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often used to say that he knew every one in Edinburgh except a few new-comers, and to walk Princes Street with him was to realize that this was nearly a literal fact.”

Besides Rab and his Friends, Dr. Brown wrote a number of sketches of dogs he had known; he wrote also a delightful account of Pet Marjorie, a bright little girl, who was a friend of Walter Scott, and a number of papers, half medical, half literary. These writings preserve a memory of his kindly genius; but after all, really to know the man one would need to have heard his friends and neighbors speak of him: was not so much through his books as through his personal presence that he fixed himself in the minds of people. One of his friends thus writes of him:

Perhaps the time and place his friends will most naturally recall in thinking of him is a winter afternoon, the gas lighted, the fire burning clearly, and he seated in his own chair in the drawing-room (that room that was so true a reflection of his character), the evening paper in his hand, but not so deeply interested in it as not to be quite willing to lay it down. If he were reading, and you were unannounced, you had almost reached his chair before the adjustment of his spectacles allowed him to recognize who had come; and the bright look, followed by “It's you, is it?' was something to remember. The summary of the daily news of the town was brought to him at this hour, and the varied characters of those who brought it out put him in possession of all shades of opinion, and enabled him to look at things from every point of view. If there had been a racy lecture, or one with some absurdities in it, or a good concert, a rush would be made to Rutland Street to tell Dr. Brown, and no touch of enthusiasm or humor in the narration was thrown away upon him.”

In the latter part of his life he suffered from seasons of melancholy, which shadowed his beautiful spirit. He died May 11, 1882.

often used to say that he knew every one in Edinburgh except a few new-comers, and to walk Princes Street with him was to realize that this was nearly a literal fact.”

Besides Rab and his Friends, Dr. Brown wrote a number of sketches of dogs he had known; he wrote also a delightful account of Pet Marjorie, a bright little girl, who was a friend of Walter Scott, and a number of papers, half medical, half literary. These writings preserve a memory of his kindly genius; but after all, really to know the man one would need to have heard his friends and neighbors speak of him: it was not so much through his books as through his personal presence that he fixed himself in the minds of people. One of his friends thus writes of him: “Perhaps the time and place his friends will most naturally recall in thinking of him is a winter afternoon, the gas lighted, the fire burning clearly, and he seated in his own chair in the drawing-room (that room that was so true a reflection of his character), the evening paper in his hand, but not so deeply interested in it as not to be quite willing to lay it down. If he were reading, and you were unannounced, you had almost reached his chair before the adjustment of his spectacles allowed him to recognize who had come; and the bright look, followed by • It's you, is it?' was something to remember. The summary of the daily news of the town was brought to him at this hour, and the varied characters of those who brought it out put him in possession of all shades of opinion, and enabled him to look at things from every point of view. If there had been a racy lecture, or one with some absurdities in it, or a good concert, a rush would be made to Rutland Street to tell Dr. Brown, and no touch of enthusiasm or humor in the narration was thrown away upon him.”

In the latter part of his life he suffered from seasons of melancholy, which shadowed his beautiful spirit. He died May 11, 1882.

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enduring, much-perspiring shepherd, who, with a gleam of joy over his broad visage, delivered a terrific facer upon our large, vague, benevolent, middleaged friend, — who went down like a shot.

Still the Chicken holds ; death not far off. “Snuff! a pinch of snuff !” observed a calm, highly dressed young buck, with an eyeglass in his eye. Snuff, indeed!” growled the angry crowd, affronted and glaring. “ Snuff! a pinch of snuff !” again observed the buck, but with more urgency; whereon were produced several open boxes, and from a mull which may have been at Culloden, he took a pinch, knelt down, and presented it to the nose of the Chicken. The laws of physiology and of snuff take their course; the Chicken sneezes, and Yarrow is free!

The young pastoral giant stalks off with Yarrow in his arms, - comforting him.

But the bull terrier's blood is up, and his soul unsatisfied; he grips the first dog he meets, and discovering she is not a dog, in Homeric phrase, he makes a brief sort of amende, and is off. The boys, with Bob and me at their head, are after him: down Niddry Street he goes, bent on mischief; up the Cowgate like an arrow,

Bob and I, and our small men, panting behind.

There, under the single arch of the South Bridge, is a huge mastiff, sauntering down the middle of the causeway, as if with his hands in his pockets: he is old, gray, brindled, as big as a little Highland bull, and has the Shakespearian dewlaps shaking as he goes.

The Chicken makes straight at him, and fastens on his throat. To our astonishment, the great creature does nothing but stand still, hold himself

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roar, yes, roar; a long, serious, remonstrative roar. How is this? Bob and I are up to them. He is muzzled ! The bailies had proclaimed a general muzzling, and his master, studying strength and economy mainly, had encompassed his huge jaws in a home-made apparatus, constructed out of the leather of some ancient breechin. His mouth was open as far as it could ; his lip curled up in rage,

a sort of terrible grin ; his teeth gleaming, ready, from out the darkness; the strap across his mouth tense as a bowstring; his whole frame stiff with indignation and surprise ; his roar asking us all round, “Did you ever see the like of this ? "

He looked a statue of anger and astonishment, done in Aberdeen granite.

We soon had a crowd : the Chicken held on. knife!” cried Bob; and a cobbler gave him his knife: you know the kind of knife, worn away obliquely to a point, and always keen. I put its edge to the tense leather; it ran before it; and then !

one sudden jerk of that enormous head, a sort of dirty mist about his mouth, no noise, — and the bright and fierce little fellow is dropped, limp and dead. A solemn pause: this was more than any

of us had bargained for. I turned the little fellow over, and saw he was quite dead; the mastiff had taken him by the small of the back like a rat, and broken it.

He looked down at his victim appeased, ashamed, and amazed ; snuffed him all over, stared at him, and taking a sudden thought, turned round and trotted off. Bob took the dead dog up, and said, “ John, we'll bury him after tea.” “ Yes,” said I, and was off after the mastiff. He made up the Cowgate at a rapid swing ; he had forgotten some engagement. He turned up the Candlemaker Row, and stopped at the Harrow Inn.

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