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31. Select PASSAGES IN V1RSE.

Ulysses' Log. Feigned Courage - Miss Lamb. Beauty - Gay.

The Pleasures of Memory - Rogers. Ambition - Byron. Defi.

ance - Young. Affectionate Remembrance — Wordsworth, ... 160

35 Hymn, .................ADDISON,...... 105

36. Graves of a Household, ......... HEMANS, ...... 105

40. Select PassAGES IN VERSE.

Happiness - keble, Friendship – Wordsworth. Comfort in Adver.

sity – Southey. Futurity Dryden. Short-sightedness Trench,

Independence – Thomson. The Moral Law – Wordsworth. The

Ruined City, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

42. The Spring Shower, .....................117

43. Not to Myself Alone, .... . .. ... .. ....... 118

48. A Retrospective Review, .... .... Hoon, .......127

49. Address to the Indolent, ..

... THOMSON, .

53. The Father's Return, .....

• SOUTHEY,.

. . 136

54. The Carrier-pigeon, .....

. MOURE, .....

..137

55. Ode to Peace, ..

. . COWPER, ....

. . 137

59. The Launch of the Ship, ... .... LONGFELLOW,....143

60. Affectation, ..........

.... CUMBERLAND, ..

..144

63. Creation,............

...ADDISON,......

..149

66. God,............

.. DERZHAVIN, ....153

67. Expression in Reading, ..... .... LLOYD, ....... 155

68. The Return of the Dove,..

..MACKAY,. . . .

. . 156

72. Hymn of the Hebrew Maid,....... Scott, .......164

73. The Brave Man, ............ BURGER, ......165

78. SELECT PASSAGES IN VERSE.

A Prayer - Thomson. Providence Inscrutable --Addison. Essen-

tial Knowledge attainable by All — Wordsworth. Knowledge and

Wisdom Cowper. To Duty - Wordsworth. Death of the Young

and Fair-Conscientious Discharge of Duty Bryant. Hope and

Gloom - Whittier. Night -- Souhey. Love due to the Creator

- Grithn, .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

......177

.. . . .

79. Advance,................ M'Carthy,..... 179

85. First Voyage of Columbus, ........Joanna Baillie, . .191

38. Reciprocal kindness, . . . . .

. . COWPER, . . . . . . 197

91. Heroism of Grace Darling, ..

. .WORDS WORTH, ... 201

92. The Prairies, ........

... BRYANT,. . . . . . 205

96. The Hurricane, .......

... BRYANT, . . . . . . 211

100. To the Flying-fish, ........... Moore, .. . . .

101. The Village Preacher, ... • • • •

.... GOLDSMITH,.....

106. The Ship, . . . . . . . ..

... WILSON, .... ..228

110. When I am Old,......

... Miss BRIGGS,....238

111. Iymn of the Mountaineers, ..

...HEMANS, ....

.....239

113. True Courage, .............. BOWRING, . ...212

15. Mary Stuart and her Mourner, ......

. . . LYTTON, . . . . . . -44

Conversation Spoilers,.......... CO WP'ER, ......218

120. SELECT PASSAGES IN VERSE.

Trust in God - Young. He lives long who lives well – Rudolph.

Retirement -- Goldsmith. The Old Man by the Brook - Würils-

with. Freedom -- Bryant. Folly of Procrastination - Practical

Charity - Crabbe. The Guilty Conscience – Byron. Prayer —

Tennyson. Coronach - Scott, ................2.16

123. The Beautiful, ............. BURRINGTOX, .... 204

12. The Ploughman, ............HOLMES, . . . . . . 203

126. Elegy in a Country Churcb-yard, .....GRAY, .......272

128. Lord Ullin's Daughter, ..... .... CAMPBELL, .....276

133. Excelsior, ..............

.... LONGFELLOW, ...

134. Apologues in Verse, ........ CONGREVE, FRATZEL, POPE, 206

139. Strong Drink maketh Fools,..

I. Ourong Drink maketn F0019, . . . . . . .HEYWOOD, . . . . . WIE

140, The Lutist and Nightingale, ....... FORD, ....... 295

141. POETRY OF THE SEASONS. Part I.

The Tardy Spring – Whittier. The Blue-bird's Song — Stred.

Delights of Spring -- Howitt. First Warm Day of Spring - Horace

Smith. Welcome to Spring - Simms. The Birds of Spring-

Divine Bounty Manifest – Thomson, • .:::........ 297

145. In Rome, ............... ROGERS, .......07

146. SELECT PASSAGES IN VERSE.

Pleasures of llope -- Campbell. Fame - Pope. Death - Young,

Kosciusko - Campbell. The Captive's Dreams Hemans. On

Ancient Greece - Byron. The Banyan-tree – Moore. Gayety —

Cowper, . ... .. .. ... ...............309

156. A Storm on the Mountains, ....... Byron, ......333

157. A Wished-for Retreat, .......... WINCHELSEA, .... 334

158. John Littlejohn, ............ MACKAY,...... 336

159. POETRY OF THE SEASONS. Part II.

Sunrise in Summer - Thomson. Welcome of the Birds – Holmes.

To the Flowers Horace Smith. Summer Wind - Bryant, ...337

164. From Milton's “ Paradise Lost,” ............... 348

168. MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.

On the Death of a Friend — Halleck. Woman's Mission Elliott.

The Lee-shore - Hood. The Rhine. — From the German. Beauty and

the Dawn --- Arndt, ..................... 358

173. POETRY OF THE SEASONS. PART III.

A Beautiful Day in Autumu — Southey. An American Autumnal

Scene - November — Bryant. Hope Amid Decay, .......374

175. The Electric Telegraph,...................378

179. DRAMATIC EXTRACTS.

Effects of Oratory on a Multitude - Croly. Soliloquy of Van

Artevelde -- Taylor. Innocence — Titus before Jerusalem - Mil-

man. The Duke Aranza to Juliana - Tobin, .........383

180. The Colosseum by Moonlight, ....... BYRON, ......388

182. Passages froin Shakspeare ..................391

187. The Passions : an Ode, ......... COLLINS, ...... 402

190. SELECT PASSAGES IN Verse.

True Glory Milton. Consolation for a Friend's Death — Ib.

Truth – Cowper. Harmony of Expression - Pope. The Hope of

an Hereafter - Campbell, ..

.. ... 410

191. The Hen: a Fable, ........... From The German, . 412

192. The Chameleon,....

.... MERRICK, .

... 413

193. Affectation in the P

. . CowPER, ...

194. To the Sky-lark, ............ SHELLEY,...... 415

195. Ode on Cecilia's Day, .......... DRYDEN, ......416

199. The Treasures by the Wayside, ...... LYTTON, ....

201. The Souls of Books, . . . . . . . . . .

“ ......425

205. POETRY OF THE SEASONS. PART IV.

A Winter's Sabbath Scene - Grahame. The Snow-storm – Em-

erson. A Welcome to Winter - Thomson. The New Year-Willis, 433

206. Epistle to Arbuthnot, .......... POPE, ....... 435

207. The Chariot Race, ........... SOPHOCLES, . ....436

DIALOGUES.

149. Adam and Orlando, ........... SHAKSPEARE, . ...319

150. Isabella and Angelo, ...........

e.. 320

161. Gil Blas and the Archbishop,....... LE SAGE, ......340

162. The Trade of War,............ SCHILLER, .....343

165. Brutus and Cassius, ........... SRAKSPEARE, ....350

167. Franklin and the Gout, .

.

. FRANKLIN, ...

172. From Hamlet, ............. SHAKSPEARE, ... .371

199. Wolsey and Cromwell,. .........

. .421

PART III. EXPLANATORY INDEX,

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THE

FIRST-CLASS STANDARD READER.

PART I.

PRINCIPLES OF ELOCUTION.

GENERAL DIVISION.
SOUNDS AND LETTERS,

INFLECTION,
ARTICULATION,

PUNCTUATION, ETC.,
PRONUNCIATION, ETC.,

ON READING POETRY.

** The Lessons of this Part contain much that the memory should be repeatedly refreshed with ; and they have been constructed and arranged to serve as Reading Exercises, either after some of the simpler Exercises of Part II., or before, according to the capacity of pupils.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.

1. The ability to read aloud in an easy and agreeable manner ought to rank first among the physical and intellectual accomplishments of the young. Apart from the service it may enable us to render to others, is the benefit to health which the habit of exercising the voice, under proper restrictions, may afford. “Reading aloud, and recitation,” says Dr. Combe,“ are more useful and invigorating muscular exercises than is generally imagined.”

2. To attain a good elocutionary delivery, the articulation must be firm and complete, the pronunciation correct, the modulation or management of the voice appropriate, and the expression animated and sympathetic. In proportion as these conditions are complied with, the delivery will be distinct, significant, and impressive. Audibleness depends less on & loud voice than on a clear and faithful articulation.

3. It will thus be seen that there are three stages of advancement for the pupil. In the first, his attention is confined to the mechanical effort of uttering letters, syllables and words, with precision and ease ; in the second, which presupposes the first, he utters sentences according to their grammatical significance ; and in the third, which presupposes the first and second, he imparts the highest degree of expression and effect to what he delivers.

4. Orthoëpy, a word derived from the Greek orthon (upright) and èpo (I speak), signifies the right utterance of words. Orthoëpy determines words, and deals with language as it is spoken; orthography determines the correct spelling of words, and deals with language as it is written. Orthography addresses itself to the eye, Orthoëpy to the ear. Orthoëpy includes Articulation.

5. An articulate sound, from articŭlus, a Latin word for joint, is properly a sound which is preceded or followed by the closing of the organs of speech, or bringing some parts of the mouth in contact. A Consonant is, in the strict sense, an Articulation, or an Articulate Sound ; but, in use, the term is extended to Vowel sounds.

6. In anatomy the term articulation signifies the connection of the bones of the skeleton by joints. In Orthoëpy it may signify, in addition to its more extended meaning, the proper connection, in utterance, of the joints or syllables of words. Thus, in the words ap-pe-tite, gov-er-nor, we are directed by Articulation to pronounce every syllable distinctly, instead of fusing the second into the first, and pronouncing the words as if they were written thus : aptite, govnor. Articulation regulates the enunciation of letters also ; thus it directs us to give its proper sound to the h in such words as whale, what, which, shriek, shrunk, shrill, &c., where the sound of the italicized letter is often improperly dropped.

7. “In just articulation,” says Austin,“ the words are not hurriel over, nor melted together ; they are neither abridged nor prolonged ; they are not swallowed, nor are they shot from the mouth ; neither are they trailed, and then suffered to drop unfinished ; but they are delivered from the lips as beautiful coins are issued from the mint, deeply and accurately impressed, neatly struck by the proper organs, distinct, sharp, perfectly finished.”

8. Without a clear and accurate articulation, no person can give proper effect to language in the delivery. Precipitancy in speech, which drops some syllables and pronounces others too faintly, is the most common cause of a defective articulation. It must not, however, be supposed that a proper rapiility of utterance is inconsistent with distinctness. A habit of undue precision and deliberation in enunciating is quite as offensive as the haste which confounds syllables and words. But the extreme of speaking too fast is the more common fault. To pronounce with accuracy and completeness, even though it be slowly, is the first thing to be studied.

9. An indistinct articulation is often the result of mere indolence or inattention. There must be energetic muscular action of the vocal organs, or your utterance will become inanimate and ineffective. A full inhalation of the breath, a vigorous expulsion of it, a steady exercise of the muscles called into play, are all essential to the attainment of a good delivery.

10. In commencing a course of reading exercises, it will be well to revive our recollections of the first principles of elocution. In doing this, we will consider, first, the simple elementary sounds produced for the utterance of the English language. These sounds must be thoroughly understood, and correctly practised, before the complicate sounds flowing from them into speech can be enunciated with ease, propriety, and force.

QUESTIONS.-2. What is necessary to a good elocution ? 4. What is the distinction between Orthoepy and Orthography ? 5, 6. What is an Articulate Sound ? Explain the derivation of the word articulate. 8. What is the most common cause of a bad articular tion! 9. Mention another cause.

LESSON II.

SOUNDS AND LETTERS.

11. The primary division of our articulate sounds is into Vowels and Consonants. The Vowels, that is, the Vowel Letters, are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y, which last two are called Semi-Vowels or Half-Vowels. A, o, u, and w, represent the broad Vowel Sounds ; e, i, and y, the small Vowel Sounds.

12. The Consonants, that is, the Consonant Letters, are pb, fv, td, kg, sz; h; l, m, n, r;j, c, 9, X, and sometimes w and y. Here we have, first, the representatives of those consonant sounds allied in the manner of formation or utterance, and called Cognate, from two Latin words, con and nascor, signifying related by birth. These sounds are arranged in pairs, because of their relationship. Then we have the Aspirate h, which simply represents a breathing sound, as in hap, hold. Thirdly, we have the Liquids l, m, n, r; and lastly, the double letter j, with the redlundant signs C, 1, and r.

13. There is another classification of Consonants, sometimes adopted. It has reference to the organs by which they are uttered, whether chiefly by the lips, the teeth, or the palate. B, p, f, v, and m, have been called Labials. D, 1, 3, 2, j, and g (this last when equivalent to j), and c when equivalent to s, have been called Dentals. K, S, r, l, and c (this last when equivalent to k), have been called Palatals. Kand g are sometimes called Gutturals, from the Latin worl guttur, the gullet or throat. S and z are also sometimes called Sibilants, from the Latin word sibilans hissing), in consequence of the hissing sound attending their production. M and n are also callel Nusals, from their relations to the nose ; I and T, Linguals, from their relations to the tongue.

14. In Dr. Rush's classification, there are, I. Twelve Tonic sounds, ag represented in the Vowels and Diphthongs of the following words · A-11, z-rt, a-n, a-le, ou-r, i-sle, 0-ld, ee-1, 00-ze, e-rr, e-nd, i-n. These twelve

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