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HISTORY

OF THE

WELSH SUNDAY CLOSING ACT.

BY

E. BEAVAN.

(CARDIFF.)

Cardiff :
DANIEL OWEN AND COMPANY, LIMITED, ST. MARY STREET.

1885.

1687

е e

23

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PREFACE.

This sketch of the rise and progress of the movement which resulted in the passing of the Act whereby the sale of Intoxicating Liquors was prevented on the Lord's Day in the Principality, together with the necessity, operations, and success of the Act down to the present time, have appeared in a series of weekly articles in the Western Mail. In the hope that it will prove useful and interesting to those who not only have the Temperance cause at heart, but the desire to abolish “Sunday trading” in every respect, especially the sale of alcoholic drinks. It has been revised and is now sent forth in a new form, with the earnest wish of the Author that it may do something to advance the great movement which is grappling with the dread monster Drink, and aid in hastening the downfall of a traffic and system which is doing so mu mischief in our midst daily, spreading and perpetuating gigantic evils on every hand, causing the cry to go up from the whole land for speedy deliverance from this dreadful plague and scourge.

E.B. 29, Wordsworth Street, Cardiff,

April, 1885.

A 2

THE WELSH SUNDAY CLOSING ACT.

I.-INTRODUCTORY,

WALES AND

WELSHMEN.

N considering the history of the movement for

the Sunday closing of public-houses in Wales it will be useful and necessary to sum up briefly the social condition of the Welsh people and the circumstances by which they are surrounded, which, in my opinion, did much toward the success of the movement. I propose to deal with these points and then proceed with the Sunday Closing Bill, or, as it will be more correct to write it now, Act. It will be quite unnecessary to enlarge at any great length upon the condition of the Welsh people--the facts will be admitted on all sides, I have little doubt—but it will be desirable to refer to the leading features, and to show their bearing upon the subject before us.

Many able pens have praised the beauties of Welsh scenery, and there is still work for a competent writer who could trace and describe the development of Welsh trade, commerce, industries, religion, education, literature, institutions, politics, the manners and customs of the people, and the extent to which these manners and customs have been influenced by the progress of this development. Wales can boast of many men to-day, dwelling in her beautiful valleys, climbing her rugged mountains, and travelling the chief

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