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And with a skreen of silk both flow'rs divide :
They had suck'd lite from thence, and from her

heat
Borrow'd a soul to make themselves compleat.

O happy pillow! Though thou art layd even With dust, she made thee up almost a heaven. Her breath rain'd spices, and each amber ring Of her bright locks strew'd bracelets o'r thy

spring That carth's not poor, did such a treasure hold, But thrice inricb'd, with amber, spice and gold.

(pp. 21-2.)

а

3. CAMPIAN AND IIIS LADY-LOVE.
HIEN to her lute Corinna sings,

Her voice inlives the leaden strings :

But when of sorrows she doth speak
Even with her sighes the strings doe break.
And as her lute doth live or die,
Led by her passions : so doe I. (p. 87).

VII. From “AULA LUCIS.” (1652).
7 ELIX qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas,

Atque metus omnes, et inexorabile datum
Subjecit pedibus, strepitumque Acherontis

avari

Illum non populi fasces, non purpura regum
Flectit et infidos agitans discordia fratres;
Non res Romanæ, perituraque regna : neque illi
Aut doluit miserans inopem aut invidit habenti.

(ad. fin.)

:

VIII. AMICISSIMO SUO, ET IN OMNI PHIL-
OSOPHIA OCULATISSIMO, T. P. IN

ELEMENTA SUA OPTICA.'
UM nimis amotos picto cum syrmate

cælos,

Hortosque pensiles colo;
Stat gēmata astris nox nigra: ut maura lapillis

Induta divitis sali.
Ipse coloratæ volvo miracula scænæ,

Mundique labiles Pharos.
Sic Fati rimamur opes, cursumque procacem,

Qui nostros atterit dies.
Demens ambitio ! curtique superbia sensus !

Frænare syderum choros !

See pp. 168-9 for IIenry Vaughan's similar Verses, and Translation. Both were prefixed to the following: “Elementa Opticæ, novâ facili et compendiosâ methodo explicata. Cum Schematibus aliquot (ad pleniorem elucid. ationem) in calce annexis. Londini 1651.". (40.)

Dirige me, qui tanta potes : cælestia nolunt

Terreno dirigi duce.
Fælix, qui propriis erorrem abstergit ocellis,

Et cælos instruit suos.
Astra habeo cognata mihi, lucemque vagantem,

Quam docta corrigat manus.
Quippe facem crasso Natura in corpore clausit,

Suæque consulit domi.
Sol et luna oculi mihi sunt: solique renides

Poelle, phosporus novus.
Claude tuas Aurora fores : mihi prævius alter,

Nec radiis Lucifer tuis.
Hic notis oculis, claroque propinquior igne,

Amata nascitur Venus.

Eugenius Philalethes.

TRANSLATION.

TO THE BELOVED AND IN ALL PHILOSO.

PHY MOST SKILLED, T[HOMAS] P[OW-
ELL] ON HIS ELEMENTS OF OPTICS : A
TRANSLATION BY THE REV. J. H.
CLARK, M.A., WEST DEREHAM, NOR-
FOLK.

HEN on heaven's sparkling train, her

whirling maze
And pensile groves, I gaze,

Dark Night, star-gemm'd before me seems to

sweep Like some swart Queen be-jewell'd from the

deep.

Witli awe I view the shifting scenes, where more

Those beacon-lights above, And there, methinks, we strive to trace the ways

Of Fate-the vain pursuits that wear our days !

O mad Ambition, and short-sighted Pride

That heaven's own hosts would guide! Direct me Thou Who can’st: supernal powers

Must needs disdain all leadership of ours.

Happy who can his own eyes keep from blight,

And guide his course aright : Kind stars I hare, and light, which tho' too prone

To wander, still a guiding Hand doth own.

A torch we have, and He Who placed it there

Will of His own take care :
Mine eyes the sun and moon are, and the sun,

Thou Powell— a new Phosphor--dost fore-run.

Close then thy gates, Aurora, for to me

Unlit by rays from thee, Has risen another Lucifer; and here

A brighter, lovelier Venus doth appear.

IX. FROM "THE CITYMIST'S KEY."

(1657.) “ To this purpose Chymistry serves : for by the help of this art, we know how to digest, to dissolve, to putrifie, to separate the impure from the pure, and so to come by most perfect mcdicines. And verily so great and precious a blessing it is that God never imparts it to any fraudulent mountebanks, nor to tyrants, nor to any impure, lascivious persons, nor to the effeminate and idle, nor to gluttons, nor usurers, nor to any worshippers of Mammon : but in all ages, the pious, the indefatigable spirit, who was a diligent observer and admirer of His marvellous works, found it out. This truth is elegantly sung and expressly taught by, that famous philosopher and poet, the excellent Augurellius.

HE greedy cheat with impure hands may

not,

Attempt this art, nor is it ever got By the unlearn’d and rude: the vitious mind To lust and softnesse given, it strikes stark blind : So the slye, wandring factour, &c.

And shortly after :

But the sage, pious man, who stil adores,
And loves his Maker, and His love implores,

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