The Origin and Evolution of Planetary Nebulae

Передняя обложка
Cambridge University Press, 25 мая 2000 г. - Всего страниц: 243
This authoritative volume presents a thoroughly modern understanding of planetary nebulae, integrating new developments in stellar physics with the dynamics of nebular evolution. It covers all the stages in the evolution of planetary nebulae, carefully synthesizes observations from across the spectrum and clearly explains all the key physical processes at work. Particular emphasis is placed on recent observations from space, using the Hubble Space Telescope, the Infrared Space Observatory and the ROSAT satellite. Coverage also describes exciting possibilities such as the use of planetary nebulae in determining the cosmic distance scale, the distribution of dark matter and the chemical evolution of galaxies. This book provides graduate students with an accessible introduction to planetary nebulae, and researchers with an authoritative reference. It can also be used as an advanced textbook on the physics of the interstellar medium.

Отзывы - Написать отзыв

Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва.

Другие издания - Просмотреть все

Об авторе (2000)

Sun Kwok is a leading world authority on the subject of astrochemistry and stellar evolution. He is best known for his theory on the origin of planetary nebulae and the death of Sun-like stars. His recent research has been on the topic of the synthesis of complex organic compounds in the late stages of stellar evolution. He is the author of many books, including Cosmic Butterflies (2001), Physics and Chemistry of the Interstellar Medium (2007) and Organic Matter in the Universe (2012). He has been a guest observer on many space missions, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Infrared Space Observatory. He currently serves as President of Commission 34 Interstellar Matter of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), as well as Vice President of IAU Commission 51 Bioastronomy. He served as chairman of the IAU Planetary Nebulae Working Group between 1994 and 2001, and as organizing committee member of the IAU Astrochemistry Working Group.

Sun Kwok is a leading world authority on the subject of astrochemistry and stellar evolution. He is best known for his theory on the origin of planetary nebulae and the death of Sun-like stars. His recent research has been on the topic of the synthesis of complex organic compounds in the late stages of stellar evolution. He is the author of many books, including Cosmic Butterflies (2001), Physics and Chemistry of the Interstellar Medium (2007) and Organic Matter in the Universe (2012). He has been a guest observer on many space missions, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Infrared Space Observatory. He currently serves as President of Commission 34 Interstellar Matter of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), as well as Vice President of IAU Commission 51 Bioastronomy. He served as chairman of the IAU Planetary Nebulae Working Group between 1994 and 2001, and as organizing committee member of the IAU Astrochemistry Working Group.

Martin Ward holds a Ph.D. in computer science from St. Annes College, Oxford University. He is a senior research fellow at DeMontfort University in England. He was previously a principal consultant, director and senior systems architect at Software Migrations, Ltd., as well as a visiting and research fellow and senior research assistant at the University of Durham. He has published extensively.

Библиографические данные