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The Ninth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Early, Calhoun and Baker.

The Tenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Dougherty, Lee, Worth and Turner.

The Eleventh Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Clay, Randolph and Terrell.

The Twelfth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Stewart, Webster and Quitman.

The Thirteenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Sumter. Schley and Macon.

The Fourteenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Dooly, Wilcox, Pulaski, Crisp and Bleckley.

The Fifteenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Montgomery, Telfair, Irwin, Dodge, Ben Hill and Wheeler.

The Sixteenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Laurens, Emanuel and Johnson.

The Seventeenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Sereven, Bulloch, Burke, Jenkins and Candler.

The Eighteenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Richmond, Glascock and Jefferson.

The Nineteenth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Taliaferro, Greene and Warren,

The Twentieth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Baldwin, Hancock and Washington.

The Twenty-first Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Twiggs, Wilkinson and Jones.

The Twenty-second Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Bibb, Monroe and Pike.

The Twenty-third Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Houston, Crawford and Taylor.

The Twenty-fourth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Muscogee, Marion and Chattahoochee.

The Twenty-fifth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Harris, Upson and Talbot.

The Twenty-sixth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Spalding, Butts and Fayette.

The Twenty-seventh Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Newton, Walton, Oconee and Rockdale.

The Twenty-eighth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Jasper, Putnam and Morgan.

The Twenty-ninth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Wilkes, Columbia, Lincoln and McDuffie.

The Thirtieth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Oglethorpe, Madison, Elbert and Clarke.

The Thirty-first Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Hart, Habersham, Franklin and Stephens.

The Thirty-second Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of White, Dawson and Lumpkin.

The Thirty-third Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Hall, Banks, Jackson and Barrow.

The Thirty-fourth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Gwinnett, DeKalb and Henry.

The Thirty-fifth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Clayton, Cobb and Fulton.

The Thirty-sixth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Campbell, Coweta, Meriwether and Douglas.

The Thirty-seventh Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Carroll, Heard and Troup.

The Thirty-eighth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Haralson, Polk and Paulding.

The Thirty-ninth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Milton, Cherokee and Forsyth.

The Fortieth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Union. Towns and Rabun.

The Forty-first Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Pickens, Fannin and Gilmer.

The Forty-second Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Bartow, Floyd and Chattooga.

The Forty-third Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Murray. Gordon and Whitfield.

The Forty-fourth Senatorial District shall be composed of the counties of Walker, Dade and Catoosa.

PAR. II. The General Assembly may change these districts after each census of the United States: Provided, that neither the number of districts nor the number of Senators from each district shall be increased.

SECTION III.

PARAGRAPH I. The House of Representatives shall consist of not more than 189 representatives apportioned among the several counties as follows, to-wit: To the six counties having the largest population, viz.: Fulton, Chatham, Richmond, Bibb, Floyd and Muscogee, three representatives each; to the twenty-six counties having the next largest population, viz.: Laurens. Carroll, Jackson, Sumter, Thomas, Decatur, Gwinnett, Coweta, Cobb, Washington. DeKalb, Burke, Bulloch, Troup, Hall, Walton, Bartow, Meriwether. Emanuel, Lowndes, Elbert, Brooks, Houston, Wilkes, Clarke and Ware, two representatives each; and to the remaining counties one representative each: and in the event of the ratification of this amendment to the Constitution the counties of Bleckley and Wheeler shall be entitled to representation in the General Assembly of Georgia for the session of 1915-16; and in the event this amendment and the amendments creating the counties of Barrow, Candler and Bacon shall be ratified then the three said last named counties shall also be entitled to representation in the session of the General Assembly for the years 1915-16; and elections in said counties shall be held on the first Tuesday in January, 1915, under the law now governing similar elections for the election of members of the General Assembly to serve during the session of 1915-16 in accordance with this amendment.2

PAR. II. The above apportionment shall be changed by the General Assembly at its first session after each census taken by the United States government, so as to give the six counties having the largest population three representatives each; and to the twenty-six counties having the next largest population two representatives each; but in no event shall the aggregate number of representatives be increased. '

"Paragraph 1 has been amended three times; the first amendment was proposed by the general assembly of 1904 and ratified on Oct. 5, 1904; the second amendment was proposed by the general assembly of 1908 and ratified on October 7, 1908; the present amendment was proposed by the general assembly of 1914 and ratified on Nov. 3, 1914. The text of the amendment of 1904 is as follows: Paragraph 1. The House of Representatives shall consist of not more than (483) one hundred and eighty-three Representatives, apportioned among the several counties as follows, to-wit: To the six counties having the largest population, viz.: Chatham. Bibb. Floyd, Fulton, Richmond and Thomas, three (3) Representatives each; to the twenty-six counties having the next largest population, viz.: Bartow, Bulloch, Burke, Cobb, Carroll, Coweta, DeKalb, Decatur, Dooly, Elbert, Emanuel, ́ Gwinnett, Hall. Houston, Jackson, Laurens, Lowndes, Meriwether, Monroe, Muscogee, Sumter, Tattnall, Troup, Walton. Washington and Wilkes, two (2) Representatives each; and to the remaining counties one Representative each. The text of the amendment o 1908 is as follows: Paragraph 1. The House of Representatives shall consist of not more than 184 Representatives, apportioned among the several counties follows, to-wit: To the six counties having the largest population, viz., Chatham. Bibb, Floyd, Fulton, Richmond and Thomas. three Representatives each; to the twenty-six counties having the next largest population, viz., Bartow, Bulloch, Burke, Cobb, Carroll. Coweta, DeKalb, Decatur, Dooly, Elbert, Emanuel, Gwinnett. Hall, Houston, Jackson, Laurens, Lowndes, Meriwether, Monroe, Muscogee, Sumter, Tatnall Troup. Walton, Washington and Wilkes, two (2) Representatives each, and to the remaining counties, one Representative each,

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SECTION IV.

PARAGRAPH I. The members of the General Assembly shall be elected for two years and shall serve until the time fixed by law for the convening of the next General Assembly. The provisions of this Paragraph, Section and Article shall apply to the term of the members of the General Assembly who were elected at the general election for members of the General Assembly in the year 1912.3

PAR. II. The first election for members of the General Assembly, under this Constitution, shall take place on the first Wednesday in December, 1877; the second election for the same shall be held on the first Wednesday in October. 1880, and subsequent elections biennially on that day, until the day of election is changed by law.

PAR. III. The first meeting of the General Assembly, after the ratification of this Constitution, shall be on the fourth Wednesday in October, 1878, and annually thereafter, on the same day, until the day shall be changed by law.

PAR. IV. A majority of each house shall constitute a quorum to transact business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day and compel the presence of its absent members, as each house may provide.

PAR. V. Each senator and representative, before taking his seat, shall take the following oath, or affirmation, to-wit: "I will support the Constitu tion of this State, and of the United States; and on all questions and measures which may come before me. I will so conduct myself as will, in my judgment. be most conducive to the interests and prosperity of this State."

PAR. VI. No session of the General Assembly shall continue longer than nifty days: Provided, that if an impeachment trial is pending at the end of ifty days, the session may be prolonged till the completion of said trial.

PAR. VII. No person holding a military commission or other appointment or office having any emolument or compensation annexed thereto, under this State. or the United States, or either of them, except justices of the peace and officers of the militia. nor any defaulter for public money or for any egal taxes required of him shall have a seat in either house; nor shall any senator or representative, after his qualification as such, be elected by the General Assembly, or appointed by the Governor, either with or without the advice and consent of the Senate, to any office or appointment having any emolument annexed thereto, during the time for which he shall have been elected.

PAR. VIII. The seat of a member of either house shall be vacated on his removal from the district or county from which he was elected.

SECTION V.

PARAGRAPH I. The senators shall be citizens of the United States, who have attained the age of twenty-five years, and who shall have been citizens of this State for four years, and for one year residents of the district from which elected.

PAR. II. The presiding officer of the Senate shall be styled the President of the Senate, and shall be elected rira roce from the senators.

PAR. III. The Senate shall have the sole power to try impeachments. PAR. IV. When sitting for that purpose, the members shall be on oath or affirmation, and shall be presided over by the Chief Justice or the Presiding Justice of the Supreme Court. Should the Chief Justice be disquali

3. 1914.

Amendment proposed by the general assembly of 1914 and ratified on Nov. *Amendment proposed by the general assembly of 1891 and ratified on Oct. 5, *X92. By the act by which this amendment was submitted to the people it is made to refer to Article 2, Section 4. Paragraph 3. The amendment has been construed 6 apply to Article 3, Section 4. Paragraph 3, where it manifestly belongs. By in act of 1902 the general assembly meets on the fourth Wednesday in June..

Amendment proposed by the general assembly of 1891 and ratified on Oct. 5. 1892. By the act by which this amendment was submitted to the people it is made to refer to Article 2. Section 4, Paragraph 6. The amendment has been construed to apply to Article 3, Section 4, Paragraph 6, where it undoubtedly belongs.

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fied, the Senate shall select the judge of the Supreme Court to preside. No person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present.

PAR. V. Judgments, in case of impeachment, shall not extend further than removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit within this State; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment, and punishment according to law.

SECTION VI.

PARAGRAPH I. The representatives shall be citizens of the United States, who have attained the age of twenty-one years, and who shall have been citizens of this State for two years, and for one year residents of the counties from which elected.

PAR. II. The presiding officer of the House of Representatives shall be styled the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and shall be elected viva voce from the body.

PAR. III. The House of Representatives shall have the sole power to impeach all persons who shall have been, or may be, in office.

SECTION VII.

PARAGRAPH I. Each house shall be the judge of the election, returns, and qualifications of its members, and shall have power to punish them for disorderly behavior, or misconduct, by censure, fine, imprisonment, or expulsion; but no member shall be expelled except by a vote of two-thirds of the house to which he belongs.

PAR. II. Each house may punish by imprisonment, not extending beyond the session, of any person, not a member, who shall be guilty of a contempt, by any disorderly behavior in its presence, or who shall rescue, or attempt to rescue, any person arrested by order of either house.

PAR. III. The members of both houses shall be free from arrest during their attendance on the General Assembly, and in going thereto or returning therefrom, except for treason, felony, larceny, or breach of the peace: and no member shall be liable to answer in any other place for anything spoken in debate in either house.

PAR. IV. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and publish it immediately after its adjournment.

PAR. V. The original journal shall be preserved, after publication, in the office of the secretary of State, but there shall be no other record thereof.

PAR. VI. The yeas and nays on any question shall, at the desire of onefifth of the members present, be entered on the journal,

PAR. VII. Every bill, before it shall pass, shall be read three times, and on three separate days, in each house, unless in cases of actual invasion or insurrection; but the first and second reading of each local bill, and bank and railroad charters, shall consist of the reading of the title only, unless said bill is ordered to be engrossed.6

PAR. VIII. No law or ordinance shall pass which refers to more than one subject-matter, or contains matter different from what is expressed in the title thereof.

PAR. IX. The general appropriation bill shall embrace nothing except appropriation fixed by previous laws, the ordinary expenses of the executive. legislative, and judicial departments of the government, payment of the public debt and interest thereon, and the support of the public institutions and educational interests of the State. All other appropriations shall be made by separate bills, each embracing but one subject.

PAR. X. All bills for raising revenue, or appropriating money shall originate in the House of Representatives, but the Senate may propose or concur in amendments, as in other bills.

PAR. XI. No money shall be drawn from the treasury except by appro-
Amendment proposed by the general assembly of 1891 and ratified on Oct.

5, 1892.

priation made by law; and a regular statement and account of the receipt and expenditure of all public money shall be published every three months, and also with the laws passed by each session of the General Assembly.

PAR. XII. No bill or resolution appropriating money shall become a law, unless upon its passage the yeas and nays, in each house, are recorded.

PAR. XIII. All acts shall be signed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives; and no bill, ordinance, or resolution, intended to have the effect of a law, which shall have been rejected by either house, shall be again proposed during the same session, under the same or any other title, without the consent of two-thirds of the house by which the same was rejected.

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PAR. XIV. No bill shall become a law unless it shall receive a majority of the votes of all the members elected to each house of the General Assembly, and it shall, in every instance, so appear on the journal.

PAR. XV. (By an act approved September 24, 1885, an amendment to the Constitution was submitted to vote of the people in October, 1886, and adopted, whereby the original of this paragraph was stricken from this Constitution.)

PAR. XVI. No local or special bill shall be passed, unless notice of the intention to apply therefor shall have been published in the locality where the matter or thing to be affected may be situated, which notice shall be given at least thirty days prior to the introduction of such bill into the General Assembly, and in the manner to be prescribed by law. The evidence of such notice having been published shall be exhibited in the General Assembly before such acts shall be passed.

PAR. XVII. No law, or section of the Code, shall be amended or repealed by mere reference to its title, or to the number of the section of the Code. but the amending or repealing act shall distinctly describe the law to be amended or repealed, as well as the alteration to be made.

PAR. XVIII. The General Assembly shall have no power to grant corporate powers and privileges to private companies, to make or change election precincts, nor to establish bridges or ferries, nor to change names of legitimate children; but it shall prescribe by law the manner in which such powers shall be exercised by the courts; it may confer this authority to grant corporate powers and privileges to private companies to the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State in vacation. All corporate powers and privileges to banking, insurance, railroad, canal, navigation, express and telegraph companies shall be issued and granted by the secretary of State in such manner as shall be prescribed by law; and if in any event the secretary of State should be disqualified to act in any case, then in that event the legislature shall provide by general laws by what person such charters shall be granted.

PAR. XIX. The General Assembly shall have no power to relieve principals or securities upon forfeited recognizances from the payment thereof, either before or after judgment thereon, unless the principal in the recognizance shall have been apprehended and placed in the custody of the proper officer.

PAR. XX. The General Assembly shall not authorize the construction of any street passenger-railway within the limits of any incorporated town or city, without the consent of the corporate authorities.

PAR. XXI. Whenever the Constitution requires a vote of two-thirds of

'Paragraph XVIII has been amended twice: the first amendment was proposed by the general assembly of 1891 and ratified on Oct. 5, 1892; the present amendment was proposed by the general assembly of 1912 and ratified on Nov. 5, 1912. The text of the amendment of 1891 is as follows: Par. XVIII. The General Assembly shall have no power to grant corporate powers and privileges to private companies, to make or change election precincts; nor to establish bridges or ferries; nor to change names of legitimate children; but it shall prescribe by law the manner in which such powers shall be exercised by the courts. All corporate powers and privileges to banking, insurance, railroad, canal, navigation, express and telegraph companies shall be issued and granted by the Secretary of State in such manner as shall be prescribed by law, and if in any event the Secretary of State should be disqualified to act in any case, then in that event the Legislature shall provide by general laws by what person such charters shall be granted.

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