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23. At 67. (loorge Square, James Mitchell, cldest daughter of the deceased John Davie, Esq. late of son of John B. Gracic, Esq. W. S.

Brotherton. - At Brighton, Major Hugh Falconar, late of 25. At his house, New Farm, Dalkeith, Mr John Newton.

Lyon, aged 90 years. - At South Wellington Place, Glasgow, Eleanor, - At Edinburgh, Elizabeth Mary Keir, daugheighth daughter of Mr James Macqueen.

ter of James Keir, Esq. physician, Moscow. At her house, in Yerk Terrace, Regent's - At Edinburgh, Mr William Richardson, wool, Park, London, Mrs Grant, widow of Charles Grant, lendraper. Esq. late one of the Directors of the East India 27. At his Lodge, All Souls College, Oxford, Company:

after a long illness, the Hon. and Right Rev. Ed. 21, At her house, 53, Bristo Street, Miss Jean ward Legge, Lord Bishop of Oxford, and Warden Baillie, aged 75, daughter of the late Mr Matthew of All Souls College in that University. Baillie.

- At Edinburgh, Mrs Mary M'Lean, widow of - At Wellshot House, pear Glasgow, aged 65 Dr Hector M'Lean, Inspector of Hospitals. years, Wm. Forlong, Esq. of Wellshot,

Lately. Mrs Byrne (late Miss Byrne), of the 25. At Glasgow, Walter M‘Innes, Esq. of Au Theatres Royal Drury Lane, Dublin, and Glaschenfroe, aged 71 years.

gow. - At Brotherton, Miss Isabella Davie, third

ALEXANDER HENDERSON, ESQ. OF PRESS. It is with feelings of regret, which we entertain until Monday morning about one o'clock, when in common with our fellow-citizens, that we have it terminated his existence.-The most remark. to announce the death of our late highly respect able feature in the public as well as private coned Chief Magistrate, Alexander Henderson, Esq. duct of Mr Henderson, was his kind and conci. of Press. During the period in which Mr Render. liatory disposition. It was this truly enviable quason filled the Civic Chair he had a serious attack lity, together with his frank and homely manner, of a complaint in the stomach, the peculiar nature which, during the bustling period he filled the imof which his medical attendants never fully ascer. portant office of Lord Provost of the City of Edin. tained, but from the effects of which he had sere burgh, obtained for him an unparalleled degree of ral months since completely recovered. A few popularity, and not only neutralised all hostile days ago, however, the complaint relapsed upon feelings towards him, but converted into real him, and on Saturday evening the 3d inst., about friendship the minds of those who were most inieight o'clock, he was taken violently ill: the dis mical to the views which it was his object to proease continued to increase throughout Sunday, and mote.

GEORGE JARDINE, ESQ. On the 28th January, died at Glasgow College, of severity, Strict in discipline, but perfectly imGeorge Jardine, Esq. Professor of Logic in that partial, wise, and affectionate in all that he reUniversity, in the 85th year of his age.

quired, his students submitted with cheerfulness to of the many eminent men who have adorned his directions, and loved, while they revered, their the Universities of Scotland, few have enjoyed so instructor. Their welfare habitually occupied his large a share of public respect and confidence. thoughts; and to improve the means of education Endowed with a vigorous and active mind, with was the ruling passion of his life. Warmly attache great svundness of judgment--possessing a deep ed to the interests of those intrusted to his charge, sense of the importance of his ofhce, and an ardent he einbraced every opportunity of imparting to desire to promote the improvement of his students, them the admonitions of a father, of cherishing he devoted himself to his public duties with a religious principle by remindmg them of their zeal, an activity, and a faithfulness, which hare higher duties, and guarding them against the dan. never been surpassed, and but rarely equalled. gers to which they were exposed. In the same Directed by that discernment of what was inost spirit, he attended with them on the pablic servi. useful, and best suited to the circumstances of his ces of religion, directed them to exercises suited pupils, for which, through life, he was distin. to the evenings of the Sabbath, and enforced the guished, he, soon after his appointment in 1774, sacred instructions which on that day they had reintroduced those changes in the mode of public ceived. teaching which rendered bis class so long a model Such a teacher, so conducting himself for the of academical instruction. Retaining what was unusually long period of fifty years, could not most important in ancient Logie, and communi. fail to be the instrument of extensive usefulness, cating a due knowledge of its peculiarities, he dis. and to be remembered by his pupils with gramissed from his course of lectures all its unprofit titude and reverence. Acrordingly, his benero able subtleties, directing the attention of the youth lent mind was gratified by seeing very many of to such views of the human mind, its powers and them rising to eminence, retaining for him the operations, as might lead to their proper exercise, respect and affection of their early days, and grateand furnish the best means of their improvement fully ascribing to the benefit of his instructions -But, aware that truths might be heard without that distinction to which they had attained in the attention, or without awakening the powers of the various departments of society. understanding, and that the formation of intelee. The private life of this venerable man was dis. tual and moral habits is the first object of educa tinguished by active and well-directed benevotion, he devised a practical system of examina lence-with great judgement, prudence, and per tions and exercises, which he gradually improved severenee, in all his undertakings. Afled nately to an extent that has seldom been witnessed. By tender in his family-susccpuble of the strongest a discriminating selection of topics, he direeted attachment-compassionate to the unfortunatnes his students to the subjects most deserving their and ever exerting himself to promote the welfare consideration, while he awakened their curiosity, of those around him, sew men have possessed sustained their attention, and exercised in due more warmly, or more extensively, the affections proportion every faculty of their minds. The of his friends. Even to the last his mind retained youth were thus kept continually alive to the ob a great portion of its usual clasticity and vigour. jects of study, and subjects naturally dry and un The academical society, which he had so long interesting were, from the manner in which they adorned, preserved to the end a firm hold of his were illustrated, rendered attractive, and prosecu regard ; and, ever zealous for the welfare and ted with avidity and enthusiasm. Hence, the Lo honour of the University of Glasgow, it occupied gic Class of the University, though a class of la a great portion of his thought even in the latest bour, was always looked forward to with a feeling days of his life. of elevated expectation, and the period of its at Within its walls his character will ever be retendance is generally recollected by the student as membered with grateful reverenee, and his name among the busiest but the happiest years of his will descend to posterity as the name of one who, academical course.

by his labours, has raised its reputation and acFew classes have ever displayed such order and quired a lasting title to the gratitude of his coun such attention to business, with so little exercise try.

Printed by James Ballantyne and Company, Edinburgh.

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CXXIV.

APRIL, 1827.

Voi. XXI.

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"Contents
The SURPLUS POPULATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM,
TRE HOMES OF ENGLAND,
STEAM NAVIGATION,
THE BLACK WATCH,
The FINE ARTS,
VEBNAL STANZAS,
ODE TO THE Moon,
LE REVENANT,
A SUBALTERN IN AMERICA.

Chap.
Chap. VI.
Chap. VII.

Chap. VIII.
The SHEPHERD'S CALENDAR. BY THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD.

Sheep,
Prayers,

Odd Characters,
SELWYN IN SEARCH OF A DaughTER.

Chap. VII.

Chap. VIII.
HORÆ GERMANICÆ. No. XXIII.

Werner's Twenty-fourth of February,
NOCTES AMBROSIANÆ, No. XXXII.
WORKS PREPARING FOR PUBLICATION,
MONTHLY LIST OF New PubliCATIONS,

417 420 426 430

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EDINBURGH:
WILLIAM BLACKWOOD, No. 17, PRINCE'S STREET, EDINBURGH ;

AND T. CADELL, STRAND, LONDON ;
To whom Communications (post puid) may be addressed.

SOLD ALSO BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY JAMES BALLANTYNE & CO. EDINBURGH.

SPEEDILY WILL BE PUBLISHED,
BY WILLIAM BLACKWOOD, EDINBURGH ; AND T. CADELL, LONDON;

I.
In One Volume Octavo,

HISTORY

OF THE

PROGRESS AND SUPPRESSION

OP

THEREFORMATION

IN

ITALY AND SPAIN,

DURING THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY.

BY THOMAS M'CRIE, D.D.

II.

(In April)
In 3 vols. Post Octavo,

THE

YOUTH AND MANHOOD

OF

CYRIL THORNTON,

Have I not heard great ordnance in the field,
And Heaven's artillery thunder in the skies;
Have I not, in a pitched battle, heard
Loud 'larums, neighing steeds, and trumpets clang !

TAMING OF THE SHREW.

The Lists of Deaths, Promotions, fc. are omitted for want of room.

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Three years ago, in an Article enti- ed upon falsehood and error-it is a tled Ireland, we strongly recommend very amazing thing that we have not ed that Government should promote a huge deficiency of inhabitants, inemigration on a large scale from the sis- stead of an alarming superabundance. ter island. Do we still hold the same This, cry the eulogists, is "the age of opinion? Hold the same opinion on industry"_" the age of the people” any subject for three years together ! -"the age of comfort for the poor”! how can our readers, in these days, ex- and lo, and behold ! industry, and pect it? When we look at the changes the people, and the poor, are reduced which have taken place in these three to the most deplorable penury and years—at the changes of law and sys. wretchedness. According to every tem-at the reversals of view and principle of both, this country ought principle in the Cabinet and Parlia- at this moment to have infinitely more ment, in Ministers, and those public employment for its population, than cations which, up to a recent period, it ever had at any former period. The were thought to rank amidst the most silk trade has been opened, and we honest and respectable ones—we are are buying a considerable part of our constrained to fear, that it is some silks of foreigners for much less than what discreditable to hold the same our own manufacturers charged us; sentiments for three years in succes in consequence, a large number of sion. Nevertheless we still think as weavers and throwsters have lost we thought at the commencement of their employment. But then, it is the period, on the point we have men said, the community, from the cheaptioned, and likewise on many others. ness of the foreign silks, must have

The superabundance of population more money to buy other things with ; was then confined to Ireland; it has therefore the total effective demand now extended itself to England, and of the whole nation for labour, and Scotland likewise. There is at pre- the produce of labour, cannot have sent a grievous excess of inhabitants been diminished ; and, of course, in almost all parts of the whole Uni- these weavers and throwsters must ted Kingdom. This excess has as be employed in some other calling, sumed so formidable an aspect, that while the produce of their labour Government is maturing a gigantic must be a clear addition to the pubscheme of emigration to get rid of it. lic wealth. The Navigation Laws

If there be a single tittle of truth in have been abolished, and, in consewhat is called Political Economy_if quence, foreign ships are carrying for the new system be not wholly bottom The nation must therefore have VOL. XXI.

3 с

us.

ors,

more money to expend in other things; threat, and those who have uttered it of course the total effective demand Speak of refutation !-look aroundfor labour cannot have been injured, examine the state of the country-oband the discharged shipwrights, sail serve the decline of trade, manufac

&c. &c. must be making vast clear tures and revenue, the distress of al. additions to the public wealth in new most every business, and the penury callings. By our new system at home and misery of the working classes ! and in the colonies, we have added Here is refutation-the most terrible greatly to the riches of some other and decisive refutation-but it overnations, and this must have added whelms the Economists, Ministers, greatly to our trade with these nations. and Parliament, and not ourselves. Wheat has been for some time as It confirms our principles and predic. cheap as, according to the enemies of tions to the letter. The condition of the Corn Laws, free trade could ren- the nation furnishes the most signal der it; and this must have been vaste and complete refutation of what is ly beneficial to trade and manuface called Political Economy-of that Po« tures. We have, in the last twelve litical Economy on which the Ministry months, imported nearly as much fo- and Legislature are acting—which reign corn, as, according to Mr Mø. could be given. Culloch, we shall be able to import Ministers must have found the putwith free trade; and this must have ting forth of the Emigration Report increased immensely our export of a very awkward piece of business. After manufactures. The price of most are giving such splendid descriptions of ticles has been long very low, and this what commerce and manufactures must have added prodigiously to ma were about to soar to, and when the nufactures and trade. Wages have wholesale changes which were to reafallen greatly, and this must have add. lise these descriptions, were coming ed greatly to profits. Labour is so into full operation, to be compelled to cheap in the cotton trade, that the confess that a large portion of the comprofits of the cotton manufacturers munity had lost, and could not remust be large, almost beyond calcula- cover, its employment, must have been tion. From the effects of the new sys- almost as bitter work, as the eating in tem and accident, we ought to have- public of their own words, is to people. taking the increase of population into The Report is a most remarkable prothe account-almost double the em- duction. It in reality, though not in ployment for labour of what we ever terms, flatly controverts some of the had previously,

leading tenets of the Ricardo school, If this be not the case-if the re and proclaims that Ministers are acte verse be the case-if trade and manu- ing on erroneous and ruinous princifactures be in the most unprosperous ples. Yet Ministers, while they put condition and if there be that excess forth a report like this, practically asof population which the government sert that these tenets and principles are admits—what are we to think of that most true and wise ; Mr Wilmot HorScience" on which Ministers are a ton, the official parent of the report, vowedly acting? Certain turncoat pub- maintains that the emigration plan is lications threaten that time will speedie sanctioned by both, and avows that he ly overwhelm all who think as we ilo, acts under the counsel and instruction with refutation. In so far as we are of Mr M'Culloch ! concerned, we laugh to scorn, both the According to the Report, the effect

* According to the public prints, Mr Wilmot Horton lately informed Parliament, that in communicating with Mr M'Culloch, he had agreed with him on thirty questions. What a wonderful man must Mr Wilmot Horton be, to agree on thirty points with such a wonderful Economist! A minister of the British empire boasts that he consults, and on thirty different points agrees with the man who holds, that if all our land-owners should expend their incomes abroad, it would be the same to the country as their expending them at home;-that high prices of corn tax farmers and landlords, and that low prices are beneficial to both ;--that the lower wages are, the higher profits must be, and the higher wages are, the lower profits must be ;that the colonies of this empire do it prodigious injury ;-that we could be a great

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