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TO

A LADY,

WITH A PRESENT OF A KNIFE.

A Knife, dear Girl, cuts love they say Mere modish love, perhaps it may ; For any tool of any kind, Can sep'rate what was never join'd. The Knife that cuts our love in two, Will have much tougher work to do: Must cut your softness, worth and spirit Down to the vulgar size of merit ; To level your's with modern taste, Must cut a world of sense to waste; And from your single beauty's store, Clip what would dizen out a score. The self-same blade from me must sever Sensation, judgment, sight, for ever ; All mem'ry of endearments past, All hope of comforts long to last, All that makes fourteen years with you, A Summer,--and a short one too :)

All that affection feels, and fears,
When hours, without you, seem like years.
Till that he done (and I'd as soon
Believe this Knife will chip the moon)
Accept my present undeterr'd,
And leave their Proverbs to the herd.
If in a kiss-delicious treat!
Your lips acknowledge the receipt!
Love, fond of such substantial fare,
And proud to play the glutton there,
All thoughts of cutting will disdain,
Save onlycut and come again.'

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FROM

A GENTLEMAN,

ON THE LATE

ANNIVERSARY OF HIS WEDDING-DAY,

TO HIS WIFE,

WITH A RING AND THE FOLLOWING LINES.

By the Same.

Thee, MARY, with this ring I wed," So sixteen years ago I said Behold another ring !-"For what?" “ To wed thee o'er again,—why not?"

With the first ring I married Youth, Grace, Beauty, Innocence, and Truth; Taste long admir’d, Sense long rever'd: And all my MOLLY then appear'd.

If she, by merit since disclos'd,
Prov'd twice the woman I suppos'd,
I plead that double merit now,
To justify a double vow.

Here then, to-day, (with faith as sure,
With ardor as intense and pure,
As when amidst the rites divine
I took thy troth, and plighted mine)
To thee, sweet girl, my second ring,
A token and a pledge I bring;
With this I wed, till Death us part,
Thy riper virtues to my heart;
These virtues, which, before untry'd,
The wife has added to the bride;
Those virtues, whose progressive claim,
Endearing Wedlock's very name,
My soul enjoys, my song approves,
For Conscience sake, as well as Love's.

For why?-They shew me hour by hour Honor's high thought, Affection's pow'r, Discretion's deed, sound Judgment's sentence: And teach me all things—but Repentance !

TO

A YOUNG LADY,

ON

SEEING HER DANCE.

BY PETER PINNEL, M. A.

O! MAY you walk, as years advance, Smooth and erect, as now you dance; May you on each important stage, From bloom of youth to wither'd age, Assert your claim to Merit's prize; And, as at present, charm our eyes ; Observant of Decorum's laws, And moving with the same applause, May you, thro' life's perplexing maze, Direct your steps with equal praise ; Its intricate meanders trace With regularity and grace ; From the true figure never swerve, And time in every step observe ; Give ear to harmony and reason, Nor make one motion out of season!

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