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6th. The first word of a quotation in a direct form ; as, always remember this ancient maxiın; “ Know thyself.”

7th. The first word of every line in poetry. 81h. The pronoun I, and the interjection !

9th. Words of particular importance; as, the Reformation, the Restoration, the Revolution.

PARSING. When the female pupil has passed through the whole of the preceding rules, and gained a thorough knowledge of the parts of speech, in all their moods, cases, &c. she should then proceed to some examples, in order to familiarize the subject to her mind, and be able to answer correctly, on being asked the grammatical construction of any word or sentence. This is done by what is called parsing, a few specimens of which are given in the following sentences.

Hope animates us.
A peaceful mind is virtue's reward.
Vice degrades us.
He who lives virtuously prepares for all events,
If folly entice thee, rejeci its allurements.

case.

EXERCISES IN PAR SING.

Hope animates us. Hope is a common substantive, of the neuter gender, the third person, in the singular number, and the nominative

Animates is a regular verb active, indicative inood, present tense, third person singular. Us is a personal pronoun, first person plural, and in the objective case.

A peaceful mind is virtue's reward. A is the indefinite article. Peaceful is an adjective. Mind is a common substantive, of the neuter gender, the third person, in the singular number, and the nominative case. Is is an irregular verb neuter, indicative mood, present lense, and the third person singular. Virtue's is a common substantive, of the third person, in the singular number, and the possessive case.

Reward is a coinmon substantive, of the third person, in the singular number, and the noinipative cas

Vice degrades us. l'ice is a common substantive, of the neuter gender, the third person, in the singular number, and the nominative case. Degrades is a verb active, indicative mood, present tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative vice. See Rule i. Us is a personal pronoun, first person plural, in the objective case, and governed by the active verb degrades.

He who lives virtuously prepares for all events. He is a personal pronoun, of the third person, singular number, and masculine gender. Who is a relative pronoun, which has for its antecedent he, with which it agrees in gender and number. Rule 5. Lives a regular verb neuter, indicative mood, present tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative who. Rule 6. Virtuously is an adverb. Prepares a verb neuter, indicative inood, present tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative, he. For is a preposition. All is an adjective pronoun, of the indefinite kind, the plural number, and belongs to its substantire events, with which it agrees. Rule 8. Events is a common substantive of the third person, in the plural number, and the objective case governed by the preposition for. Rule 17.

If folly entice thee, reject its allurements. If is a copulative conjunction. Folly is a common substantive of the third person, in the singular number, and the nominative case. Entice is a verb active, subjunctive mood, present tense, third person singular, and is governed by the conjunction if. Rule 19. Thee is a personal pronoun, of the second person singular, in the objective case, gorerned by the active verb entice. Rule 11. Reject is a regular active verb, imperative mood, second person singilar, and agrees with its nominative case, thou, implied. Its is a personal pronoun, third person, singular number, and the neuter gender, lo agree with its substantive folly. Rule 5. It is in the possessive case, governed by the noun allurements. Rule 10. Allurements is a common substantive, of the neuter gender, the third person, in the plural number, and the objective case, governed by the verb reject. Rule 11.

Several other exercises in prose and verse are here subjoined for the learner's practice.

Prose. Dissimulation in youth is the forerunner of perfidy in old age. Its first appearance is the fatal omen of growing depravity, and future shame.

If we possess not the power of self-government, we shall be the prey of every loose inclination that chances to arise. Pampered by continual indulgence, all our passions will become mutinous and headstrong. Desire, not reason, will be the ruling principle of our conduct.

Absurdly we spend our time in contending about the tri. fles of a day, while we ought to be preparing for a higher existence.

How little do they know of the true happiness of life, who are strangers to that intercourse of good offices and kind affections, which, by a pleasing charm, attaches men to one another, and circulates rational enjoyment from heart to heart.

If we view ourselves, with all our imperfections and failings, in a just light, we shall rather be surprised at our enjoying so many good things, than discontented because there are any which we want.

True cheerfulness makes a man happy in himself, and promotes the happiness of all around him. It is the clear and calm sunshine of a mind illuminated by piety and virtue.

Wherever views of interest, and prospects of return, miagle with the feelings of affection, sensibility acts an imperfect part, and entitles us to small share of commendation.

Let not your expectations from the years that are to come rise too high; and your disappointments will be fewer, and more easily supported.

To live long ought not to be our favourite wish, so much as to live well. By continuing too long on earth, we might only live to witness a greater number of melancholy scenes, and to expose ourselves to a wider compass of human woe.

How many pass away some of the most valuable years of their lives, tost in a whirlpool of what cannot be called pleasure, so much as mere giddiness and folly.

Look 'round you with an attentive eye, and weigh characters well, before you connect yourselves too closely with any who court vour society.

The true honour of man consists not in the multitude of riches, or the elevation of rank; for experience shows, that these may be possessed by the worthless, as well as by the deserving

Beauty of form has often betrayed its possessor. The flower is easily blasted. It is short-lived at the best; and trifling, at any rate, in comparison with the higher, and more lasting beauties of the mind.

A contented temper opens a clear sky, and brightens every object around us. It is in the sullen and dark shade of discontent, that noxious passions, like venomous animals, breed and prey upon the heart.

Thousands whom indolence has sunk into contemptible obscurity, might have come forward to usefulness and honour, if idleness had not frustrated the effect of all their powers.

Sloth is like the slowly-flowing putrid stream, which stagnates in the marsh, breeds venonious animals, and poisonous plants; and infects with pestilential vapours the whole country around it.

Disappointments derange, and overcome vulgar minds. The patient and the wise, by a proper improvement, frequently make their contribute to their high advantage.

Verse.

Vice is a monster of so frightfal mien,
As, to be hated, needs but to be seen :
Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.

If nothing more than purpose in thy power,
Thy purpose firm, is equal to the deed :
Who does the best his circumstance allows,
Does well, acts nobly; angels could no more

To be resign'd when ills betide,
Patient when favours are denied,

And pleas’d with favours giv'n :
Most surely this is Wisdom's part,
This is that incense of the heart,
Whose fragrance smells to heav'o.

).

The spacious firmament on high,
With all the blue ethereal sky,
And spangled heav'ns, a shining frame,
Their great original proclaim:
Th' unwearied sun, from day to day,
Does his Creator's power display,
And publishes to ev'ry land,
The work of an Almighty hand.

Who noble ends by noble means obtains, Or failing, smiles in exile or in chains, Like good Aurelius let him reign, or bleed Like Socrates, that man is great indeed.

Our hearts are fasten'd'to this world,

By strong and endless ties; But

every sorrow cuts a string, And urges us to rise.

Teach me to feel another's woe,

To hide the fault I see ; That mercy I to others show, That inercy

show to me.
This day be bread, and peace, my lot:

All else beneath the sun
Thou knowst if best bestow'd or not,

And let thy will be done.

But soon I found 'twas all a dream ;

And learn'd the fond pursuit to shun, Where few can reach their purpos'd aim,

And thousands daily are undone.

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