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ways welcome. He sat a long while over his hilarate him — nover made him unfit for wine, chatting gaily to some friend or other, work or for society. for he never dined alone; or to one of the 66 Over his wine, then, he sat some hours; actors, whom he often had with him, after no such thing as dessert was seen upon his dinner, to read over their parts, and to take table in those days not even the customary his instructions. He was fond of wine, and coffee after dinner. His mode of living was drank daily his two or three bottles. extremely simple ; and even when persons of

“Lest this statement should convey a false very moderatê circumstances burned wax, impression, I hasten to recall to the reader's two poor tallow'candles were all that could recollection the

very

different habits of our be seen in his rooms. In the evening he fathers in respect of drinking. It was no went often to the theatre, and there his cus-, unusual thing to be a three-bottle man' in tomary glass of punch was brought at six those days in England, when the three bot- o'clock. If not at the theatre, he received tles were of port or burgundy; and Goethe, friends at home. Between eight and nine a a Rhinelander, accustomed from boyhood to frugal supper was laid ; but he never took wine, drank a wine which his English con- anything except a little salad or preserves: temporaries would have called water. The By ten o'clock he was usually in bed.” amount he drank never did more than ex

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MEMOIR OF THE KING OF SWEDEN.-Oscar I., sequence of the continued illness of his father, King of Sweden and Norway, born July 4, 1799, Regent of the kingdom. In 1844 he ascended is the only issue of the marriage of Marshal Ber- the throne, and became heir to a personal fornadotte with Desirée Clary, daughter of a mer- tune of 80,000,000 francs, saved by the King chant of Marseilles, whose elder sister mar- from a civil list of but 3,000,000 francs per anried Joseph Bonaparte. Oscar Bernadotte was num. His Government has been marked by libplaced, at the age of nine years, in the Imperial erality and justice. He has four sons and two Lyceum, where his name may yet be seen on the daughters, one of whom the old King of Denwalls of the various quartiers of that establish- mark wished to make his third wife, but rement

. Marshal Bernadotte was elected Crown ceived a positive refusal. Prince of Sweden, accepted the reversion of the crown, and borrowing 2,000,000 francs, that he

TIMES PROHIBITING MARRIAGE.

-I have a might not appear in Stockholm with only his gword, proceeded at once to that capital with his note to the effect that the following is entered in BOD, after both had abjured Catholicism on the the register of the church of St. Mary, Beverly, road

, and embraced Lutheranism, the dominant with the date “ November 25, 1641," but I have religion of Sweden. Bernadotte bad shortly the no reference to the authority satisfaction of seeing his son soon forget his - When Advent comes do thou refraine, French in the course of a year, and acquire, Till Hillary set ye free againe. under the teaching of the poet Atterborn, per Next Septuagessima saith the nay, fect mastery over the Swediŝh language.

But when Lowe Sunday comes thou may. In 1818, when, after the death of Charles XIII., Yet at Rogation thou must tarrie, Bernadotte ascended the throne, he transmitted Till Trinitie shall bid the marry.' to Oscar the title of Chancellor of the University

STOKE NEWINGTON.

Notes and Queries. of Upsal, of which next year he became a student. His military instruction kept .pace with his literary instruction, and in 1818 he became Colonel of the Guards. He had scarcely quit

SIMILE OF A WOMAN TO THE MOON. ted the Swedish soil during his reign. Once, sion I have seen (and I believe in print) of the however

, under pretence of going to visit the Latin epigram on this subject runs thus ? banks of the Rhine he pushed as far as Eichstadt,

“Luna est. Foemina. in Bavaria, the residence of Eugene Beauhárnias, Duke of Leuchtenberg, whose eldest daughter Luna; rubet; pallet, crescit, noctu, ambulat," Josephine he married, July 19th of that year.

errat, This marriage was much talked of in Europe,

Hæc quoque foemineo propria sunt generi ; a seeming to prove that the plebeian origin of

Cornua Luna facit; facit hæc quoque Fæmina : the new Swedish dynasty had not been forgotten

Luna by the courts of the continent. In 1834 he was

Mense semel mutat; Fæmina quâque die." damed Viceroy of Norway, and in 1838, in con. Notes and Queries.

D. S.

The ver

impossible ; verse could create fame, but notive to Court etiquette.' To say, as Niebuhr money: fama and fames were then, as ever, says, that the Court was a Dalilah to which in terrible contiguity. As soon as the neces- he sacrificed his locks,' is profoundly to sity for a career is admitted, much objection misunderstand his genius, profoundly to falis to the ground; for those who reproach misread his life. Had his genius been of him with having, wasted his time on court that stormy class which produces great refestivities, and the duties of government, formers and great martyrs — had it been his which others could have done as well, must mission to agitate mankind by words which, ask whether he would have saved that time reverberating to their inmost recesses, called had he followed the career of jurisprudence them to lay down their lives in the service and jostled the lawyers through the courts at of an idea — had it been his tendency to Frankfort? or would they prefer secing meditate upon the far-off destinies of inan, him reduced to the condition of poor Schiller, and sway men by the coercion of grand repwasting so much of his precious life in liter- resentative abstractions, – then, indeed, we ary •hack-work, translating French books might say his place was aloof from the motfor a miserable pittance? Time, in any ley throng, and not in sailing down the case, would have been claimed; in return swiftly-flowing stream to sounds of mirth and for that given to Karl August, he received, music on the banks. But he was not a reas he confesses in the poem addressed to the former, not a martyr. He was a poet, whose Duke, “what the great seldom bestow - rel on was Beauty, whose worship was of affection, leisure, confidence, garden and Nature, whose aim was culture. His mishouse. No one bave I had to thank but him; sion was to paint life; and for that it was and much have I wanted, who, as a poet, ill- requisite he should see life, to know understood the arts of gain. If Europe praised me, what has Europe done for me?

« « The haunt and the main region of his song.' Nothing. Even my works have been an er- Happier circumstances might indeed have pense to me.'

surrounded him and given him a greater “In 1801, writing to his mother on the sphere. It would have been very different, complaints uttered against him by. those as he often felt, if there had been a nation to who judged so falsely of his condition, he appeal to, instead of a heterogeneous mass says they only saw what he gave up, not of small peoples, willing enough to talk of what he gained -- they could not comprehend Fatherland, but in nowise prepared to behow he grew daily richer, though he daily come a nation. There are many other ifs in gave up so much. He confesses that the which much virtue could be found ; but innarrow circle of a burgher life would have asmach as he could not create circumstances, ill accorded with his ardent and wide-sweep we must follow his example, and be content ing spirit. Had he remained at Frankfort, with what the gods provided. I do not, I he would have been ignorant of the world. confess, see what other sphere was open to But here the panorama of life was uprolled him in which his genius could have been before him, and his experience was every way more sacred; but I do see that he built enlarged. Did not Leonardo da Vinci spend out of circumstanco a noble temple, in which much of his time charming the Court of Mi- the altar-fame burnt with a steady light. lan with his poetry and lute-playing? did he To hypothetical biographers he left the task not also spend time in mechanical and hydro- of settling what Goethe might have been; statical labors for the state? No reproach enough for us to catch some glimpse of what is lifted against his august name; no one he was.” cries out against his being false to his genius; no one rebukes him for having painted so little As a specimen of the narrative portion of at one period. The Last Supper 'speaks for the book we subjoin the account of Goethe's him. Will not Tasso, Iphigenia, Hermann daily life at Weimar, about the beginning of and Dorothea, Faust, Meister, and the long this century, when he was fifty years old. list of Goethe's works, speak for him?

“I have dwelt mainly on the dissipation of “ He rose at seven, sometimes earlier, afhis time, because the notion that a court life ter a sound and prolonged sleep: for, like affected his genius by. corrupting his mind' Thorwaldsen, he had a talent for sleeping' is preposterous. No reader of this biogra- only surpassed by his talent for continuous phy, it is to be hoped, will fail to see the work. Till eleven he worked without intertrue relations in which he stood to the ruption. A cup of chocolate was then Duke ; how free they were from anything brought, and he resumed work till one. At like servility or suppression of genuine im- two he dined. This meal was the important pulse. Indeed, one of the complaints against meal of the day. His appetite was immense. him, according to the unexceptionable au- Even on the days when he complained of not thority of Riemer, was that made by the sub- being hungry, he ate much more than most alterns, of his not being sufficiently atten- men. Puddings, sweets, and cakes were al

ways welcome. He sat a long while over his hilarate him - nover made him unfit for wine, chatting gaily to some friend or other, work or for society. for he never dined alone ; or to one of the “ Over his wine, then, he sat some hours; actors, whom he often had with him, after no such thing as dessert was seen upon his dinner, to read over their parts, and to take table in those days — not even the customary his instructions. He was fond of wine, and coffee after dinner. His mode of living was drank daily his two or three bottles. extremely simple ; and even when persons of

“ Lest this statement should convey a false very moderate circumstances burned wax, impression, I hasten to recall to the reader's two poor tallow candles were all that could recollection the very different habits of our be seen in his rooms. In the evening he fathers in respect of drinking. It was no went often to the theatre, and there his cusunusual thing to be a three-bottle man' in tomary glass of punch was brought at six those days in England, when the three bot- o'clock. If not at the theatre, he received tles were of port or burgundy; and Goethe, friends at home. Between eight and nine a a Rhinelander, accustomed from boyhood to frugal supper was laid ; but he never took wine, drank a wine which his English con- anything except a little salad or preserves. temporaries would have called water. The By ten o'clock he was usually in bed.”' amount he drank never did more than ex

MEMOIR OF THE KING OF SWEDEN. - Oscar I., sequence of the continued illness of his father, King of Sweden and Norway, born July 4, 1799, Regent of the kingdom. In 1844 he ascended is the only issue of the marriage of Marshal Ber- the throne, and became heir to a personal forRadotte with Desirée Clary, daughter of a mer- tune of 80,000,000 francs, saved by the King chant of Marseilles, whose elder sister mar- from a civil list of but 3,000,000 francs per anried Joseph Bonaparte. Oscar Bernadotte was num. His Government has been marked by libplaced, at the age of nine years, in the Imperial erality and justice. He has four sons and two Lyceum, where his name may yet be seen on the daughters, one of whom the old King of Denwalls of the various quartiers of that establish- mark wished to make his third wife, but rement. Marshal Bernadotte was elected Crown ceived a positive refusal.' Prince of Sweden, accepted the reversion of the crown, and borrowing 2,000,000 francs, that he might not appear in Stockholm with only his

TIMES PROHIBITING MARRIAGE. - I have a sword, proceeded at once to that capital with his note to the effect that the following is entered in son, after both had abjured Catholicism on the the register of the church of St. Mary, Beverly, road, and embraced Lutheranism, the dominant with the date “ November 25, 1641,' but I have religion of Sweden. Bernadotte bad shortly the no reference to the authority. satisfaction of seeing his son soon forget his " When Advent comes do thou refraine, French in the course of a year, and acquire, Till Hillary set ye free againe. under the teaching of the poet Atterborn, per Next Septuagessima saith the nay, fect mastery over the Swedish language.

But when Lowe Sunday comes thou may. In 1818, when, after the death of Charles XIII.,

Yet at Rogation thou must tarrie, Bernadotte ascended the throne, he transmitted Till Trinitie shall bid the marry." to Oscar the title of Chancellor of the University

STOKE NEWINGTON. - Notes and Queries. of Upsal, of which next year he became a student. His military instruction kept pace with his literary instruction, and in 1818 he became Colonel of the Guards. He had scarcely quit SIMILE OF A WOMAN TO THE MOON. —The verted the Swedish soil during his reign. Once, sion I have seen (and I believe in print) of the however, under pretence of going to visit the Latin epigram on this subject runs thus : banks of the Rhine he pushed as far as Eichstadt,

Luna est Fæmina. in Bavaria, the residence of Eugene Beauhárnias, Duke of Leuchtenberg, whose eldest daughter

“ Luna, Tubet, pallet, crescit, noctu, ambulat, Josephine he married, July 19th of that year. errat,

This marriage was much talked of in Europe, Hæc quoque foemineo propria sunt generi ; as seerning to prove that the plebeian origin of

Cornua Luna facit; facit hæc quoque Fæmina :

Luna the new Swedish dynasty had not been forgotten by the courts of the continent. In 1834 he was Mense semel mutat; Fomina quâque die." named Viceroy of Norway, and in 1838, in con Notes and Queries.

D. S.

THE POEM OF

BABIE BELL.

In little Babie Bell!
A LITTLE LIFE THAT WAS BUT Her little form more perfect grew,
THREE APRILS LONG.

And in her features wo could trace,

In softened curves, her mother's face : BY T. B. ALDRIO.

Her angel naturo ripened too. Have you not heard the poet tell

We thought her lovely whon she came, How came the dainty Babie Bell

But she was holy, saintly now; Into this world of ours?

Around her palo and lofty brow The gates of heaven were left ajar :

We saw a ring of slender flame ! With folded hands and dreamy eyes

She wandered out of Paradise ! She saw this planet, like a star,

It came upon us by degrees; Hung in the depths of purple even

We saw its shadow ere it fell, Its bridges, running to and fro,

The knowledge that our God had sent O’er which the white-winged seraphs go, His messenger for Babie Bell! Bearing the holy dead to heaven!

We shuddered with unlanguaged pain, She touched a bridge of flowers those feet, And all our thoughts ran into tears ! So light they did not bend the bells

And all our hopes were changed to fears Of the celestial asphodels !

The sunshine into dismal rain ! They fell like dew upon the flowers,

Aloud we cried in our belief : And all the air grew strangely sweets

“O, smite us gently, gently, God ! And thus came dainty Babie Bell

Teach us to bend and kiss the rod, Into this world of ours !

And perfect grow through grief !”

Ah, how we loved her, God can tell; She came, and brought delicious May!

Her little heart was cased in ours —
The swallows built beneath the eaves,

They're broken caskets - Babie Bell !
Like sunbeams in and out the leaves,
The robins went, the livelong day :

At last he came, the messenger,
The lily swung its noiseless bell,

The messenger from unseen lands : And o'er the porch the trembling vine And what did dainty Babie Bell ? Seemed bursting with its veins of wine.

She only crossed her little hands, 0, earth was full of pleasant smell,

She only looked more meek and fair. When came the dainty Babie Bell

We parted back her silken hair; Into this world of ours !

We laid some buds upon her brow

Death's bride arrayed in flowers !
O Babie, dainty Babie Bell!
How fair she grew from day to days

And thus went dainty Babie Bell

Out of this world of ours.
What woman nature filled her eyes,
What poetry within them lay !

- Journal of Commerce. Those deep and tender twilight eyes,

So full of meaning, pure and bright
As if she yet stood in the light

SONNET.
Of those oped gates of Paradise !

BY MARIE J. EWEN.
And we loved Babie more and more :
O never in our hearts before
Such holy love was born;

Credi; & tremendo, perche l'uomo è vile ;
We felt we had a link between

Ed un codardo fu colui che primo

Un Dio ne feci.-V. Monti.
This real world and that unseen -
The land of deathless morn.

WITH high-souled Monti, cowardly I deem
And for the love of those dear eyes,

Him who first made a god of destiny; For love of her whom God led forth, For our “ life-statue," I believe, may be

The mother's being ceased on earth Shaped from the shadows of Youth's earnest When Babie came from Paradise !

dream, Por love of him who smote our lives,

So rainbow-wreathed with many a fairy gleamAnd woke the chords of joy and pain,

Until it rise bright as that fantasy,
We said, “Sweet Christ!” our hearts bent down A thing of light, all beautiful and free,
Like violets after rain !

In front of earth and heaven. Thus it should

seem And now the orchards which were once That he who steadfast stands through good and

All white and rosy in their bloom Filling the crystal heart of air

Who yokes blind Fortune's coursers to his car, With gentle pulses of perfume

Who through strange failures works untiring Were thick with yellow, juicy fruit;

still, The plums were globes of honey rare,

Until all adverse powers are driven far, And soft-cheeked peaches blushed and fell; Shall conquer Fate through the resistless will, The grapes were purpling in the grange; And rise crowned victor o'er his evil star. And time wrought just as rich a change

- Chambers' Journal.

Il fato,

ill,

of vivid gas.

From the Dublin University Magazine.

dark region without horror and dismay. Now HOW I BECAME AN EGYPTIAN. the one feeling was, escape. I looked for(The following fragments were left at home ward into the blackness, as into the face by an eccentric young man, who had given some of a friend. A wide wooden rail was about promise in the literary way, but volunteered the this time passed on my left, with oars leaving other day, to the grief of his friends, and sailed against it. Farther down, I brushed by a for the East. We give them to our readers as ring and ropo. What was still lower, I could they have come into our hands, leaving them to decide whither he has assigned adequate exciting not see ; and for an instant hesitated about causes for the strange suspicions which seem to trusting my foot down into the darkness, when have taken hold of his imagination. Men know one of the oars I had just left above me I heard but little of the psychology of this portion of our fall—it had been touched, I felt, by the organization : anything, therefore, which tends to illustrate it, is interesting. – ED.)

Pursuer. My mind was made up. I trod boldly forward, and found footing to make a

spring on to the gunwale of a barge. I reached I FLED through the streets, crowded as they it; and passed with three strides across it to were, forcing my way, with the determination another, moored alongside, and then to a third, of terror; for I felt that I must make my in crossing which I could discern the reflecescape, whatever came of it. The avenues tions of the dim lights of the opposite side of of the city actually roared with life and blazed the river, struggling, as it were, to hold their with light, from a thousand voices and foot- places against the rush of the black stream steps, a thousand wheels, and a thousand jets towards the left. My terror must have been

Yet through all did I speed — extreme, enhanced by the bounding up of the speed along - I know not how, I scarcely planks behind me under the pursuing step, for I know why, whither, or from what ; but with never slackened my pace, nor felt an instant's some vague idea of reaching the river, as if hesitation, but, fevered as I was by the hot its banks were the horns of the altar of Hope. speed of my course, sprung, as far as my

wildest strength could carry me, out into the It was down an alley I was now pressing, mid-stream. narrow at first, and partially obscure, but, as it opened upon a solitary gaslight, widening Panting, wet, giddy, exhausted, reeking into a silent street, of which the termination with slime, which booted my legs up to the seemed swallowed up in darkness. As we knees, I leaned against a damp wall to recorrushed — why do I say we? As I rushed out er breath and consciousness after my transit. of the din of the raging city into this deserted Involuntarily straining my eyes back into the arenue, and bounded along it, I began totide I had just crossed, I experienced a feeling hear, what I had only been intuitively con- of relief, as I saw that there was nothing scious of before, the footsteps of one running swimming across. So I have baffled the Purbehind me. It may be supposed that the suer, I said to myself — put the river between sound added wings to my flight, which was it and me! Well done! The swim was a further urged by the knowledge that I was tough one, and the flounder out tougher still. fast approaching the banks of the river. In I have been all but sucked down -- an ugly fact, the sullen rush of its black waters began death. But here I am – alone. The shadow to make itself audible, traversing at right of a smile stole across my features as I plashed angles the double row of grim houses, which slowly up the slope, and sought for some ranked at either side off into shadow, and road or avenue that might conduct me within terminating the perspective before me. Here the lights, and towards the habitations of the ground, or street-way, too, began to de- men. Nor was I long unsuccessful. The scend, as the bank of the river was approached; wall, which I had to feel along, turned aband by some fainter lights, sparingly scat- ruptly to the right after a few yards, and I tered, there came into view the shapeless judged, from the difference of the footing, thr hulls of barges, moored in masses along the I was now on a beaten path, which m shelving slime of the water's edge. have its exit somewhere in a thorough'

I suppose at any other period of my life I Exhausted as I was shocked, dre could not have contemplated casting myself bemired — I could not help feeling ri into the gloomy and foul uncertainties of this the feat I had accomplished ; and a DCVII.

7

LIVING AGE.

VOL. XII.

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