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JOHN HEYWOOD'S

COMPLETE SERIES OF

HOME LESSON BOOKS

For use in Public Elementary Schools,

IN SIX BOOKS CORRESPONDING TO THE SIX STANDARDS OF

THE NEW CODE. (1875.)

BOOK VI. FOR STANDARD VI.,
Containing Lessons in Holy Scripture, Moral Poetry, Arithmetic,

Spelling, Grammar, and Geography,

BY

ALFONZO GARDINER,
HEAD MASTER OF THE OUTCOTE-BANK BOARD SCHOOL

(HUDDERSFIELD SCHOOL BOARD).

Author of “ Acoustics, Light, and Heat,” “Magnetism and
Electricity," "Electricity,” in Extra Subject Series, &c.,
“Annotated Poetry, for Standards IV-VI.” and
joint Author of “Plane and Solid Geometry,"

in “Science Manuals.”

MANCHESTER:
JOHN HEYWOOD, 141 AND 143, DEANSGATE.

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT, 141, DEANSGATE.
LONDON : SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & Co.; J. C. TACEY,

ARTICLE 28, NEW CODE (1875), STANDARD VI.

READING.--Reading with fluency and expression; and recitation of not less

than 50 lines of prose, or 100 lines of poetry.

N.B.-The passages for recitation may be taken from one or more standard authors, previously approved by the Inspector. Meanings and allusions to be known, and if well known to

atone for deficiencies of memory. WRITING.-A short "theme" or letter; the composition, spelling, grammar,

and handwriting to be considered. ARITHMETIC.-Proportion, vulgar and decimal fractions. GRAMMAR.-Parsing and Analysis of a short “complex" sentence. GEOGRAPHY.-(1) Standard IV-Outlines of Geography of Great Britain,

Ireland, and Colonies. (2) Standard V.-Outlines of Geography of Europe-physical

and political.

(3) Standard VI.--Outlines of Geography of the World. HISTORY.-(1) Standard IV.- Outlines of History of England to Norman

Conquest. (2) Standard V.-Outlines of History of England from Norman

onquest to Accession of Henry VII.
(3) Standard VI.-Outlines of History of England from Henry

VII., to Death of George III.
N.B.- In History and Geography the scholars in Standards

IV. VI. may, if desired, be taught and examined as one
class, taking the three specified divisions of these subjects
in successive years, and being expected to show greater
proficiency according to the Standards in which they are
presented. They should show special knowledge of any
historical events or characters connected with the district
in which their school is situated.

NEW EDITION.

ANSWERS TO THE ARITHMETICAL EXAMPLES

IN

JOHN HEYWOOD'S HOME LESSON BOOKS.

In Six Books, corresponding to the Standards, 2d. each.

PREFACE-STANDARD VI.

The present book, prepared for the Sixth Standard, completes the Series of Home Lessons. The same plan has been followed out in its compilation as has been adopted in the previous Standards.

The Arithmetic goes a little further than the Code specifies, including, as it does, Interest, Discount, Percentages, &c.; but, as many inspectors set questions on these cognate subjects in connection with Rule of Three, it is necessary for a lad to be acquainted with them. Inspectors' questions are indicated by an asterisk (*).

The Geography is prepared to meet the requirements of Article 28, New Code. Three lessons are given every Tuesday, marked A. for Standard IV., B. for Standard ., and C. for Standard VI. The same set of lessons is inserted in Standards IV. and V., so that full provision is made for the upper Standards taking “the three specified divisions of this subject in successive years ” (see Note, Art. 28), or each Standard may take its own set of lessons if required, which will, however, seldom be done except in very large schools.

The History reviews the period from A.D. 1485 to A.D. 1820. It was found impossible, without making the books for the upper Standards too bulky, to give three sets of lessons, as has been done in the case of Geography.

The Grammar Lessons of the previous Standard are continued under Elementary Analysis, together with numerous Parsing Exercises and Test Questions. As additional or alternative Exercises, Monday morning's poetry may be utilised.

Great care has been taken in accenting, and, when necessary, indicating the pronunciation of foreign and other names. This is not always the correct foreign pronunciation, but it is such as is tolerated by educated persons, or is sanctioned by usage. Nothing is more common than to find even ordinary foreign names fearfully murdered by pupil-teachers as well as scholars. Some good atlas, such as John Heywood's National Atlas (6d.), or the School Atlas (6d.), should be used by the pupils at home.

The pieces of Poetry selected for repetition consist of Thos. Moore's The T'ear of Repentance. Lalla Rookh" (135 lines) ; Milton's Il Penseroso," (175 lines); Macaulay's The Spanish Armada" (75 lines); Addison's “Psalm XXIII.(24 lines); and Scott's . Time" -Lady of the Lake(9 lines). One or more of these pieces can be prepared for the inspector at discretion. “Meanings and allusions” are explained for the children to learn, and to serve as hints and helps for the teacher.

HOME LESSONS-STANDARD VI.

FIRST WEEK. Lesson 1.-Monday Morning. Learn. PSALM II. ; OR ELSE LEARN

THE TEAR OF REPENTANCE-(Thomas Moore).

One morn a Pe-ril at the gate

Of Eden stood, disconsolate;
And as she listen'd to the springs

Of life within, 3 like music flowing,
(5) And caught the light upon her wings

Through the half-open portal4 glowing, 5
She wept to think her recreanto race

Should e'er have lost that glorious place ! he Pe'-ris, among the Persians, are delicate, fairy-like beings. descendants of fallen spirits, excluded from Paradise (Eden and Heaven) till they had done penance. They direct the way to Heaven to the pure in mind with a wand. 2. Sorrowful, hopeless, cast down. 3. This refers to the “pure river of water of life, clear as crystal” (Rev. xxii., 1). 4. A small door or gate. 5. Shining. 6. Going back from one's belief, sinful. The Peris were supposed to be descendants of the angels who had been expellel from Heaven for disubedience (Jude, v. 6).

Lesson 2.–Tuesday Morn. Geography. Write and Learn.

SCOTLAND. A 1.-BOUNDARIES AND EXTENT.-Scotland forms the northern part of the Island of Great Britain. It is bounded on the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, on the east by the North Sea, and on the south it is separated from England by the Solway Firth, the Cheviot Hills, and the R. Tweed..

Its greatest LENGTH, from Dunnet Head, in Caith'ress, to the Mull of Galloway, in Wig ton,* is about 280 miles.

Its BREADTH varies from 40 miles to above 150 miles.

Its AREA, including the islands, is 30,000 square miles, or rather more than half the size of England and Wales.

Its POPULATION is 3,400,000, or a little more than that of London.
Ed'-in-burgh (ed'-in-bor-o) is the capital.

EUROPE.
B 1-There are five continents : Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and
Australia.

EUROPE is the smallest of the great divisions of the globe, except Australia : but it is the continent most important to us, because it is the one we live in. Its length is 3,700 miles, and its breadth 2,400 miles. It is in the north-east of the OLD WORLD, and has the Arctic Ocean on the north, the Atlantic on the west, the Me-di-ter-ra'-ne-an Sea, the Black Sea, and Mount Cau'-cas-us on the south; and the Ural Mountains and River Ural and Cag'-pi-an Sea separate it from ASIA on the east.

Europe contains a great number of gulfs and inland seas. It has the greatest length of coast line, according to its size, of any of the continents. This great length of coast influences the climate, and affords great facilities for commerce.

* This name is often written TVigtown.

THE ZONES. C 1-The whole of the earth's surface, both land and sea, is divided into five regions called Zones.

The word zone means a belt, and each zone goes round the earth from

east to west like a kind of belt. These zones consist of two cold regions, two temperate regions, and one hot region.

The cold regions are called the North Frig-id Zone and the South Frig'-id Zone. The North Frigid Zone includes all the land and sea for about 1,600 miles round the North Pole Frigid means cold.

The sea is all covered with ice and the land with snow. There are no

trees growing, and only a few little shrubs. The bear on the land and the walrus and whale in the sea, are the chief animals, and

very few people live in this region. The South Frigid Zone surrounds the South Pole, and is similar to the North Frigid Zone. Lesson 3.-Wednesday Morning. Work these Sums.

COMPOUND PROPORTION. (1) If the wages of 6 men for 3 weeks be £27, what will be the wages of 4 men for 5 weeks?

(2) If 13 men earn £30 in 14 days, how much will 10 men earn in 10 days at the same rate ?

(3) What is the interest on £125 for 76 days @ 3 per cent per annum ?

(4) Eight men do a piece of work in six days : in what time will twelve men do twice as much ? Lesson 4.- Thursday Morn. Grammar. Write and Learn. Ex. l. Analyse und Parse

At first it seemed a little speck,

And then it seemed a mist;
It moved and moved and took at last

A certain shape I wist.-(S. T. Coleridge.) * Ex. 2. What is a prepositional phrase, and to what part of speech is it equal ? Give six examples.

Ex. 3. COMPOSITION. -Write a letter on anything you like. Lesson 5.-Friday Morning. Work these Sums.

(1) If 4 horses eat 3 bushels of oats in 9 days, how many bushels will 17 horses eat in 10 days?

(2) If the carriage of 1 ton for 8 miles be £3 16s., what will be the charge for 4 tons lcwt. for 12 miles ?

(3) Seven men can build a wall in 20 days, working 8 hours daily ; how long will 4 men be building it, working 10 hours daily?

(4) If the wages of 6 men for 6 days be £9, what will be the wages of 15 men for 21 days? History.-Write and Learn.—THE HOUSE OF TUDOR.

Began to reign. Died.

Son of Edmund, eldest son of Oren

Tudor and Catherine, widow of HENRY VII. ....... 1485 1509 Henry V. ; his mother, Margaret

Beaufort, was great-granddaugh

ter of John of Gaunt HENRY VIII..

1509 1547 Son of Henry VII. EDWARD VI

1547 1653 Son of Henry VIII, by Jane Seymour MARY

| Daughter of Henry VIII. by Cathe

1553 ELIZABETH

1559

Daughter of lienry VIII, by Anne 1603

Boleyn.

1558{ Drine of Arragon

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