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CONSTITUTION OF THE ALLIANCE,

I.-This Association shall be denominated “THE UNITED KINGDOM ALLIANCE."

II.—The object of the Alliance shall be to call forth and direct an enlightened Public Opinion to procure the Total and Immediate Legislative Suppression of the Traffic in all Intoxicating Liquors as Beverages.

III.-All persons approving of its object, and contributing annually to its funds, shall be deemed Members of the Alliance.

IV.-The Alliance shall be under the direction of a President, VicePresidents, General Council, and Executive Committee.

V.-The General Council shall be augmented to any extent and in any manner the Executive Committee may direct. The President, VicePresidents, and Executive Committee shall be elected at the Meeting of the General Council, to be held in the month of October in each year. The Executive Committee shall consist of Members of the General Council, and shall meet as often as it may be deemed expedient, to adopt and carry out all advisable means for promoting the object of the Alliance.

VI.-Members of the General Council, as such, shall not be held liable for any debts contracted on behalf of the Alliance; and no funds of the Association shall be disbursed, nor any liability incurred, except under a minute of the Executive Committee.

VII.—The Alliance, basing its proceedings on broad and catholic grounds, shall, at all times, recognize its ultimate dependence for success on the blessing of ALMIGHTY GOD.

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Contents.

8

28

1. THAT IT IS WRONG AND IMPOLITIC FOR A STATE TO SANCTION, 08

LICENCE, INJURIOUS TRADES OR INSTITUTIONS.
Section.

Page.

1. Government a necessity of Human Nature as it is......

2. Theories of Law. Bentham's principles of Legislation... 2

8. Pearl Andrews' Doctrine of the Sovereignty of the Individual.

4. Extreme views of Social Stattics' refuted.-Arnoid

5. Humboldt's Theory of Government and the “ Westminster” 12

II. That THE TRAFFIC IN INTOXICATING LIQUOR 18 Anti-Social,

AND OUGHT THEREFORE TO BE PROHIBITED.

6. The object and duty of a State succinctly stated

18

7. The Report of the British Parliament of 1834

19

8. Report from the Senate of New York. Judge Capron

20

9. Necessities over-ride abstract theories. Humboldt's concession 22

10. Temptation not the promoter of social Virtue...

23

11. The right of Protection against the Traffic asserted

24

III. THAT ALL PAST LEGISLATION, BASED ON THE PRINCIPLE OF REGU-
LATING, INSTEAD OF SUPPRESSING, THE TRAFFIC, 18 UNSATISFACTORY.

I. The Liquor Traffic essentially mischievous.

12. The agency of mischief in the quality of the Drink

26

13. Evil to the Publican himself, physically and morally.

28

11. Admissions of Free-traders as to peculiarity of the Traffic

15. Difference shown in results, as compared with eating-bouses. 30

16. History and Sociology evince the immorality of the Traffic 31

17. Its evils on the Continent.-In ITALY as in BRITAIN... 31

18. Source of Crime in SWITZERLAND and FRANCE

32

19. Workings of the Traffic in HOLLAND and in BELGIUM

36

20. Evils of the Traffic in educated GERMANY.-Russia,

37

21. The fountain of robbery, brigandism, and murder in SPAIN. 38

22. Its melancholy effects in religious SWEDEN...

39

23. Inferences. Restrictive Legislation, ineffectual

40

24. Facilities of getting drink, everywhere promote drinking 40

25. The Crimean Army and Florence Nightingale

43

26. Admissions of the Publicans that the trade is corrupting 44

27. Concession of the Licensed Victuallers' Protection Society 48

28. The Parliamentary Committee of 1853. Mr Danson ... 49

29. Alderman Wire describes the Traffic as a dangerous Institution 50

30. Proposition proved from the effects of partial Sunday-closing. 51

31. Evidence from the analysis of a Brewster Session

53

32. National Document presented by the Scotch Church...

55

33. “ Absence of Public houses the absence of Drunkendess” 56

34. “ Presence of Public houses the presence of Drinking” 56

35. “ Increase of Public houses followed by Drinking”

57

36. “ Decrease of Public bouses followed by Sobriety."

59

37. Summary of the Evidence in the words of the Report

61

II. Legislative History of the Liquor Traffic.

38. History and results of the Traffic in SCOTLAND

62

39. History and results of the Traffic in IRELAND..

67

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Section,

Page.

40. A Prohibitory Law in 1556. Growing evils

68

41. The debauching effects of the Traffic upon the people

72

42. Protest against it, made by the people of Dublin, in 1788 72

43. Sunday Profligacy in that city

73

44. The Potency of Probibition. Distilleries stopped.

74

45. IRELAND contrasted with Wales..

75

46. History of the Liquor Traffic in ENGLAND

75

47. Original Purpose of Victualling Houses. Early abuse. 76

48. The Lord Keeper Coventry describes Alehouses as “Pests' 78

49. Things grow worse. French Wines prime for French Brandy 78

50. Distillation encouraged, which led to intolerable drunkenness 79

5). Having first debauched the people, government Prohibits ! 80

52. Memorable debates in the Lords, on the Gin Act, in 1743.. 81

53. Parliament (1750) falls back from encouragement to restriction

86

54. The effect good, but partial, and therefore unsatisfactory.... 87

55. Result of the reduction of Gin Duties, 1826–1830

87

56. Later Attempts at "regulation.!--The Wilson Patten Act, 1854. 88

57. The Beershop Act. Attempts to amend the unmendable.... 90

58. Admitted failure of regulation. Committee of 1834

92

59. Lord Harrowby's Committee and Report on the Beer Bill.. 93

60. Testimony of Chancellor Raikes. Bradford Beersellers. 94

61. Report of the Select Committee on Public-houses, 1853-4.... 95

62. Inference.—The Traffic condemned at the Bar of History.. 97

IV. THAT THE TRAFFIC IS INDEFENSIBLE, EITHER

OF GAIN OR NATIONAL REVENUE.

63. Intemperance admitted to be the greatest earthly curse'... 99

64. Witnesses to the tendency and character of the Traffic.. 100

65. Most of all a curse to the Publican himself....

106

66. The 'Benefit of-Trade' fallacy. Wilberforce's declaration.. 107

67. Impolicy of raising Revenue by the ruin of Industry.. 108

68. How Gin-drinking impoverished the people in 1732.

109

69. Results of stopping the Distilleries in 1757...

109

70. Distilleries stopt in 1796. Evidence of Mr Colquhoun 112

71. Startling paradox. Effect of stopping Irish Distilleries 113

72. What will become of the Revenue ?

Answered....

113

73. S. G. O. on the public cost and evils of Ale houses

117

V. THAT THE PROHIBITION OF THE TRAFFIC IS COMPATIBLE WITH JUST

LIBERTY AND LEGITIMATE COMMERCE.

74. The Times on the boozy birth-right of Britons'.

118

75. The theory examined, and over-ruled by Utility' and 'Right' 119

76. The Times fails to grapple with the sinews of the argument.. 120

77. Country Justice's Justice summarily disposed of

120

78. The right of interference, the right of efficiency

121

79. The Times on “Moral-suasion' Will see only half the truth.. 121

80. Necessitas non habet Legem. Various Examples.

122

81. The Traffic promotes the spread of pestilence. A nuisance 123

82. The Traffic destroys the Food of the Nation

125

83. Half-a-million persons sacrificed to the Traffic in 1847-8..

127

84. Morning Advertiser on the criminality of destroying grain 128

85. Judge Blackstone on our duty to correct Intemperance.... 130

86. Bentham, in reply to · Rights' and 'Sphere of Government'cry. 131

Section.

Page.

87. Licence involves the principle of Prohibition

182

88. Interests of Commerce promoted by Anti-Liquor Laws..... 133

VI. THAT THE SUPPRESSION OF THE TRAFFIO WOULD POWERFULLY

PROMOTE CIVILIZATION.

89. Man, a progressive being, capable of indefinite culture ...... 135

90. Civilization defined. The Traffic necessarily antagonistic to it. 136

91. The Philosophy of the Fact. •North British Review

137

92. Rough Cost of the Traffic to the Nation. Its Fruits.. 138

93. DRUNKENNESS. Its degrees. “Disguised in the

higher classes' 139

94. Habits of the trading classes. History of H. R....... 142

95. Incalculable extent of Drunkenness. Police returns defective 144

96. Sale and signs suggest use, and use creates demand for drink 147

97. POVERTY. Considered as Individual and National

150

98. Illustrations from the History of IBELAND ...

150

99. Pauperism, etc., in Scotland. Maine-Law Parishes

152

100. Poverty and Pauperism create the Traffic in England

155

101. Mendicity. Expenditure of Working Classes at Public-houses 156

102. IGNORANCE. Brutality and Vice in its train

169

103. Relation of the Traffic to Ragged Schools

160

104. How the Traffic blights the fruits of Education

105. Contrast between the Factory Girls of Lowell and Manchester 164

106. PROSTITUTION. The Traffic its Nurse and Feeder

165

107. Excitement, the proximate cause of Seduction

173

108. Drink and the Traffic necessary to sustain Prostitution. 174

109. Drunken Parents and the Traffic supply the victims........ 175

110. The consequences of the Vice.--Its true remedy

175

111, ACCIDENTS. Explosions, conflagrations, shipwrecks, etc.... 176

112. Evidence of Coroners. Doctrine of Mr Wakley, M.P.

113. DỊSEASE. Loss by chronic or permanent causes of disease.. 180

114. Loss by sudden death, and predisposition to Epidemics, etc.. 183

115. Idiocy. Hereditary transmission of imbecility

187

116. Self-inflicted Idiocy; Dementia. Society an abettor.. 188

117. MADNESS. Chronic and Temporary. (Excitement)

188

118. Melancholy and Suicide. Analysis of Causes.....

190

119. OFFENCES AND CRIMES. Statistical fallacies..

192

120. Facts and Statistics from the History of IRELAND

193

121. Scotland. Decrease of offences under partial Probibition 200

122. English Statistics (see also g 165)

200

123. Evidence of the Press. Police Courts in the Provinces 202

124. Fruits of the London Traffic. Remedies of able Editors' .. 207

125. Morning Post on Criminal Drunkenness. The Dispatch .... 209

126. Testimony of Statesmen. Shaftesbury, Aberdeen, Albemarle.. 211

127. Evidence of the Parliamentary Report of 1853

213

128. Testimony of Chaplains of Prisons. Rev. John Clay cited .. 215

129. Evidence of Prisoners themselves, as to the cause of crime.. 216

130. Testimony of Inspectors and Governors of Prisons

217

131. Evidence of Magistrates and Grand Furies

218

132. Testimony of Sheriffs aud Recorders......

220

133. Evidence of an Assize Calendar......

221

131. Testimony of the Judges of Assizes ; from Coventry to Talfourd 222

135. Testimony of the Colonial Judges. Stephens and A'Beckett.. 228

136. A Question

229

AMERICA, AND THE EXPERIMENTS OF A PROHIBITORY LAW, ILLUS-

TRATE AND CONFIRM THE POSITIONS OF THE ALLIANCE.

1. The History of the Maine Law in the United States.

Section.

Page.

187. Britain and American difference of character and circumstance 231

1. The confused perception of the Evil. Prohibition in 1676 232

2. Attempts at regulating the Machinery of Mischief.. 234

3. Era of vague Temperance. Reasons of the failure.. 235

4. The Era of Total Abstinence. The Impediment.

237

5. The Political Era. No-Licence Agitation. Great success 238

8. Epoch of Prohibitive State Law. MAINE (1).

247

188 Portland Riot. Mr Dow vindicated from the British Silenus.. 253

139 Description of the various factions opposed to the law

256

140 Consequences. (2) MINNESOTA; (3) RHODE ISLAND...... 157

141 (4) MASSACHUSETTS; (5) VERMONT; (6) MICHIGAN.. 259

142 Progress in New York, Connecticut, Ohio, Wisconsin, etc. 262

143 CONNECTICUT (7); INDIANA (8); DELAWARE (9); Iowa (10);

NEBRASKA (11)...

263

144 The great triumph in New YORK (12). Copiah

256

145 Difficulties. Legal impediments. Official obstacles ..

267

146 New HAMPSHIRE (13) completing the New England States.. 268

147 Decision of the New York Court of Appeal. Fatal sequel ! 268

II. Figures and Facts illustrating the social results of the Law.

148 Vast diminution of Crime in New York State, etc.

274

149 Workings of the Law in Portland and other towns of Maine 275

150 In MASSACHUSETTS. Gaolers injured by the Law

279

151 IN CONNECTICUT. Gaols to Let!

280

152 RHODE ISLAND. Testimony of the Secretary of State. 283

153 IO VERMONT. Evidence of Grand Juries

288

154 In New HAMPSHIRE, INDIANA, Iowa, etc.

284

III. Antiquity of Prohibition. Demand for it in the Colonies.

155 Oriental Prohibitory Laws. Modern examples

285

156 Agitation in Canada. Partially achieved for districts.

286

157 Proceedings in Nova Scotia. The law popular.

287

158 The prohibitory principle in New BRUNSWICK..

287

VIII. THAT ALL GOOD CITIZENS SHOULD COMBINE TO PROCURE AN ENACT-

MENT PROHIBITING THE SALE OF INTOXICATING BEVERAGES, AS AFFORD-

ING MOST EFFICIENT AID IN REMOVING THE EVILS OF INTEMPERANCE.

159 The evil of Intemperance and the Traffic, vast and inveterate 290

160 History and experience uniform and coincident

292

161 The practical test. Convenience or Patriotism?

294

162 Appeal to Electors. The Traffic a conspiracy

295

103 The Publican polluted by the Traffio

297

164 Interest of the useful Tradesman opposed to the traffic 298

165 The Working Classes. Their duty and destiny involved 299

166 Hints to Philanthropists. Statistical disclosures

302

167 Duty and Responsibility of Mayistrates

305

168 Policy of the Temperance party. A lesson from the past 307

169 A few words to Women

308

170 The obligations of Christian Ministers

311

171 The Traffic: Household, State, and Church,

312

172 National Cost and Loss of the Traffic outlined

313

173 Final appeal to British Virtue and Patriotism

316

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