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NASH, THOMAS (1567-1601)

Spring, the sweet Spring, is the year's pleasant
king (Spring)

1
NORTON, CAROLINE ELIZABETH SARAH - (afterwards
LADY STIRLING-MAXWELL) (1808–1877)

I do not love thee kno! I do not love thee 341
O'SHAUGHNESSY, ARTHUR WILLIAM EDGAR (1844-
1881)
We are the music-makers (Ode).

474
PATMORE, COVENTRY KERSEY DIGHTON (1823-1896)

My little Son, who look'd from thoughtful eyes
(The Toys)

444
why, having won her, do I woo (The married
Lover)

443
PEACOCK, THOMAS LOVE (1785–1866)

I dug, beneath the cypress shade (The Grave of
Love)

322
Seamen three i What men be ye (Three Men oj
Gotham)

322
The mountain sheep' are sweeter (The War Song
of Dinas Vawr)

320
PHILIPS, AMBROSE (1675' ?–1749)

Timely blossom, Infant fair (To Charlotte Pulteney) 113
POPE, ALEXANDER (1688-1744)

Happy the man, whose wish and care (The Quiet
Life)

110
PRIOR, MATTHEW (1664-1721)
The merchant, to secure his treasure .

130
ROGERS, SAMUEL (1763-1855).
Mine be a cot beside the hill (A Wish)

143
Sleep on,

and dream of Heaven awhile (The Sleep-
ing Beauty)

129
ROSSETTI, CHRISTINA GEORGINA (1830–1894)

Does the road wind up-hill all the way (Up-hill) 451
My heart is like a singing bird (A Birthday)

452
O Earth, lie heavily upon her eyes (Rest)

450
Oh roses for the flush of youth (Song)

452
Remember me when I am gone away (Remember) 451
When I am dead, my dearest (Song).

450
ROSSETTI, DANTE GABRIEL (1828–1882)

The blesséd damozel leaned out (The Blessed
Damozel)

446
SCOTT, SIR WALTER (1771-1832)
Ah! County Guy, the hour is nigh (A Serenade)

186
A weary lot is thine, fair maid (The Rover)

194
He is gone on the mountain (Coronach)

235
O Brignall banks are wild and fair (The Oritlaw) 174
O listen, listen, ladies gay (Rosabelle)

236
o lovers' eyes are sharp to see (The Maid of Neid-

196
Pibroch of Donuil Dhu (Gathering Song of Donală
the Black)

202
Proud Maisie is in the wood (The Pride of Youth) 229

.

7

Tired with all these, for restful death

PAGE
The sun upon the lake is low (Datur Hora Quieti) 274
Thy hue, dear pledge, is pure and bright (To a
Lock of Hair)

87
Waken, lords and ladies gay (Hunting Song)

241
Where shall the lover rest

191
“Why weep ye by the tide, ladie' (Jock o' Hazeldean) 183
SEDLEY, SIR CHARLES (1639' ?-1701)

Ah, Chloris! that now could sit (Child and
Maiden)

71
Not, Celia, that I juster am

81
SEWELL, GEORGE --1726)

Why, Damon, with the forward day (The Dying
Man in his Garden)

166
SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM (1564-1616)

Being your slave, what should I do but tend

(Absence)
Blow, blow, thou winter wind

26
Come aray, come away, Death (Dirge of Love) 27
Crabbéd Age and Youth (A Madrigal)

5
Farewell I thou art too

dear for my possessing 19
Fear no more the heat o' the sun (Fidele)

28
Full fathom five thy father lies (A Sea Dirge), 29
How like a winter hath my absence been
If thou survive my well-contented day (Post
Mortem)

29
It was a lover and his lass

6
Let me not to the marriage of true minds (True
Love)

15
Like as the waves 'make towards the pebbled
shore (Revolutions)

19
No longer mourn for me when I am dead (The
Triumph of Death),

30
o me! what eyes hath love put in my head (Blind
Love)

24
o Mistress mine, where are you roaming (Carpe
Diem).

17
on a day, alack the day (Love's Perjuries):

13
O never say that I was false of heart (The Un.

changeable)
Poor Soul, the centre of my sinful earth (Soul and

38
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day (to his
Love)

12
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nór boundless

sea (Time and Love)
Take, 7 take those lips away (Madrigal)

23
Tell me where is Fancy bred (Madrigal)

30
That time of year thou may'st in me behold

18
They that have power to hurt, and will do none
The

20

cry (The
World's Way)

41
To me, fair Friend, you never can be old :
Under the greenwood tree
When I have seen by Time's fell hånd defaced

(Time and Love)

9

3

9
5

3

PAGE
When icicles hang by the wall (Winter),

17
When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes (À
Consolation)

8
When in the chronicle of wasted time (To his Love) 13
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought (Re-
membrance)

18
SHELLEY, PERCY BYSSHE (1792–1822)

Ariel to Miranda :- Take (To a Lady, with a Guitar) 257
Art thou pale for weariness (To the Moon)

275
A widow bird sate mourning for her love

275
Best and brightest, come away (The Invitation) 269
Hail to thee, blithe Spirit (To a Skylark)

243
I arise from dreams of thee (Lines to an Indian
Air)

176
I dream'à that as I wander'd' by the way (Å
Dream of the Unknown)

277
I fear thy kisses, gentle maiden

179
I met a traveller from an antique land (Ozymandias
of Egypt)

251
Life of Life! thy lips enkindle (ilymn to the Spirit
of Nature)

281
Many a green isle' needs must be (Written in the
Euganean Hills)

290
Music, when soft voices die

314
Now the last day of many days' (The Recollection) 270
On a poet's lips I slept (The Poet's Dream)

300
One word is too often profaned

201
O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being
(Ode to the West Wind)

295
o World ! o Life !o Time ! (A Lament) : 308
Rarely, rarely, comest thou (Invocation)

225
Swiftly walk over the western wave (To the Night) 188
The fountains mingle with the river (Love's Philo-
sophy)

185
The sun is warm, the sky is clear (Stanzas written
in dejection near Naples)

227
When the lamp is shattered (The Flight of Love): 195
SHIRLEY, JAMES (1596-1666)

The glories of our blood and state (Death the
Leveller)

61
Victorious men of earth, no more (The Last
Conqueror)

61
SIDNEY, SIR PHILIP (1554-1586)

My true-love hath my heart, and I have his (A
Ditty)

16
SMITH, ALEXANDER (1830–1867)
On the Sabbath-day (Barbara)

453
SOUTHEY, ROBERT (1774-1843)
It was a summer evening (After Blenheim)

213
My days among the Dead are past

(The Scholar) : 228
SPENSER, EDMUND (1552 ?-1599)

Calm was the day, and through the trembling air
(Prothalamion)

32
SUCKLING, SIR JOHN (1609-1642)

Why so pale and wan, fond lóver (Encouragements
to a Lover)

83

PAGB

466

SWINBURNE, ALGERNON CHARLES (1837-1909)

Here, where the world is quiet (The Garden of

Proserpine)
In a coign of the cliff between lowland and highland

(A Forsaken Garden)
Swallow, my sister, O sister swallow (Itylus)

Who may praise her (Olive)
SYLVESTER, TOSHUA (1563-1618)

Were I as base as is the lowly plain (Love's Omni-

presence)

469
464
471

16

TENNYSON, ALFRED, LORD (1809-1892)
As thro' the land at eve we went

362
Break, break, break

360
Come down, o maid, from yonder mountain
height

365
Come into the garden, Maid

367
Deep on the convent-roof the snows (St. Agnes:

357
I come from haunts of coot and hern (The Brook) 361
In Love, if Love be Love, if Love be ours

369
It is the miller's daughter' (The Miller's Daughter) 356
My good blade carves the casques of men (Sir
Galahad)

358
Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white 365
O Swallow, Swallow, flying, flying South

364
Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky (In Memoriami 366
Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean 363
The splendour falls on castle walls

363
THOMSON, JAMES (1700-1748)
For ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove

130
When Britain first at Heaven's command '(Rule,
Britannia)

114
THOMSON, JAMES (1834–1882)
As we rush, as we rush in the train

464
TONY, THE SHEPHERD (? ANTHONY MUNDAY: 1553
1633)

Beauty sat bathing by a spring (Colin)

12

65

VAUGHAN, HENRY (1622–1695)

Happy those early days, when I (The Retreat)
VERE, EDWARD, EARL OF OXFORD (1550-1604)

If women could be fair, and yet not fond ( A Re-

nunciation)

26

76
79

WALLER, EDMUND (1606-1687)

Go, lovely Rose

That which her slender waist confined ion a Girdlej
WEBSTER, JOHN (1580 1-1625)

Call for the robin-redbreast and the wren (A Land

Dirge).
WHITMAN, WALT (i819–1892)

O Captain ! my Captain ! our fearful trip is done
WITHER, GEORGE (1588-1667)

Shall I, wasting in despair (The Manly Heart)

29

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406

85

PAGE

Beneath these fruit-tree boughs that shed (The

WOLFE, CHARLES (1791-1823)

Not a drum was heard, 'not a funeral note (The
Burial of Sir John Moore)

216
WORDSWORTH, WILLIAM (1770-1850)

A flock of sheep that leisurely pass by (To Sleep) 275
And is this-Yarrow |--This the Stream (Yarrow
Visited)

266
A slumber did my spirit seal

181
At the corner of Wood Street, when dayugat
appears (The Reverie of Poor Susan)

256
Behold her, single in the field (The Reaper)

255
Green Linnet)

246
Degenerate Douglas i 'o the unworthy lord (Com-

posed at Neidpath Castle, the property of Lord
Queensberry, 1803)

252
Earth has not anything to show more fair (Upon
Westminster Bridge)

250
Ethereal minstrel pilgrim 'of the sky (To the
Skylark)

242
From Stirling Castle we had seen (Yarroio Un:
visited)

264
I heard a thousand blended notes (Written in Early
Spring)

282
In the sweet shire of Cardigan (Simon 'Lee the old
Huntsman)

217
It is a beauteous evening, calm and free (By the
Sea)

273
I travell'd among unknown men!

180
I wandered lonely as a cloud (The Daffodils) 259
I was thy neighbour once, thou rugged Pile (Nature

298
Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour,
(London, 1802)

211
Most sweet it is with unuplifted eyes (The Inner

278
My heart leaps up when I behoid

308
o blithe new-comer ! I have heard (To the Cuckoo) 247
O Friend! I know not which way I must look
(London, 1802)

210
Once did she hold the gorgeous East in fee ion the
Extinction of the Venetian Republic)

210
She dwelt among the untrodden ways (The Lost
Love)

179
She was a phantom of delight

178
Stern Daughter of the Voice of God (Ode to Duty) 207
Surprised by joy-impatient as the wind (De-
sideria)

198
Sweet Highland Girl, a very shower (To the High-
land Girl of Inversneyde).

253
Tax not the royal Saint with vain expense (Within
King's College Chapel, Cambridge)

301
There is a flower, the Lesser Celandine (A Lessonj 222
There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream
(Ode on Intimations of Immortality)

309
The world is too much with us; late and soon 300

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