The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History, Politics, and Literature for the Year ...

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J. Dodsley, 1796
 

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Стр. 35 - The appearances of nature, and the occurrences of life, did not satiate his appetite of greatness. To paint things as they are, requires a minute attention, and employs the memory rather than the fancy.
Стр. 29 - If the father of criticism has rightly denominated poetry, an imitative art, these writers will, without great wrong, lose their right to the name of poets for they cannot be said to have imitated any thing; they neither copied nature nor life; neither painted the forms of matter, nor represented the operations of intellect.
Стр. 32 - In this part of his work Milton must be confessed to have equalled every other p'oet. He has involved in his account of the fall of man the events which preceded and those that were to follow it : he has interwoven the whole system of theology with such propriety that every part appears to be necessary; and scarcely any recital is wished shorter for the sake of quickening the progress of the main action.
Стр. 32 - Bossu is of opinion, that the poet's first work is to find a moral, which his fable is afterwards to illustrate and establish.
Стр. 29 - If, by a more noble and more adequate conception, that be considered as wit which is at once natural and new; that which, though not obvious, is, upon its first production, acknowledged to be just; if it be that which he that never found it wonders how he missed; to wit of this kind the metaphysical poets have seldom risen.
Стр. 37 - Lost' has this inconvenience, that it comprises neither human actions nor human manners. The man and woman who act and suffer are in a state which no other man or woman can ever know. The reader finds no transaction in which he can be engaged ; beholds no condition in which he can by any effort of imagination place himself; he has, therefore, little natural curiosity or sympathy.
Стр. 50 - James, whose skill in physic will be long remembered, and with David Garrick, whom I hoped to have gratified with this character of our common friend ; but what are the hopes of man ! I am...
Стр. 176 - With the love of a wench, let his writings be chaste ; Tip his tongue with strange matter, his pen with fine taste ; That the rake and the poet o'er all may prevail, Set fire to the head, and set fire to the tail.
Стр. 39 - But such airy beings are for the most part suffered only to do their natural office, and retire. Thus Fame tells a tale and Victory hovers over a general or perches on a standard; but Fame and Victory can do no more. To give them any real employment or ascribe to them any material agency is to...
Стр. 29 - ... that be confidered as Wit, which is at once natural and new, that which, though, not obvious, is, upon its firft production, acknowledged to be juft ; if it be that, which he that never found it, wonders how he miffed ; to wit of this kind the metaphyfical poets have feldom rifen.

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