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you are industrions and good; for God will be your consta
friend at all times, and he will put it into ibe heart of gve
people to help you in time of peed.

Ball and the grey mare drew the plough, he guided it and sung a song. At noon he fed poor Ball and the mara

meal at home; then he went to work once more, and le with two black eyes. I will teach your tobim home

43 boy would play with him and as for work, he would do none if he could help it. When he grew to be a man, he spent his time with men like himself: and they would fight and box;

at last one gave him a blow that was the death of him. STORY IV.

Questions.---What faults was Ned Jenks guilty of? [Ans. There was a boy whose name was John Pape ; be had bers

Fighting and calling names.] Are

Are not quarrelsome boys very taught to beg in the streets too; the same gentleman wh

disagreeable? [Ans. Yes.] Do not they sometimes get a good spoke to Bob Hearn, told John Pope, he would take himu

bangiug? (Ans. Yes,) Was not Ned Jenks served right? ? the school if he would go and be made clean; so the cert

[ins. Yes.] Did he not look very foolish with his two

black d.ty John Pope went with his face and hands clean

, and li

eyes when he thought to have had every thing his own bair smooth, and said to his new friend, " Pray Sir, take a

way ? [Ans. Yes.) Was it not very wicked in bini to knock

another boy's teeth oat on purpose? [Ans. Yes.] to school." “ That I will, my good lad," said the Geulis Instruction ---Never give way to a quarrelsome disposition, mai; so he went with him to school : when Jobn saw boys. less than limself hard at vor

for if you do so you will displease God, and become very work, and some at their book

disagrecable to every body. It should be your constant endea .
" Dear me," said he," this is nice; I will not beg in the your to live in peace with every body,
streets now;

I will learn to work anit read soo. How could
Bob Hearn be such a fool, as to choose to beg in the stres

STORY VI.
when he might have come here, and learnt to do such thing
as these :" If you think Bob Hearn to blame," said til * Poor Hodge Gray got up at five o'clock, and when he lad
friend, “mind the rules of the school, and be a good bos put on his clothes he took the old horse Ball, and the old
and make what friends you can.” Jack was a good boy, al grey mare, and went to the field to plough it.

At eight o'clock he went home and cat his bread and cheese, and found the best thing he could have done was to go to school.

dravk his pint of beer, and then to the field once more; while Questions.---What did John Pope choose to do when he met with a friend, instead of going a begging? [Ani , Gou

and school. Did he not take a good choice for himself ? [Ans

. Yes
!

gave them driok, and let then rest while he made a a good Instruction ---By this story you see the advantage of leaving

did his work well, for he would not cheat for all the world, Wher be had done work at night he put by bis plough, and led poor Ball and the n

niare home, and gave them bay and corn, and then he took his own rest. He had not such a liard heart as to beat poor dumb beasts, and keep them from food and drink for a great while, as is the way with some folk.

Questions -- Was not Hodge Gray a very good boy? [Ans. Yes.] Did he lia abed of a morning when he ought to have been up at his work! [Ans. No:} Did he grumble and fret because it was his lot to work hard ? [Ans. No.] How did he use the poor beasts that were under bis care ? [ Ans. Kindly:] Did he beat and bang them about as if they had no feeling (Ans. No.} Did be let them gotwithout food ? [Anti No.} Did lie cheat his master hy playing in de bours he was paid for working[xlns, Na] 11:45

"yold 021 Instruction,--elf: ever you are employed to work for a

off an idle, or a scandalous course of life, for å useful and creditable one. A boy who resolves to be a beggar is despised: one who takes up an honest employment is commended. * sides all this, God abhors idleness and begging, and bless honest industry.

STORY V. Ned Jenks was, a boy that would fight with all the boys that came in his way, if they said a word that he did not like nay, if they did but look at him or touch bim by chatice * iVbat do you look at 'me for" he would say; or," when Jo you touch me?" and then he would call names and gire

great blow. One day he beat' our two of George Bluat's (eech this way, George did not like to have bis iceth best Out: so, he fell on Ned and beat bim,

and

knock teeth ou!," said. Georgen Ned Jenks went on this way till not a

bless you.

- Now

rad a brush to brush them and his bar when he put ther gentleman or a farmer, follow the example of Hodg Rise early of a morning, follow your daily task with ing mind and a cheerful heart, use the poor beasts and act honestly in all things: then you will have conscience, which will

I make you happier than all thi in the world can make you with a troubled one, for

STORY VII. Dick Grange had a dog, the name of which was and a good dog Dash was, før he would not gruwl, or snap, or bite, but would go with Dick Grange, il but say Dash ! Dash! and yet this sad boy would be Dash, and make him howl and whine 'so, it woul made your heart ache to hear him; and he would ti to his tail, which made poor Dash run as if he wa One day a man caught Dick Grange, and hung a grea to his hair, and beat him as hard as he could. he, how do you feel? will you serve a poor dumb bea !! O no, no," said Dick; pray let me go, and I will to' poor Dash.” So ihe man let him go.

Questions.--.Don't you think it was very cruel to use dumb beast as Dick Grange did ? [ Ans. Yes.]. Are n very faithful creatures ? [Ans. Yes.] Don't you think 'be very painful to a poor dog to be served as Dash was Yes.] Did not Dick look very foolish with the stone his hair? [-Ins. Yes.] Was he not rightly served ? Yes.]

Instruction.---Learn from this story to consider tha beasts have feelings as well as you; that it is very c hurt any creature for sport; that even a dog may find a to take its part ; and, above all, remember that all th (ures in the world are God's creatures. God created one of them; and he will not be pleased with those w *them cruelly.

actions ':00 -40 STORY VIII 1912, listi luu Jack Spruce was a neat boy;

boy; ně kept his clothes clea 3 He not run in

splash his legs, or ofeet and spoil bis shoes, nor did he try'tò kick the dust de ran in ihe road just for the sake of fiin. He Knete

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boy would play with bim : and as for work, he would do none if he could help it. When he grew to be a man, he spent his time with men like himself: and they would fight and box ; at last one gave him a blow that was the death of himn.

Questions.---What faults was Ned Jenks guilty of? [Ans. Fighting and calling names.] Are not quarrelsome boys very disagreeable? (Ans. Yes.] Do not they sometimes get a good baogiog ( Ans. Yes.] was not Ned Jeoks served right? [ins. Yes.] Did he not look very foolish with his two black

eyes when he thought to have had every thing his own way? [Ans. Yes.] Was it not very wicked in hìn to knock another boy's teeth out on purpose ? [Ans. Yes.]

Instruction ---Never give way to a quarrelsome disposition, for if you do so you will displease God, and become very disagreeable to every body. It should be your constant endea. your to live in peace with every body.

2

STORY VI. * Poor Hodge Gray got up at five o'clock, and when be bad put on his clothes he took the old horse Ball, and the old grey mare, and went to the field to plough it. At eight o'clock he went home and eat his bread and cheese, and drank bis pint of beer, and then to the field once more ; while Ball and the grey mare drew the plough, he guided it and sung a song. At noon he fed poor Ball and the mare, and gave them drink, and let then rest while he made a good meal at home; then be went to work once more, and he did his work well, for he would not cheat for all the world. Wher he had done work at sight he put by his plougb, and led poor Ball and the mare home, and gave them hay and corn, and then he took his own rest. He had not sucb a hard heart as to beat poor dumb beasts, and keep them from food and drink for a great while, as is the way with some folk.

Questions--Was not Hodge Gray a very good boy? (Ans. Yes.] Did he lie abed of a morning when he ought to have been up at his work? [Ans. No:] Did he grumble and fret because it was his lot to work hard ? (Ans. No.] How did he use the poor beasts that were under his care? [ Ans. Kindly.] Did he beat and bang them aboat as if they had no feeling? Ans. No.) Did be let them go without food? [Ans. No.} Did lie cheat his master hy playing in the bours he was paid for working ? [Ans. Na.] 1!

"seid on Instruction ---If ever you are employed to work for a

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w what to say

Instruction. It is n and that he is the Cre: all things. We mast:

re not to do or say

he was quite

was so

" Well, it is not too late for you to learn. It
" Yes

47

the worse for a nican dress."' ** I don't know
On Re"
at cborch if I go there,” said Tom. Cannot you

read
then?" said his friend : " Don't you know how to pray
" No:" said Ton. “That is a sad thing," said his friend.

you

and serve We must be afraid of

him; and what to do and say at church; and a great deal Father, lest we lose hi

That will do you gnod to know. Will you go, my boy;" elves. God is in all

lat wilt," said Tom if you will shew me the y, and knows the mos

way, and get me in." So the gentleman took'Tam to school, in be hidden from his

and there he learnt to read ; and when he was told how good

God is, he did so wish he had known it when he 1. We have great

he soon learnt to pray to God, and praise him for all things; have, nay our life is

and left off all his bad words and bad ways, and was one of sted us, where would

the best boys in the'whole school, 1. If God Jid not cci.

Questions.--- Was it not a sad thing for Tom Bowles to be from one minute to a:

brought up so as not to know the God who made him? aestions - Where is G.

Yes.] Did he never use the name of God ? [Ans. Yes.] t does God see? L

How did he ase it? TAns. In cursing and swearing.) Was us afraid of doing

not this dreadful? [Ans. Yes.) What place had he never (Ans. All we say.)

been in ? (Ans. A church.] Was not this dreadfid ? [Ans. ? [Ans. Bad words.

Yes:] What was it that he did not know how to do? Ans! Nothing.) What wil

Say his prayers.] was not this very shocking ? [Ans. Yes:) y bad words ? [Aris.

Was he not fortunate in meeting with a friend to pet him in en? (Ans. Yes. H

the way of doing what 'he ought? [Ans. Yes. What did

Tom wish when he was told of God's goodness? [ Ans. That as to fear him? [Anos

he had known it when be was younger.) How did be feel 1/l ? [Ans. Create

himself when he went to church? [ Ans. Glad.] What did - mankind? [ins. 1

be learn to do in a short time? (ons. To pray to God.] What did he soon leave off? [ Ams. Bad words and bad tricks.]

Instruction.---This story should teach you to reflect what a El you

misfortune it is to be brought up in ignorance of your daty,
and what a blessing it is to be put in the way of learning it
wbich will lead

you
to be thankful when yo

you meet with friends
to furnish you with instruction, and to make the best use of
ibe opportunities you have of learning bow to setxe and please
God.
2372

toujotain 1707 donds of og i ba? braguer is STORY,KI."god. 2234oans pas Jack Paine was one of those boys that lbve to teaze and vex the rest. If he was in the Workaroon at School, he would tell tales ; if he was upon the form in the room'wkete *

Fou! [ons. Yes.)
$.] Soculd you like

love
your

( ve become of all ni not provided for :

Could they have a old they have cre

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ite. (Ans. No.] S you? [Ans. Yo's. -0,1 As we car!

requires us to 11 pess to give us ir

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