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Israel forth, he enriched him with the spoils of the Egyptians; and like Jacob's flock, not one feeble among them.' In like manner, the church of God was received with kindness by the nations: Antichrist wished to retain her for her own ends; but God will ulti mately bring forth his church with the glory and honour of the nations with her. The birth of Jacob's sons, and the names he inspir. edly gave them, will fall to be considered after.

Chap. XXXI.-This chapter records the singular deliverance of Jacob and his household from the house of Laban, enriched from the Rocks of his oppressor; as his posterity, in after ages, came out of Egypt, • with silver and gold, and there was not one feeble among their tribes.' Psal. cv. 37. The attentive reader will also observe, that in Rachel stealing the gods of Laban, there is a wonderful simi larity to that judgment which came upon the gods of Egypt,' when Israel came forth from among them; and for an explication of both events, he will look forward to that period of which Isaiah prophesied, " In that day a man shall cast his idols of silver, and his idols of gold, which they made, each man for himself to worship, to the moles and to the bats.' Isaiah ii. 20. In that day, the great and true Rachel, the Gentile church, shall steal from Antichrist even het very gods. It will be observed, that the word here translated God, is Teraphim. It is not our province to speculate upon a subject which has so much occupied the attention of the learned, as the word Teraphim; but the following remarks may not be improper. Whatever the word originally implies, it is evidently plural; and from the best account that can be traced of its form, it was a representation of the Trinity in Unity. As the Cherubim were attendant on public worship, the Teraphim corresponded with what the ancients called their household gods. The Teraphim had therefore a direct reference origin. ally to the revelation which it had pleased God to make of himself in Trinity, but became evidently a source of idolatry, which we shall have farther occasion to trace in the history even of Jacob's family, and still more in that of Micah, Judges xvii. 5. In the succeeding part of this chapter, we have an account of Laban's pursuit of Ja. cob; the preventing care of God in restraining him from hurting Jacob; the remonstrance that took place; the reconciliation and agreement; and Laban's return. Keeping in view the typical cha. racter in which both parties are to be viewed, the design of God, in all that is here recorded, will appear simple and striking ; unfolding the gracious manner in which he who slumbers not nor sleeps protects his feeble church from those who would overwhelm her. We would recommend to the reader's attention, Jacob's remarkable account of his painful servitude ; • That which was torn of beasts I brought not to thee: I bare the loss of it: of my hand didst thou re. quire it, whether stolen by day, or stolen by night. Thus I was : in the day the drought consumed me, and the frost by night; and my sleep departed from mine eyes,' verse 39, 40. Who can read these words without thinking of the Great Shepherd of the sheep? He could truly say, he was exposed for his sheep to sufferings of the Chap. XXIX. The domestic occurrences of Jacob's family are kere recorded in a manner we may be well assured would not have been done, had not a greater personage than Jacob, and a more im. portant family than his natural seed, been intended.

As our object, however, is shortly to glance at such passages as have not been at. tended to in the Bibliotheca Sacra, we shall not have occasion to en. ter very minutely into this chapter. Jacob, who had lain down in Bethel, a poor solitary wanderer, arose under the assured protection and blessing of Almighty God. He therefore, like the Eunuch, goes on his way rejoicing. Here we find again a well the place of meeting, and watering of sheep an important office; and thus we see the cause, not only why a well is so often used to point out the

gospel, but how interesting a view is intended of the office of Jesus Christ, when he is called the Great Shepherd of the sheep.' The prophet Hosea says, (chap. xii. 12.), Jacob Aled into the country of Syria, 6 and Israel served for a wife, and for a wife he kept sheep.' In all this transaction we have a most beautiful representation of the service of Christ for his church. Both Rachel and Leah, the Old and New Testament mothers, he purchased by his service of love. We read twice in this chapter, of fulfilling her week,' referring doubtless to the seven days' feast, &c. usual on such occasions, Judges xiv. 12. But this also furnishes a proof of the early division of time by sevens, as was indeed the case with Noah in the ark. This furnishes no slight evidence of the early observation of the Sabbath.

CHAP. XXX.—continues the history of Jacob's family during the twenty-one years service and bondage in the house of a kinsman, Laban. The reader will remark the three sevens in which the church of God was in the house of bondage. And during this period, we find the bondwoman used to raise up seed to Jacob, as Hagar was by Sarah. We

may also observe, that the earnestness for children manifested both by Rachel and Leah, proceeded from the anxious hope of the promised Messiah to spring from the root of Jacob. The circumstance of the mandrakes is a very singular one, and we have no doubt has an important meaning, were it understood. We profess ourselves incapable of throwing light upon it. We have only further to remark on this chapter, that the means to which Jacob was guided by heaven, to enrich himself, is another of those portions of sacred history which extremely puzzles many friends of scripture. On this passage, Bishop Wilson says, « This will not justify every man

now to use such arts to increase his substance. The gospel has • restored justice to her original rights. A little attention will give a more satisfactory solution to it. Jacob is here in the house of bondage ; and Laban is loth to part with him, for his own interest. He therefore

his stay, and at length God enriched Jacob from Laban's flocks. The reader will remember how Jacob's posterity were received into the house of bondage in Egypt from kindness, as Laban received Jacob at first. When the king arose who knew not Joseph, and when Israel, like Jacob, wished to depart, Pharaoh would not let him go, for his own interest. When God at last led Israel forth, he enriched him with the spoils of the Egyptians; and like Jacob's flock, not one feeble among them.' In like manner, the church of God was received with kindness by the nations : Antichrist wished to retain her for her own ends ; but God will ultimately bring forth his church with the glory and honour of the nations with her. The birth of Jacob's sons, and the names he iáspiredly gave them, will fall to be considered after.

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CHAP. XXXI.-This chapter records the singular deliverance of Jacob and his household from the house of Laban, enriched from the flocks of his oppressor ; as his posterity, in after ages, came out of Egypt, with silver and gold, and there was not one feeble among their tribes,' Psal. cv. 37. The attentive reader will also observe, that in Rachel stealing the gods of Laban, there is a wonderful similarity to that judgment which came upon the gods of Egypt,' when Israel came forth from among them; and for an explication of both events, he will look forward to that period of which Isaiah prophe sied, In that day a man shall cast his idols of silver, and his idols of gold, which they made, each man for himself to worship, to the moles and to the bats,' Isaiah ii. 20. In that day, the great and true Rachel, the Gentile church, shall steal from Antichrist even her very gods. It will be observed, that the word here translated God, is Teraphim. It is not our province to speculate upon a subject which has so much occupied the attention of the learned, as the word Tera. phim ; but the following remarks may not be improper. Whatever the word originally implies, it is evidently plurat ; and from the best account that can be traced of its form, it was a representation of the Trinity in Unity. As the Cherubim were attendant on public wor. ship, the Teraphim corresponded with what the ancients called their household gods. The Teraphim had therefore a direct reference ori. ginally to the revelation which it had pleased God to make of himself in Trinity, but became evidently a source of idolatry, which we shall have farther occasion to trace in the history even of Jacob's family, and still more in that of Micah, Judges xvii

. 5. In the succeeding part of this chapter, we have an account of Laban's pursuit of Jacob; the preventing care of God in restraining him from hurting Ja. cob; the remonstrances that took place ; the reconciliation and agreement ; and Laban's return. Keeping in view the typical cha. racter in which both parties are to be viewed, the design of God, in all that is here recorded, will appear simple and striking ; unfolding the gracious manner in which he who slumbers not nor sleeps protects his feeble church from those who would overwhelm her. We would recommend to the reader's attention, Jacob's remarkable ac. count of his painful servitude ; " That which was torn of beasts I brought not to thee : I bare the loss of it: of my hand didst thou requare it, whether stolen by day, or stolen by night. Thus I was : in the day the drought consumed me, and the frost by night ; and my sleep departed from mine eyes,' verses 39, 40. Who can read these words without thinking of the Great Shepherd of the sheep? He could truly say, he was exposed for his sheep to sufferings of the

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severest kind, and of all that the Father gave him, he lost none. It is noticeable, that Jacob twice mentions in this chapter, the fear of his father Isaac, verses 42. 53. There seems to be a reference in this expression to the remarkable fear of his father, mentioned xxvii. 33. he trembled very exceedingly. The overruling purpose of God, who says, · Jacob have I loved,' appeared so powerfully to his mind, and the part he had been acting in attempting to withstand God, sa awfully affected him, that he trembled very exceedingly; and Jacob was there taught to view the character of God in a point of view which he never afterwards forgot.

This chapter alludes to several ancient customs, which merit the reader's attention. Jacob received cattle as his wages ; and as cattle were formerly the only medium of trade, ancient coins were stamped sometimes with an ox, but more generally with a lamb. piece of metal, or stone, with the image of an ox or lamb, was cur. rent for the value of these animals; and thus the very word used in verse 41. Heb. monim, is translated by the Greek amnades, or lambs ; hence the Latin

word pecunia is derived from pecus, a flock of sheep. Hence the old Greek proverb, Boos epi gloptes, he has the ox upon his tongue, that is, when applied to a witness, he has been bribed not to speak. When Jacob and Laban were reconciled, they joined in sacrifice, and eat the flesh of the victim, having gathered stones and made a heap. This garar, or heap, was their altar; and this is the name given to those sacred heaps, which were afterwards frequent a. mong idolatrous nations. In our own island, the Druids had their sairns, or heaps of stones, where they held their religious feasts. Not a few of such heaps are still extant in Britain. Here also, Jacob erected a pillar. *Pillars erected near the altars, were of divine original ; hence the pillars in Solomon's temple; and thus the church herself is a monumental pillar to the truth, erected near God's altar, These heaps and pillars were afterwards adopted by idolaters, and the Israelites were commanded to throw them down.

CHAP. XXXII.--contains much important matter, highly deserving serious attention and inquiry. Leaving Laban, Jacob goes on his way, and the angels of God met him. “This,' said Jacob, « is God's host, and he called the name of that place Mahanaim.' Jacob, delivered from Laban, and going on his way, sees that the whole host, of God, the two camps, as Mahanąim means, are in his defence ;' are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister to the heirs of salvation ? Jacob had seen these angels ascending and descending on the ladder at Bethel, Gen. xxviii. 12., and he now sees them encamped; compare Psalm xxxiv. 6, 7. When the heavenly hosts are call. ed two camps, we may think of the two cherubims of glory which overshadowed the mercy-seat. The reference to Song vi. 12. has often been noticed; but if the company of two armies there mentioned, be the Maharaim, then they are not in the Shulamite, but attending her. This meeting with God's host must have been a great support to Jacob's mind, in the view of encountering his power ful, and, as he feared, his hostile brother, Esau, For the character

of Esau, and his typical station, the scripture leaves us in no doubt. God, who promised to bring Jacob again to his father's house in peace, supports and carries him through every difficulty. Laban may pursue behind, and Esau may meet in front, but with the di. vine promise, and the Mahanaim of God surrounding him, who can injure or hurt him ? Jacob's prayer on this occasion is one of the most remarkable in all the sacred page. We cannot attempt to analyze it; but the reader will easily discover in it the genuine spirit of grace

and of supplication. The division into two bands, will lead the reader's mind to the Jewish and Gentile churches, and prove a key to the language of the prophet, • The one I called beauty, and the other I called bands, and I fed the flock,' Zech. xi. 7.

From the 24th verse of this chapter, we have an account of Jacob's wrestling with the Man, Jehovah ; an incident of the most wonder. ful kind. That this man was the angel of the covenant, a prophet of the Lord assures us, Micah xii. 4.; and Jacob himself said, I have seen God face to face ;' yea it is farther said, verse 28. " a prince hast thou power with the elohim,' (gods). This night of wrestling of Jacob, is a figure of the situation of his church, until the morning of her complete deliverance, at the breaking of the day. Although Jacob prevailed and obtained the blessing, yet God taught him to know that it was not in his own strength, for a single touch disjointed his thigh. Israel, the prince of God, is now the name of Jacob, the supplanter, as he stands a type and representative of the true prince that hath power with God, who intercedes and prevails in behalf of all his church. Israel is now the name of the whole church of God; and when, at the breaking of the day, she prevails, she then also obtains her new name, Isaiah lxii. 4. Rev. iii. 12.

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CHAP. XXXIII.-relates the meeting and affectionate interview of Jacob with Esau ; so true is it, that when a man's ways please the Lord, he maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him.' But we are here never to lose sight of Jacob as the leader of the two bands, going on before them to meet the enemy of their journey ; in the same manner as he afterwards procured them peace from a still more formidable enemy. Egypt, and Antichrist herself, have often dealt favourably with Jacob's bands. Esau returns to the fortified .city, Edom

; and Jacob to Succoth, the place of booths. In like manner shall we always find Antichrist in her strong holds, and the church of the God of Jacob in her house of sojourning and pilgrimage. Jacob, the inheriter of the promises of Canaan, has no possession in it, but buys a parcel of a field to spread his tabernacle, and build his altar ; and he names his altar, expressive of his faith in God, the God of Israel.

CHAP. XXXIV.-We have hitherto seen Jacob retarded and im. peded in his return to his father's house, by external enemies ; but we are in this chapter called to consider him amidst still more afflictions, arising in the bosom of his own family. In like manner, it will be found, that in all the appearances of the church of God, afflicted and

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