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POPULATION OF THE PRINCIPAL CITIES OF OHIO: 1810 TO 1900.

1840

1830

1820

1810

1,665

9,642

606

2,540

3,266

2,603
115, 435
17,034 1
17,882
10,977
5,108
3,829

46,338 6,071 6,048 6,067 2,062 1,222

24,831 1,076 2,435 2,950 1,080

1,000 1,868

Population of the Principal Cities of Ohio, 1810-1900.

INCREASE IN POPULATION OF THE PRINCIPAL CITIES OF OHIO: 1810 TO 1900.

Increase
from 1830 to

1840.

Increase
from 1820 to

1830.

Increase
from 1810 to

1829.

Per
cent.

Number.

Per cent.

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Cities.

1900

1890

1880

1870

1860

1850

Akron city
Canton city
Cincinnati city
Cleveland city
Columbus city
Dayton city
Springtield city
Toledo city
Youngstown city

42,728
30,667
325,902
381,768
125,560
85,333
38,253
131,822
44,885

27.601
26,189
296,908
261,353
88,150
61,220
31,895
81,434
33,220

16,512
12,258
255,139
160,146
51,647
38,678
20,730
50,137
15,435

10,006

8,660
216,239
92,829
31,274
30, 473
12,652
31,384
8,075

3,477

4,041
161,044
43,417
18,554
20,081

7,002
13,768
2,759

Increase
from 1890 to

1900.

Increase
from 1880 to

1890.

Increase
from 1870 to

1880.

Increase
from 1850 0

1870.

Increase from 1851 to

1850.

Increase
from 18 10 to

1850.

CITIES.

Num-
ber.

Per
cent.

Num-
ber.

Per
cent.

Num-
ber.

Per
cent.

Num-
ber.

Per
cent.

Num-
ber.

Per
cent.

Num-
ber.

Per
cent.

Num-
ber.

157.5
77.6

Akron city
Canton city
Cincinnati city
Cleveland city
Columbus city
Dayton city
Springfield city
Toledo city
Youngstown city

15,127

54.8 11,089
4,478 17.1 13,931
28,994 9.8 41,769
120, 415 46.1 101,207
37,410 42.4 36,303
24,113 39.4 22,542
6,358 19.9

11,165
50,388 61.9 31,297
11,665 | 35.1 | 17,786

67.2 6,506 65.0 6,529
113.6 3,398 41.5 4,619
16.4 | 38,900 18.0 | 55,195
63.2 67,317 72.5 | 49,412
70.7 | 20,373 65.1 | 12,720
58.3 8, 205 26.9 | 10,392
53.9
8,078
63.8

5,650
62.4 | 18,553 58.7 | 17,816
115.2 7,360 | 91.1 5,316

187.8
114.3

34.3
113.8
68.6
51.8
80.7
129.4
192.7

211
1,438
46,609
26,383

672
9,1041
1,894
9,939

6.5 1,601 96.2
56.2
39.5 69,097 149.1 21,507 86.6 17,189
154.9 | 10,963 | 180.6 1 4,995 | 464.21 470

3.8 | 11,834 195.7 | 3,613 | 148.4 1.
82.9 4,910 80.9 | 3,117 105.7 | 1,950
37.1 | 3,046 147.7 1 982

90.91

1788
259.6 2,607 213.3

195.0
142.2

Decrease.

Population of the Principal Cities of Ohio, 1810-1900.

All of the above named cities received marked accessions to their pri ulation during the last ten years, preceding the census of 1900, those ba' ing increased by the largest percentage being Toledo, 61.9 percent; Akr'. 54.8 percent; Cleveland, 46.1 percent; and Columbus, 42.4 percent. Larg st numerical gains during the decade are found in Cleveland, Toledo ad Columbus. With a single exception in one decade each of these cities has increased in population steadily, but the rate of growth has been irregular and has shown no uniform trend of change. For Cincinnati, Cleveland and Springfield, however, that rate since 1870 has steadily declined, a change in harmony with the usual tendency of large urban centers.

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PART SEVEN.

THE STATE INSTITUTIONS, HOMES AND

HOSPITALS OF OHIO.

TABLE OF CONTENTS PART SEVEN.

The Ohio Capitol Buildings
The Ohio State Board of Agriculture
Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station at Wooster.
The Athens State Hospital
The Cleveland State Hospital
The Columbus State Hospital
The Dayton State Hospital
The Longview State Hospital
The Massillon State Hospital .
The Toledo State Hospital
The Institution for the Education of the Blind.
The Institution for Deaf Mutes....
Institution for Feeble-Minded Youth
The Hospital for Epileptics
The Boys' Industrial School
The Girls' ludustrial Home
The Ohio Penitentiary .
The Ohio Reformatory (Mansfield)
Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home (Sandusky)
The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home
Ohio State University .
The Ohio University (Athens)
Miami University .
The Wilberforce University

PAGE 823 825 827 831 836 841 844 850 864 865 868 871 874 878 881 883 887 893 895 900 904 907 912 915

THE OHIO CAPITOL BUILDINGS.

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HE Capitol Buildings of the State of Ohio stand in the principal square in the city of Columbus, in a park containing over ten

acres of well cultivated lawns and native forestry, on land which was given to the state by the proprietors of the town site, in 1812. The name “Columbus” was selected for the town and bestowed upon it by the General Assembly at a later date.

The illustrations on the frontispiece give some idea of the style of building but fall far short, in dignity and point of finish, of doing justice to either the old Capitol Building or the new Department of Justice.

The original “State House,” erected by the grantors of the public grounds on condition that Columbus—then unsettled—should be chosen for the Capital of Ohio,-was a series or row of brick buildings on High street, beginning at State street and running north along the present property to a point about halfway to the present west entrance to the “State House yard." These structures were burned Sunday morning, February 1, 1852. The old Capitol Building, as it is now called, was begun in April, 1839, and was partially completed and dedicated in January, 1857. The corner stone was laid July 4, 1839. The building was finished in 1861 and was a useful rendezvous for troops gathering for service in the Union Army during the Civil War. The Department of Justice Building was built under an act of the 73rd General Assembly, adjoining the old Capitol at the terrace on the east. It thus occupies the Third street front of the Capitol grounds and, being of similar architecture to its predecessor, adds to, rather than detracts from the simple beauty of the structure.

As an illustration of the advance in structural science a comparison of the two methods of building is interesting. The original structure was begun in 1838, and finished in 1861. Deducting for time consumed in numberless interruptions, the time actually spent in the building of it, was fifteen years; the cost $1,360,000; the labor was that of idle convjets from the Penitentiary; the material, dressed limestone from state quarries west of the city. The new building was authorized in 1898; corner stone was laid February 16, 1899, and on the 1st of September, 1901, the several departments assigned to this building are taking possession of their beautiful quarters. The exterior of the new building is of dressed limestone; the trusses are of steel. The actual time of building was three years, the cost $450,000, and the foot-space of public offices equal to about one-half that of the main building. The old building is 304 feet

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