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745. PRIDE OF PROFESSION. We are 747. Maria. Her early youth-passed very apt to be fond of that which we excel in away in sorrow: she grew up in tears, a ourselves, and to underrate the acquirements stranger to the amusements of youth, and its and powers of others in a different sphere, more delightful schemes, and imaginations without reflecting that the field of human She was not, however, unhappy; she attribthought and occupation is broad, and that a uted, indeed, no merit to herself for her virman may carefully cultivate one part with-tues, but for that reason-were they the more out being in the least acquainted with the her reward. The peace which passeth all products of another. With what contempt a understanding, disclosed itself in all her skillful musician sometimes regards one who looks, and movements. It lay on her councannot turn a tune, but who, perhaps, is an tenance, like a steady, unshadowed moonexcellent book-keeper, or an adroit ship-light; and her voice, which was naturally at builder!

once sweet and subtle, came from her, like What a conscious pride and pomp of eru- the fine flute-tones of a masterly performer, dition a profound linguist betrays while quo- which, still floating at some uncertain disting familiarly from Homer and Horace, tance, seem to be created by the player, rathDante, or Lopez de Vega, before a simple er than to proceed from the instrument. If student, only master of his mother tongue, you had listened to it, in one of those brief and who in turn sneers at the mistakes made sabbaths of the soul, when the activity and disby others in speaking of natural philosophy cursiveness of the thoughts are suspended, and astronomy. I never sutter myself to be and the mind, quietly eddies round, instead led away thus by a man's accidental accom- of flowing onward--(as at late evening, in the plishments or attainments.

spring, I have seen a bat, wheel in silent cirIf I find a sensible good-hearted fellow (as cles round and round a fruit-tree, in full blosI frequently do, who has never even read som, in the midst of which, as within

a close Milton and Shakspeare, I respect him not- tent, of the purest white, an unseen nightwithstanding; for I say to myself, it is pro- ingale was piping its sweetest notes)--in such bable he is an adept at something besides lit- a mood, you might have half-fancied, half-felt, erature, where perhaps I should require a that her voice had a separate being of its similar indulgence from him.-Fay.

own--that it was a living something, whose 746. ODE FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY.

mode of existence was for the early only:

so deep was resignation, so entirely had I see that banner proudly wave,

it become the unconscious habit of her naYes, proudly waving yet,

ture, and in all she did, or said, so perfectNot a stripe is torn-from the broad array,

ly were both her movements, and her utterNot a single star-is set;

ance, without effort, and without the appearAnd the eagle, with unruffled plume,

ance of effort.—Coleridge. Is soaring aloft-in the welkin dome

748. PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION. Not a leaf-is pluck'd from the branch he bears:

There is a philosophy--hollow, unsound, From his grasp--not an arrow has flown;

To matter-confining its false speculation; The mist-that obstructed his vision-is past,

Whose flight is confind within Nature's dull round, And the murmur of discord-is gone ; (plain,

Its pinions--the web-of sophistic persuasion. For he sees, with a glance over mountain, and And, there's a philosophy-truly Divine, The union--unbroken, from Georgia-to Maine.

That traces effects-to-spiritual causes, Far southward, in that sunny clime,

Determines the link--of the chain where they join, Where bright magnolias bloom,

And soars-to an infinite height-ere it pauses. And the orange-with the lime-tree vies,

That-meanly debases the image of God, In shedding rich perfume,

To rank with the brute-in the scale of creation; A sound was heard-like the ocean's roar,

This-raises the tenant of light-from the sod, As its surges break-on the rocky shore.

And bears him to heaven-his primitive station. Was it the voice-of the tempest loud,

Hail! science---of angels! Theosophy--hail! As it fell dsome lofty tree,

That shows us the regions of bliss by reflection; Or sudden flash-from a passing storm

Removes from creation's broad mirror-the vail, Of heaven's artillery?

Where spirit-and matter appear in comection. But it died away, and the sound of doves It breaks on the soul-in an ocean of light, [ions, Is heard again-in the scented groves.

She starts from her lethargy-stretches her pinThe links are all united still,

Beholds a new world—bursting forth on her sigh, That form the golden chain,

And--soaring in ecstasy--claims her dominions. And peace, and plenty-smile around,

A sense of original, dignified worth, Throughout the wide domain :-

Her bosom expands-with sublime exaltation; How feeble—is language,-how cold—is the lay, She tastes immortality-even on earth, Compar'd with the joy-of this festival day In light, that eclipses-the sun's emanation. To see that banjier-waving yet,

Be sages, and pedants—to nature-confined, [ence; Aye, waving proud, and high,

As the bat-darkly flutters—in Luna's pale presNo rent-in all its ample folds;

I'll soar, 'ike the eagle-thro' regions of mind, No stain--of crimson dye:

In the blaze of that sun—which is truth-in its And the eagle-spreads his pinions fair,

essence.- Woodworth And mounts aloft-in the fields of air.-- James.

The man th't's resolute, and just, Nature, in her productions slow, aspires,

Firm to his principles, and trust, By just degrees, to reach perfection's height. Nor :opes, nor fears, can bind.

A-its Sounds, 17, 18, 19, 20-2-4-7-9; Ab-195; Difference 55, 64 ; Difficulty, 201 ; Discovstract Questions. 134–5 : Action and Reaction, ery of Glass, 78; Disease of the Throat, 149; 82: Accent, 69, 80: Accommodating, 24: Acute Disinterestedness, 158; Diogenes, 17 ; DismissPain, 196 : Admiration, 179, 198: Admonition, ing, 207 ; Distraction, 207 ; Dr. Faustus and the 199, 201 : Advice to a Traveler, 151: Afraid to do Devil, 183; Division of Prose and Poetry, 79, III, 143: Afraid of Work, 80 : Affectation, 202: 164 ; Doctor’m, 38; Down with your Dust, 141 ; Affectuous and Heart, 71 : A Fool, 192: Afirm- Dorsal and Abdominal Muscles, 37; Dr, and Pa. ing, 200: Agriculture, 96: Agrippa's Promise kept, ver, 106 ; Don't know him, 119; Double Mean186: A get off, 33: Alderman's great Toe, 147 : ing, 78; Dotage, 207; Don't Swear, 208 ; Dress, Alexander and the Pirate, 110: All the Pauses, 101'; Dramatic, 153; Drunkard, 113; Draco's 93: All the World a Stage, 154: All the Vowel Laws, 151; Dyspepsia, 104; Dueling, 122; Dusounds, 33 : Amazement, 188, 201: Amusements, ties, 30 ; Dying but once, 81; Dynamics, 140–2; 52: Anecdote on every page : Analysis and Syn- Dying Christian, 123. thesis, 24–9, &c.: Analogies, 27, 72: Anger, 154, E-its Sounds, 21-2-4-9, 57–8, 17; Eat Bacon, 180-2: Anthony's Challenge, 89: Anxiety, 217: 203; Ecstasy, 175; Educators, 25; Education, 18, Application, 102: Appropriate Sign, 148: Archi- 25, 76, 143-7, 162, 180, 236; Effects of Knowtecture, 103 : Arab and Foot-prints, 86 : Arbitra- ledge, 138; Effective style, 162; Effects of Sucry Rules, 162: Articulation, 24, 56 : Arms, 224–9: cess, 204 ; Eliza's wise Choice, 207 ; Elocution, À Scold, 55: Association of Ideas, 169: Aspi- 18, 28, 33-9, 45, 156; Elocutionist, 37; Eloquence, rates, 65 : Attention, 187: Astonishment, 198 : 126, 163-4; Emmet's Betrothed, 76 ; End, Cause, Attitudes, 10, 236 : Au, 25-6: Authority, 44, Effect, 124–8, 132; Emphasis, 98, 118; by Stress, 202: Autumn, 75, 96 : Awkwardness, 237 : Aver- 101-2-3; by Changing it, 102-4-5; by higher Pitch, sion, 179.

106; by Quantity, 107-8-9; by a Pause, 113; B-one Sound, 35: Base Character, 145: Beau- Enjoyment, 94; Eau, Ew, 25; Enunciation, 61 ; ty, Wit and Gold, 142: Beautiful World, 197: Encouraging, 208; Envy, 152; Epitaph, 129; EnBeauty, 136, 154: In the Deep, 164: Be earnest, vy and Jealousy, 166; Earnestness of Manner, 139, 152: Beware of relying too much on Inflec- | 151 ; Error and Truth, 24; Equality, 51; Etertions, 169: Bible, 17, 128, 146: Birth Day, 71 : nal Joy, 28; Eternal Progress, 37 ; Étiquette of Bigots, 102: Blood Globules, 10: Boasting, 210: Stairs, and of Riding, 191; Evening Bells, 27; Blushing, 40: Boards or Sheep, 85: Bound in Ethics, 106 ; _Eve's Lament, 137; Everything calf, not lettered, 220 : Botany, 93: Book-keep- Useful, 214; Eve, 233 ; Experience, 87, 144 ; Exing, 36 : Blundering on the Truth, 72: Boys and clamation, 90; Extemporizing, 138, 156; ExploFrogs, 97: Botany Bay Patriots, 160 : Blindsion and Expulsion, the difference, 26, 63; Exman's Rose, 169 : Blown up Lieutenant, 71 : Bo- tremes, 208; Eyes, 228. dy and Mind, 70: Bonaparte's Check, 52 : Boun F-its Sounds, 42-3; Face, 227; Faults in Ardaries of Knowledge, 56 : Boundless Nature of ticulation, 43; Fatigue, 209; Far West, E8; Feet Oratory, 66 : Book of Nature, 203: Bourdaloue, and Hands, 11, 225-6, 236; Female Education, 171: Braying, 223 : Breathing, 9, 69, 87: Brough- 137 ; Fear, 191 ; Fisherman, 115; Finishing one's am's Eye, 45: Brotherly Love, 190 : Bruce and Studies, 67; Force of Habit, 115 ; Folly and Wisthe Spider, 213 : Brutus, 32: Buffoonery, 204 : dom, 97; Flying from and to the Church, 117; Bunyan's Indictment, 211 : Butterfly, 117. Forehead, 232; Free to do Good, 192; Freedom,

C-its Sounds, 36-7-8-9; Cadence, 139; Catch-28, 78; Franklin's Epitaph, 204; Freedom of ing a Tartar, 27; Causes of Greek Perfection, Thought, 45; Free Schools, 173; Sounds, 63; 27 ; Cause and Effect, 32, 99; Census of 1840, Frederick the Great, 47 ; Friendship, 171 ; Free156 ; Ch. 37-9, 59; Changes, 40; Change, of Ac- dom of the Press, 148; Forming Theories, 232; cent, 71-2; Characteristics of Man, 119; Chil- Fright, 183; Fury, 180. dren and Animals, 121 ; Chinese, 33; Chinese G-its Sounds, 44-5-6; Gambling. 153; Gener. Physicians, 136; Cheerfulness, 172 ; Child of al Intelligence, 23; Geography, 101; Garrick Promise, 198; Christian Character, 53; Choice 175, 224; he sat_fór Fielding's portrait, 219; of a Husband, 135; Chemistry, 95; Cicero, 32, Gentleman and Tenant, 88; Genius, 219; Ges. 74, 118, 166, 2:33; Clay, 149 ; Clemency to Ruffi- tures, 231; Gh, 42-5; Giving, Granting, 210; ans, 210, 215; Clergyman in Lent, 63; Classifica- Glottis, 11 ; Goblin full of Wrath, 126 ; Good tion of Consonants, 64-5-7-8; Client's Bones, Sense, 84 ; Goodness of Providence, 81 ; Good 145 ; Cobler, 122; Colon, 87; Colonel, his own Works, 126; Goldsmith's Gold Pill. 121 ; Good trumpeter, 118; Coincidences, 87; Coinbina- Name, 128; Good Example, 149 ; Government, tions of Waves, 130; Common Opinions, 55; 116, 139; Grand Objects, 56; Gradations, 50; Common Sense, 107; Compassion, 117, 123: Com- Gratitude, 163, 211; Gravity, 209 : Greek and pressions and Contractions, 21 ; Commendation, Irish, 101 ; Great Mistake, 231 ; Grief, 184, 213; 205 ; Conciseness, 164; Conduct towards Swear- Grumblers, 151 ; ers, 125 ; Confidence,-Courage, 210; Confine H–47, 62-3-5-8; Half Murder, 127; Hamlet's ment of Debtors, 139 ; Contentment, 83; Con- Instructions on Delivery, 157; Hands and Feet, quering Love, 168; Conjunction, 168; Contrary, 11, 224-9; Habits of Thought, 19; Habits, 29; 157 ; Cons derate Minister, 46 ; Contempt, 190; Hatred. 179, 182; Happiness, 204 ; Hard QuesConstruction of Houses, 105; Contrasts, 33; Con- tions, 223; Harrison and Sunday School Teachsonant Sounds, 35; Constitutional Law, 115 ; er, 41; Half Mourning, 61 ; Hally and Newton, Cottage for the Poor, 226 ; Cure for Sore Eyes, 65; Heart and Lungs, 10; Head, 227 : Ilanging 223 ; Curran, 19; his Daughter, 76.

for Fashion's Sake, 91; Hearing and Speaking, D-its Sounds, 40-1; Day of Life, 84; Dandy 168; Heathens going to Heaven, 133 ; Historian, Officer, 155: Dandies and Puppies, 221 ; Danger- 194 ; Too High or too low, 133; Home, 41, 166 ; ous Biting, 76; Dangers of bad Company, 131 ; Hope, 157, 178; Honesty, 174; Honor, 49, 193, Dear Wife, 28; Delivery and Painting, 94; 209; Howard, 59, 25, 226; Hoarseness-Cause, Death of a Heari-Friend, 97 ; Dead and Living and Cure. 62; Horticulture, 98: Holding one's Temples, 201 ; Deformed Chest, 9; Debt, 118; own, 69; Horace, 74; How to Prize good ForDeceiver, 145; Declamatory and Hortatory, 153; tune, 209 ; How to Succeed, 146, 236; How to Dead Languages, 221 ; Departed Year, 45; Death get rid of Admirers, 149; How to produce Sounds, and Idleness, 1:37 : Demosthenes, 32, 74, 145, 166, 18; Human Form Clothed, 8; l'uman Nature, 233 ; Denying, 206 ; Despair, 185, 213; Delight, 178; Human Testimony, 181; Humbugs, 108 ; 173; Despotism, 126 ; Delivery, 150-8; Dia- Humanity Rewarded, 33. phragm, 10; Devotion, 189; Desire, 178; Dia I-its Sounds, 23-4; 21-2-9, 58: Important tonic Scale, 34, 154 ; Diphthongs, 31-2 ; Discre- Considerations, 73, 108; Ideas, 159 ; Ignorance tion, 177 ; Discovery of a Beauty, 229; Disobe and Error, 160-9; and Willfulness, 161 : Impa. dience to Deceased Parents, 227; Dissimulation, I tience, 210'; Importance of Early Principles 158;

318

CONTENTS OF THE PRINCIPLES OF ELOCUTION. Imagination, 166 : Inadequacy of Language, 85; | Orator's Field, 165-how they are made, 68; Ori. Independence Forever, 104, 132; Indian Virtue, gin of Language, 66; Oratorical and Poetical 235; Injuring Others, 205; Inflections, 119, 125, Actions and Gestures, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16; and 169; Inducing Disease, 127 ; Influence, 79, 160; from 172 onwards; Orthography, 64-5-6-7, 81 ; Importance of Observation, 80; Inconsistency, One Thing at a Time, 114; Orihoepy, 81 ; ou, 145; Industry, 99, 164; Innocent and Guilty, 2; 26 ; Ou and Ow, 32; Osseus or Bony System,7; In the Truth, 48; Interrogation, 89; Intellectual, Our Country, 151; Our Food, 31 ; Our Book, 237; 71; Intentions, 71; Intuition, 157; Invalds, 122; selves and others, 43; Our Sight, 134. Involuntary efforts, 99; Investigation of Thought, P-52; Parenthesis, 91 ; Party Spirit, 35; Pa. 190; Irresolution, 172, 217; It looked so Pretty, tience and Perseverance, 42; Patrick Henry's 129.

Treason, 143; Passions and Actions, 170-1, 206, J-its Sounds, 44,58; Jaw Breakers, 61, and 212; Pardoning, 217; Patience won't have me, from 17–62; Jealousy, 214, 224; Joy, 113; Jolly 66; Parish Clerk and the Banns, 81; Painting, Laughter, 174; Judging, 215; Jury and the Liar, 208; Painter and the King, 92; Patriots, 133; 120; Justice, 92; Just Aristides, 134.

Pelayo, 186 ; Pauses, 85, &c.; Period, 88; PerseK-iis Sound, 37; Keel Hauling. 75; Keeping verance, 146; Perplexity, 217; Peter the Great Time from Eternity, 64 ; King and his Fool, 231; 217; Peter Pricker Prandle, 52; Philosophy of Kinds of Poetry, 91; King of Poland in France, Mind, 98, 123, &c.; Philosopher Outdone, 195; 207; King's Evil, 31; Kingly Dinner, 151; Kings Philosophy, 121 ; Physiological Ignorance, 203; and their Trade, 156; Kirwan, 27; Known by the Phrenology. 228; Philosophy and Love. 57 ; Play Fruits, 77 ; Kosciusko, 96.

on Words, 174; Perspiration, &c., 8; Pitch, 123, L-48; Labor, 72; Language (two kinds), 21; 143-4-7; Pitt, 31, 88; Ph, 42-3; Pleasures of Laconics, often; Law, 109; Last words of Mar- Piety, 217; Plato, 17; Play on X's, 56 ; Poor mion, 115; Lafayette, 94; Language of Feeling, Priest and the King at Prayer, 208; Political 222 ; Laughing Scientifically, 77; Lawyer's liat, Economy, 111; Position of Body, 17; Polyglot of 22; Lawyers Mistake, 29; Lawyer and Physi- Body and Mind, 230; Poisoned Cup and Cyrus; cian, 90; Lawyer and Client, 107, 176; Learning, 188; Pioneers, 150; Position in Bed. 79; Polite148; Legendary Tales, 106; Listening, 187; Liv ness, 142 ; Polycarp and his Lord, 153; Poor ing Temples, 89: Lisping, 36 ; Logic, 156; Loins Fund, 200'; Point of Law, 132 ; Pope and the ?, of the Mind, 63; Look at Home, 175; Lost Purse, 159 ; Pots and all gone, 173; Principles of Elo206; Long Enough, 49; Lord Thurlow's Speech cution, from 17—237 ; Prejudice, 140; Precept from the Woolsack, 200; Love, 176, 187, 189, 217; and Example, 141 ; Precipitancy, 62; Pride, 154, Love of Justice, 186; Love and Liberty, 140; 218, 219 ; Prize of Immortality, 184; Preceding Love and Alcohol, 125; Love on the Scaffold, Principles, 125, &c.; Position of Feet and Hands, 232; Love and the Stars, 109: Lovely Qualities, 11 ; Progress of society, 119; Prayer to the Con233; Luxury, 171; Lying, 155; Lycurgus, 51 ; gregation, 39; Proverbs on every page ; PromLyceums, 143.

ises, 124 ; Promising, 219; Principal and InterM–49; Management of the Breath, 97; Man est, 59; Powerful Stimulus, 145; Punning, 172; a Microcosm, 88, 203; Making Resolutions, 203 ; | Pronunciation, 81, 84; Provincialisms, 83; ProMadness, 231; Making Game of a Lady, 113; longation of Sound, 70, 73; Providence, 117; PiMaterial of all Sounds, 47; Means of Happiness, ty, 177, 225, 83; Public Speakers should live long; 95; Mahomet and the Hill, 112; Malice, 216; est, 149; Pursuit of Knowledge, 168; Pupil and Matter and Manner, 50, 131, 158, 161; Mathe- Apprentice, 46 ; Pulpit and Theatres. 132; Punc. matics, 54; Mark to Hit, 113; Means of getting tual Hearers, 139 ; Punishments, 218; Pulpit a Living, 105; Mediums, 20-1'; Male and Female Flattery, 189; Pungent Preaching, 212. Voices, 147; Maxims, everywhere ; Mercy, 177 ; Q-37; Quack, 82: Qualifications of TeachMathematical Honor, 68; Matrimony, 56; Melers, 20: Quaker' Presents, 199 : Qualities. 22: ancholy, 216; Means to be used, 19; Men and Quantity, 70: Qualities of Voice, 140, 142: QuaBrutes, 38; Merchants and Pigeons, 111; Men- ker and soldier, 128: Question Direct, 89: ta! Violence, 57; Mediocrity, 137; Melody, 135–6; Queen's Reprimand to her Daughter, 224 : Miser, 87; Mineralogy, 91; Mirth, 174; Minor Queen Elizabeth and her Ladies, 195: QuincPassions, 199; Ministry of Angels, 171 ; Mock tillian, 229. Trial of a King, 205; Moon Eclipsed. 93; Mono R—53-4: Rainbow, 175: Ranges of Voice, tone, 119; Mourners, 187 ; Movement of Voice, 134 : Raising Rent, 70: Rage, 180: Rapture, 175: 138; Modulation, 143-4; Modes of Spelling, 67; Reading, 33, 57, 103, 120: Reading Rooms, 46: Mother's Injunction and Bible, 82; Mouthing, Range of Knowledge, 66: Railery, 192, 220: 116; Mother perishing in a Snow Storm, 111; Reasoning, 202: Recitations, 166 : from 237–316: Mother and Daughter in Prison, 185; Modesty, Recipients, 32: Reading by vowel sounds, 33 : 218, 223; Mouth, 229; Mr. Psalter. 36; Music, Religious Persecutions. 187: Reading Discours101, 163,-4-5; Mummy, 23; Muscle Breakers, 43, es, 71 : Remorse, 184, 220: Refusing, 219: Rea52, and among the Letters; My Mother, 210; son, 131, 227 : Reproach, 182: Reproving, 221 : Musical Pun, 34; Muscular System, 7; Muscular Revision, 117: Refinement, 93: Rhetoric. 156 : Action, 9, and elsewhere; Mutual Mistake, 89. Rhetorical Pause, 92, 108: Rhetorical Action,

N-50-1; Nature always True, 159, 205; Nat-234 : Reforms. 164 : Riches and Talent, 132 : ural Theology, 90; Nature and Art, 151 ; Natu- Right Views, 50: Rythm, 96: Rhymetry and ralists and Realists, 137; Narrow Escape, 25; the Queen, 12:3. kula's Address to the PeruNatural Philosophy, 25; Natural Death, 42 ; Nat- vians, 153: Rhyme, 167: Rose, 72: Revenge, ural and Spiritual, 18; Natural History, 86, Nail 181 : Ruined Debtor's satisfaction, 179: Rumand Fortune's Wheel, 167; Niagara Falls, 167; New Grave Stones, 44 : Rouge, 168: Routes, 216. Character, 99; New Field, 68; Nerves of Or S-36-8-9, 42, 46: Sadness and Sorrow, 186: ganic Life, 5 of Motion and sense, 6–of Res- Safe now, 222 : Satan's Speech, 169: Saving piration, 6; Ng, 51 ; Nobleman and Beggar Boy, Fuel, 20 : Sailor and Countess' Eyes, 35: Sailor 191 ; Newton and his Dog, 225; Nothing True and Highwayman, 114: Semi-colon, 86 : Science, but Heaven, 189; Nothing from Nothing, 167; 114: Scientific Enthusiasm, 181 : Servile ImitaNumber, 155; Nursery, 39.

tion, 182: Seasons, 28: Selfishness, 128, 163: 0-25–6–7; 19. 24-9, 30, 57; Obeying Orders, Scorn, 190, 222: Seeing Right, 220 : Seeing a 146; Observe, 205; Oi and Oy, 31 ; old and New Wind, 23: Self-love, 73: Sea Lawyers, 77: Methods of Spelling, 65-6-7; Old Habits, 124; Sense governs, 129 : Sheridan, 107 : Shouting, Only way to teach Reading, 169; Only Natural | 115: School Teachers, 130: Bight Reading, 57: Sound, 18; and Notes on, 47; One Tongne Skips and Slides. 167 : Shame, 223: Schoolmasenough, 48; Opening the Mouth, 110; Operating ter and Pupils, 43 : Shorp Reply, 163 : Slander, Circumstances, 162; Oratory, 27, 74, 110, 156; 1 139: Slender Voice, 155: Sinking in the Sto

mach, 92 ; Sounds, 22; Simple Laughter, 192 ; Simple Bodily Pain, quillity, 172: Tweedledum and Tweedledee, 228 : The Feet, 174: 195; Speculation like a Cold Bath, 144; Strong Points, 106; Stand. Twilight Dews, 193: Thou art, O God, 188: The Rose, 72: The ing, 22; Starry Firmament (Addison), 46; Strength of Voice, 145; Union, 55. Society owes all a Living, 63 ; Sources of Faults, 235; Socrates U-28-9, 30, 22, 24, 55, 58: Ugly Dreams, 165: Unaccented and the Tyrants, 102 ; Speaking the Gauntlet, 116; Student's Poe. Vowels, 75: Uncertain quantity of Wine, 62: Unwelcome Visitor, try, 116; Sommerfield and the Bishop, 138 ; Standard of Speaking, 74: Use of Spelling, 68. 152; Sterling Integrity, 154, Style, 148, 151-9, 160-1–2; Stress,

V-43: Vanity Reproved, 162: Vain Mother, 58: Varieties op 67; Sublimity and Pathos, 22; Striking out Beauties, 177 ; Stage

every page : Veneration, 189, 226 : Ventriloquism, 60: Vehemence Regulator, 178; Sowing and Reaping, 180; Suggestions, 154, 235; of Action, 232 : Views of Truth, 211: Virtue the best Treasure, 222: Surnuise, 215; Suspicion, 224; Stupidity, 30; Stretch of Thought,

Virtue before Riches, 160: Virtuous Friendship, 237: Vexation, 231; Spinsters, 54; Successful Speaker, 128; Swiss Retort, 127;

227: Voice, 166 ; Vocal Organs, 11; Vocal Gymnastics, 23. Swearing King, 103; Standing, 22; Swearing, 167; Surprise, 188, 223; Stages of Progress, 170

W–56, 26; Warren's Address at the Battle of Bunker Hill, T-39, 41; Talent, 120; Tale of Wonder, 226; Tallow and

paraphrased, 57; War and Truth, 90; Washington and Mother,

194; and W. and the U.S., 100; Wh, 62; What is Ours, 61; Wet Talent, 158; Telling Stories, 78; To teach Children, 109; Tele

Minister, 18 ; What a Bug! 226; Waves or Circumflexes, 130—3; scope, 91; Terror, 183, 225, 231; Temperance, 198; Teaching,

Weeping Emperor, 218; What the Youth had learned, 115; Who 225; Theology, 19; Tendency of our Language, 157; Theatres,

is wrong in the Argument, 122; What for? 150; We love them 174; Thinking, 175; Thought and Feeling, 114; Thats, 49; This

so, 60; Who rules? 53; Whitfield Rambling, 50; Wm. Penn, 37; tle Sifter, 60; True Wisdom, 34; Triphthongs, 32: Three Essen

Wirt, 150; Windpipe, &c., 11; Wife, 153; Wild Oats, 19; Win tials in all things, 51: Th, 60—1, True Empire, 76 : Three De

ter Evenings, 62; Wisdom of our Ancestors, 129: Weeping, 194 grees of Speech, 112: Three modes of Existence, 121: Thorax,

William and Lucy, 194: Word Painting, 95, 139, 142: Whipped 9: Tight Dressing, 9: These are my Jewels, 196: Time in Man, 166 : Truth, 171, 192: True Happiness, 172: This World, 202 :

for making Rhymes, 191: Words, 20: Worth, 65: Woman, 75,

133, 136, 152: Wonder, 188, 226: Woman as she should be, 32: A fleeting show, 189; True Eloquence, 209: To act a Passion, 212:

Working a Passage, 98 : Wrong Choice, 47: Written Language, Too common, 221: True Modesty, 21: To and The, 57: Tough

53–4: World not all a fleeting show, 85: Written Page, 230. Animal, 79: Truths not Fictions, 170: Too hard, 142: Truth and Nature, 130: To prevent Suicide, 108: Turn Bread into Stones,

X-Pages 56, 57, 63, 64, 65, and 38. 202: Tyrolese Songs, 234: Transition, 146 : True Philosophy, 135:

Y_Pages 58, 22, 23, 24, 29, 63, 64. To succeed, 146: Tremor of Voice, 156 : Try again, 156 : Tran

Z_Pages 38, 46, 63, 67: Z0-01-0-69, 7, 104.

CONTENTS OF READINGS AND RECITATIONS.

A-Accomplished Young Lady, 261; Adams and Jefferson, 273; house (Lewis), 270; Maria taking the Vail, 314; Maria (ColeAdvantages of Knowledge, 291; Adherence to Truth, 270; Against ridge), 316; Marco Bozzarris, 267; Majesty of the Law, 293; Mathe American War, 243; Alexander Selkirk (Cowper), 295; Alex ternal" Affection, 303; Military Insubordination (Clay), 271, Modander's Feast, 315; Alexander at Olympia Games, 230; Antony's ulation, 285; Moloch's Oration for War, 308; Marseilles Hymn Oration over Cæsar, 252; America, 277, 280; American Flag, 288; of Liberty, 292; Moonlight and Battlefield, 255; My Country, Aspirations of Youth, 246; Atheist and Acorn, 250.

250 ; Moral Effects of Intenperance, 240; Mother's Love, 237. B-Baron's Last Banquet, 289; Basque Girl, or Love's Sacrifice, N-National Glory, 241; National Union, 250 ; Natural Histo 813; Balance of Happiness, 239; Battle Field, 242; Battle of Wa. ry of Love, 264; Nature's Wants are few, 284; Nature of True terloo, 264; Beggar's Petition, 275; Benefits of Agriculture, 288; Eloquence, 286; Needle (Woodworth), 272; Night Scene in Beauties of Nature, 302; Best Cure for Trouble, 300; Best of Turkey, 246 ; New Year, 279; No excellence without Labor, 305; Wives, 314; Burr and Blannerhassett, 268; Brutus Harangue on Nobility of Labor, 266; Nose and the Man, 265. the death of Cæsar, 261; Burial of Sir John Moore, 242; By. 0-Ode on the Passions (Collins), 249; Ode for the 4th of July, ron's Apostrophe to the Ocean, 263.

316; Of Elocution, 244 ; Old Oaken Bucket (Woodworth), 256; C-Cato's Senate, 276 : his Soliloquy, 310; Cassius against Cze Old Hat, 296; Orator Puff, 315; Ossian's Address to the Moon, kr, 242; Character of Woman, 248; of Pitt, 297 ; of Bonaparte, 241; Do. to the Sun, 244; Othello's Apology for Marrying, 296. 302; Changing and Unchanging, 239, Chestnut Horse, 249; Char. Our Country, 240; Our Toils and their Reward, 238. ity, 261; Cicero against Verres, 308; Constancy of Woman, 295 ; P-Parts of the Whole, 238; Parrhasius and the Olynthian CapCoral Grove, 260 ; Cure for Hard Times, 285.

tive (Willis), 274; Patrick Henry's Speech, setting in motion the D_David's Lament over Absalom (Willis), 266; Darkness (By: ball of the Revolution, 277 ; Passing the Rubicon, 290; Passage mon), 258; Deserted Wife, 304; Dew Drop, 291; Destruction of of the Red Sea (Heber), 286; Patriotic Triumph, 263; Peace Senacharib's Army (Byron), 240; Dignity of Human Nature, 305; and War contrasted, (Hall) 257; Perfect Orator, 279 ; Perry's VicDisappointed Ambition, 240; Doctor and his hopeful Pupil, 293 tory on Lake Erie, 260; Physical Education, 284; Philosophy and Duty of American Citizens, 311; Douglas' Account of himself, 244 Religion, 316; Pilgrims and their Destiny, 312 ; Play-place of early

É-Education, 278; Emmet's Vindication, in full, 306; Eulo- days, 276 ; Political Corruption, 310; Power of Eloquence Carey), gium on the South (Hayne), 254; Do. on the North (Webster,) 280 ; Press on, 246 ; Pride of Profession, 316; Progress of Liberty, 264; Eulogium on Kosciusko, 298; Eve's Love for Adam, 294 256 ; of Government, 290 ; Public Faith, 309. Exile of Erin, 273; Eyes, 279.

Q-Queen Mab (Shakspeare), 289. F-Fall of Beauty, 314; Fancied Infallibility, 238; Female R_Razor Seller, 271; Rainy Day, 239; Rejected, 304; Respect Character, 295; Fever Dream, 265; Fireside Happiness, 285; to Old Age, 282; Recitations, instead of Theatres (Dr. Channing), Flight of Xerxes, 241; Fortune Teller, 282; Footsteps of Angels, 264; Resurrection of the Lord (Hardie), 292 ; Richard III., 304"} 278; Freeman, 301; Frenchnian and his Host, 281.

Right of Free Discussion (Webster), 256. G-Gambler's Wife, 257; Goodness of God, 256 ; Games, 259; S_Sailor Boy's Dream, 262; Serpent of the Still, 253; She walks Ginevra, or Lost Bride Rogers), 272; Gentleness, 246; Genuine in Bcauty (Byron), 238 ; Ship, 241, Slander, 260, 294, 311; Soul's Taste, 257; God in Nature, 276 : Good Night (Sands), 282; Groves Defiance, 286 ; Speech of Belial, 275; of Cataline, 293 ; Spirit of God's first Temples (Bryant), 283; Grave of the Renowned, 310; British Law, 271; Star of Bethlehem, 294 ; Stag Chase (scnti), 284; Greek Literature, 287.

Stream of Life, 296 ; Sublimity of Mountain Scenery, 250; Swear. H-Hannibal to his Soldiers, 247; Home, 313; Human Life, ing nobly reproved,'193. 809; Hypocrite (Pollok ), 273.

T-Talents always Ascendant, 269; Thanatopsis (Bryant), 287; I_Immortality of the Soul (Addison), 238; Indian Language, Thunder Storm on the Alps, 303 ; Three Black Crows, 259; Thé 292; Immortal Mind, 257; Improvement of the Mind, 248; In.

Whiskers, 243; The Hermit (Beattie), 247; The Murderer Knapp dian Names, 248 ; Influence of the Wise and Good, 309; Infant (Webster), 251; Tit for Tat, or Coquetry Punished Woodworth, Sleeping in a Garden, 239; Industry and Eloquence, 301; Invalid 263 ; Tribute to Penn, 312; Do. to Washington, 287; To Mary in Abroad, 252.

Heaven (Burns), 303 ; To-day and To-morrow, 307; True FriendJ-John Adams' Speech, on adopting the Declaration of Indeship, 260. pendence, 245; Justice, 240.

V-Victim Bride and Miser (Harrison), 291; Village Black. L-land of Rest, 278; Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers, 311;

smith (Longfellow), 299; Vulture and Captive Infant, 247. Lay of the Madman, 300, Liberty and Union, 255; Life is Real, W-Way to be Happy, 278; Wilderness of Mind (Osborne), 806; Life of a Drunkari, 253 ; Lord Ullin's Daughter, 290; Loch 258 ; Wife, Children and Friends, (Spenser), 279; Woolsey's Solis invar (Scott), 297; Locke, 293 ; Loss of National Character, 282; oquy on Ambition, 312; World at a Distance [Cowper), 253; Lucy, 307.

World to Come, 280. M-Maid of Malahide, 267; Maniac, a scene in a Private Mad.

Y-Youth and Age, 289.

References and Testimonials. subject; his instructions are of vast importance to Extract- From the Faculty of the Hanover Col. public speakers. His appearance, his manner, his lege, Ia. Ilaviag

attended Prof. Bronson's prelec voice, anil his mode of treating the subject of Elotions to the students of this College, in the art or cution, are altogether original. His Recitations are Elocution, we take great pleasure in bearing testi. well done, and give an agreeable variety to the Lecmony, no less to his laborious fidelity to his pupils, tures. His Instructions must prove of immense than to the soundness of his principles, and his own

value. thorough acquaintance with the subject he professes EXTRACT—From the Lexington, Ky. Intelligencer. to teach. Mr. Bronson is no charleta in his pro- Reader, do you ever spend money for sperfluities, fession. Not content with communicating abstract such as balls, circuses, menageries or theatres? If knowledge, nor with exhibiting his own power of so, we are not going quarrel with you, or criticise applying that knowledge, his great aim seems to be your taste. But we are about to say, that a source -to make the student a practical Elocutionist. We of amusement, cheaper, more intellectual, more most cheerfully recommend him to the patronage decidely improving, and at the same time únques. of an enlightened public; and, especially, to the tionably innocent and entertaining, is presented in patrons of public Institutions of Learning. the Lectures on Elocution and Music now in pro

EXTRACT - From the Committee of the classes at gress by Professor Bronson. Princeton Theological Seminary. We take plea.. Prof. BRONSON is evidently master of his professure in expressing our approbation of the principlession: he not only understands Oratory theoretically of Prof. Bronson's system, and the manner in and practically, but possesses a most happy faculty which he inculcates them in his practical Lectures. of teaching it. Those who are fond of splendid His model is NATURE ; and therefore, his primary specimens of Elocution should not fail of attending object is to bring into active operation all those or- these Lectures. The knowledge obtained from this gans which nature designed to be employed in the system is especially necessary for Mothers, and production of vocal sounds. This object once at those who have the training of children, or the tained, the beneficial consequences, which follow, teaching of vocal music.—Daily Democrat, (Roare numerous; and, to the Public Speaker, inval-chester,) N. Y. uable. Articulation becomes easy and distinct, the

The mere announcement of Prof. Bronson's Lec. voice acquires increased clearness, strength, flexi

tures and Recitations, will be sufficient, in Trenton, bility and compass and exhaustion, arising from protracted vocal labor, is avoided together with to draw a large audience.-N. J. State Gazette. inflamation of the lungs, and BRONCHITIS—those Among the professors of Elocution of the present fearful forms of disease, which darken the prospects day, perhaps no one has attained the fame of Mr. and curtail the usefulness of so many at the present Bronson. He understands the art of speaking theo. day. Mr. B's oral instruction is entirely practical, retically and practically--medically and philoloand well calculated to verify the truth of his theory. gically-in every shape and in every form. Such We all join in expressing our high approbation of varied qualifications as he possesses are rarely his system, and our firin conviction that it is well found, and all who read the Herald should hear worthy the attention of all who aim at becoming him.-N. Y Herald. good singers, Readers, or public Speakers.

Professor Bronson's lectures have been listened Extract. From the Classes in the Miami Uni- to by crowded audiences. He has been compelled, versity, Ohio. We take pleasure in expressing our for want of room to leave Masonic Hall, and occu entire satisfaction with him as a teacher, and of his py the Westininister Street Chapel.-Prov. R. I. mode of instruction. By this analysis and exposi. Journal. tion of the elementary principles of language, he EXTRACT.-From a letter by MR. LOWELL places within the hands of his pupils a Key to their MASON, Boston, a celebrated composer and teafaults, together with a definite mode of correcting cher of Music. them, and guiding their further efforts to improve " As far as I can judge of your principles, I apin the art of Elocution. By his faithful attention, prove; they appear to me to be founded in truth he has succeeded in giving entire satisfaction to all and nature. I have introduced something of your who have attended his Lectures. Being convinced system into my classes. Knowing what I now that his plan is founded upon correct philosophical know, I should certainly give the money right over principles, and is adequate to the accomplishment again for the knowledge I acquired; yes, double, of its professed object,--and having every con- were it necessary. Could I command the time i fidence in his capability and faithfullness, we cheer-should like to pursue the study much longer with fully recommend Prof. Bronson to all to whom he you; but what I have already acquired I consider may offer his services, as a competent teacher offiighly important, and you have my THANKS as well Llocution.

as my MONEY." EXTRACT.-From some of the Professors in

EXTRACT.-From the Journal of Commerce, NY: Rutger's College, New Brunswick, N. J.-Having Mr. Bronson is certainly one of ihe most original attended Professor Bronson's Course of Lectures, and entertaining men with whom we meet. He we cheerfully bear witness to his COMPETENCY and treats on all matters relating to sound, and its or. faithfulness as an instructor; and are well satis- gans, and illustrates his principles by examples of fied that his system of discipline, if duly followed singing and rhetorical rehearsal of a high charac up, cannot fail to impart distinctness of articula- ter. tion, with an easy and impressive elocution.

The Recitations of Prof. Bronson were received Extract —From the students of Jefferson Col- with great satisfaction, by one of the largest assem lege, Canonsburgh, Pa.-We take this opportunity blies that we have ever seen in College Hall. NO of expressing our approbation of Prof. Bronson's author need ask more, than to have the delicate system, and of his capability to instruct others in touches of his fancy, and the hidden meaning of his this most important art. He is a perfect master of thought, brought out by the professor. - Cincinall he teaches, and the principles on which he bases nati Daily Gazette. his instructions are so accordant with Philosophy Prof. Bronson's Lectures and Recitations have and common sense, as to recommend them to the been received with decided favor in almost every approval of every admirer of elegant enunciation, City in the Union, and in our principal Towns and either in Reuding or Oratory, We recommend and Literary Institutions.

We heard him somo him to all persons who feel desirious of acquiring years since, and derived much instructions and pro the art of Reading and Speaking with science and fit from his original theory of the Human Voice; of effect.

the means of strengthening and perfecting it, and a From the Mercantile Journal, Boston. We have curing the prevalent diseases of the vocal organs no doubt but that Prof. Bronson is master of his Bronchitis, &c. N. Y. Daily Mribune.

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