured.- gotten that we had ourselves been Their character has yielded to a young. The interval was not large more rapid formation. The purer enough to forbid the full-hearted vein of the material has invited exercise of affection and confithe plastic skill, and obtained the dence. There was no disproporquicker polish. If we may speak tion which could hinder friendship. of their death as premature, we The elder might serve the younger should properly apply that lan- by that kind of experience which guage to their goodness and their the first few years of active life utility, the one expanded and mel- can scarcely fail to acquire-an lowed, the other employed and experience over which imagination signalized, so greatly beyond the casts many a fading colour still, common law and prevalent ex- and age has yet imposed no rigour, pectation. Despondency not un. And we were stimulated by the frequently oppresses minds of this advance of so much genius and class and fate, that they are re- goodness into the field. The fresher jected ; that upon their little trial baptism, whose drops stood glistenthey have failed; that they are ing on their forehead, reminded cast out as unprofitable. Why is us of our earlier devotement. A reserved to them so small an arc community of feeling arose between of their circle? Are not even the us, reminding us of the Sacred Band first fruits of their increase dis- of ancient Greece, in which the dained? The very dew of their more practised warrior adopted youth, is it not scornfully shivered, the untried stripling hero, training while the flower withers on which him for battle, and leading him to the morning saw it gleam? Oh, victory. The issue has not been let these tender spirits know that according to that model; we have they are the subjects of a process not been heaped together in a which the kindest mercy can ap- common death! ply. Small as is the arc, it is the One of these have I been very ascending section of their circle, recently called to lament. His curving to the apex, and termina- pattern should not be lost. He ting there. Transient as is the attained to no ordinary stature of dew, it is but exhaled to the heaven character. Few have attracted whence it fell. “ The cutting off to themselves, in so short a period, of their days” is only a sort of a more complete esteem. He who visual illusion. Life is condensed, now inscribes this little memorial, not abbreviated. The sacrifice is never came into contact with him not less costly because consumed but to be fascinated, instructed, in a keener fire. The race is not and reproved. The position of really less because of its speed. the teacher and the learner was in

How many of youthful prime precise contrariety to the differand promise have I lived to see ence of their years. My only suremoved from our “ present evil periority was, that, having lived world.” Some of these grew up longer, I had suffered more. with me, and we entered life in "Mine own familiar friend" company. Others had taken their might have made himself known, place more lately in this strange and secured no mean celebrity. scene. Of them, it may be truly But he coveted not to act a bus

or rent

ling part. He had not the proper labour. It really took a quality onsciousness of power. He was of fertile richness; and the stores of too sensitive a spirit for ex. of his knowledge grew so ample, losure. His station and repute were so constantly amassed, that vere, therefore, always unworthy the greater facility of others was of his capabilities. He, however, more than compensated by his elt it not, and was stranger alike prompt command and graceful dis. to querulousness and disappoint- posal of that intellectual wealth. ment. He looked upon none with He could not boast the mines of envy, nor sought a prouder fame. some, their exhaustless though unA few tried friends were far more assayed ores, their uncounted but to his exquisitely susceptible feel- crude gems; but his were, if more ing than the acclamations of the scanty, still always the most vamultitude ; and the noiseless tenor luable, wrought into the most noof his way best approved itself to ble shape, and laid open in their his judgment as well as to his sen- fairest brilliance. He was, theresibility. He chose his path, and fore, rarely at a loss for illustration steadily kept it.

or reply; if he besitated at all, the I do not profess to “ tell his delay arose from a fastidious taste, story.” Even a biographical etching discriminating between the treaI cannot attempt to trace. My sures which offered to bim so wide acquaintance with bim begun after and various a selection. his academic studies had termi- Fully did he appreciate the benated. What was his attention, nefits of general literature. Perwhat his ardour, what his assiduity, haps this was a more descriptive in that noviciate of mental disci- mark of bis mind than interest in pline, I can only infer from its profounder problems. In this resuccess. The College of Homerton ference the classical writings are had the honour of preparing him particularly intended; he caught for his ministry. He felt and no common portion of their spirit warmly expressed his debt to that and grace. He had a soul formed Institution. Perhaps in none other to be touched by beauty. His ex. of our ministerial schools is the aminations were not superficial; curriculum more severe and ex- he was the scholar in research : tended. Accurate readings con- but his ambition was not confined stitute its test and law. Patient to the vocabulary or the divaricate; submission to evidence is its dis- he found in those noble tongues tinguishing praise. The demand the elements of pbilosophy and for proof, the analysis of reasoning, the spells of eloquence. It was are incessant; an unquestioning, a not point and even felicitous phrase chivalrous, allegiance to truth must that he sought in these studies : he be the result.

went in quest of character, of huHow he profited by these ad- man nature, of scattered truth. vantages is the best testimony how The polite letters of the present diligently he improved them. His day are not unworthy of it, but conceptions were finely accurate, this department is so diversified, though many could form them that it is impossible for a person of more readily. The order of his serious habits and urgent duties mind was not that of a rich spon- to gain any but the most cursory taneousness. But the field was acquaintance with it. He would so well cultivated, that the soil be- not have said, Litere nihil sanantes. came changed by the act of the Much he did towards this purpose :

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