Principles of Elocution

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Oliver & Boyd, 1857 - Всего страниц: 412
 

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Suavity of Manner
94
The Mountain of Miseries
100
On the Love of Nature
107
The Poor weep unheeded
113
Remarks on some of the best Poets both Ancient and Modern
119
Siege and Conquest of Jerusalem by the Crusaders
125
Field Sports and Agriculture of the Middle Ages
132
The World made with a bountiful Design
140
The Works of Creation
142
On Grieving for the Dead
148
The Encounter of Brave and the Panther
155
Dramatic Poets
161
HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL EXTRACTS
168
Character of Lord Clive
174
Character of Mary Queen of Scots
180
Maria Part I
186
Religious Knowledge a Source of Consolation
193
Prayer
200
The End of the Year
206
SPECIMENS OF MODERN ELOQUENCE
212
Arbitrary Power not given to Man
218
Extract from a Speech of Mr Canning on Parliamentary Reform
225
Extract from Charles Foxs Charge against Warren Hastings
231
Hannibal to his Soldiers
238
On Scanning
246
Slavery
252
The Immortality of the Soul
258
Hymn of the Hebrew Maid
264
Table Talk
270
Old Age and Death
276
Prologue to Cato 1713 Page
280
Character of Villiers Duke of Buckingham
281
Character of Shaftesbury
282
The Art of Criticism
283
Harmony of Expression
284
On Man
285
Universal Order
287
Conclusion of the Dunciad
288
The Treasures of the Deep
289
Address to the Nightingale
290
From the Spirits Epilogue in Comus
292
Freedom
293
The Village Preacher
294
The beautiful but still and melancholy Aspect of the once busy and glorious Shores of Greece
296
From the Traveller
297
he hath left us
298
A Ship Sinking
299
Solitude
300
Happiness the Reward of Virtue
301
Ode on the Fate of Tyranny
302
Grongar Hill
304
Despondency rebuked by Fame
318
Address to Evening
319
Perseverance
320
Forest Scenery
321
Cardinal Wolseys Speech to Cromwell
322
11 Human Life
323
Flattery unworthy of a Poet
324
Description of Adam and Eve
325
Autumn Evening Scene
327
On Death
328
Apostrophe to Night
329
Hymn on the Seasons
330
Lochiels Warning
333
Hotspur and Sir Richard Vernon from the First Part of Henry the Fourth
335
From the Play of As you Like It
336
Palemon and Arcite Captives in Greece
346
The Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius
348
Marino Faliero and Angiolina
352
Hesperus and Floribel from the Brides Tragedy
355
Hector and Andromache
356
Catos Senate
357
Speech of Henry V to his Soldiers at the Siege of Harfleur
360
Zangas Reasons for hating Alonzo
361
Marino Faliero to the Conspirators
362
Henry V s Speech at Agincourt
364
Richard II to Sir Stephen Scroop on receiving the News of the Revolt of his Subjects
365
How Douglas learned the Art of War
366
Othellos Apology 367
367
Cassius against Cæsar
368
Address of Ion
370
The Duke Aranza to Juliana from the HoneyMoon
371
Speech of Prince Edward in his Dungeon
372
Eves Address to Adam after dreaming that she had tasted of the Tree of Knowledge
373
The Passions an Ode
374
Ode for St Cecilias Day
377
Speech of Rolla
380
Virginius appealing to his FellowCitizens to rescue his Daughter from the Hands of Appius
381
Clarences Dream
382
Hamlets Advice to the Players
384
Henry the Fourths Soliloquy on Sleep
385
Catos Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul
386
Hamlets Soliloquy on Death
387
Samson Agonistes
388
COMIC EXTRACTS 1 Conclusion of Phil Fudges Letter to his Brother Tim Fudge Esq BarristeratLaw
390
Contest between the Nose and Eyes
392
The Monkey
393
Lodgings for Single Gentlemen
394
The Well of St Keyne
395
The Newcastle Apothecary
397
Justice and the Oyster
399
THE PASSIONS 400412
400

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Стр. 383 - With a bare bodkin ? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all...
Стр. 72 - But yesterday, the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world ; now lies he there, And none so poor to do him reverence. 0 masters ! if I were disposed to stir Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, 1 should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong, Who, you all know, are honorable men. I will not do them wrong ; I rather choose To wrong the dead, to wrong myself, and you, Than I will wrong such honorable men.
Стр. 381 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge ; And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deafning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes ? Canst thou, O partial sleep!
Стр. 365 - tis true, this god did shake ; His coward lips did from their colour fly, And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose his lustre : I did hear him groan : Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans Mark him and write his speeches in their books, Alas, it cried, 'Give me some drink, Titinius,
Стр. 64 - O, young Lochinvar is come out of the west, Through all the wide Border his steed was the best ; And save his good broad-sword he weapon had none, He rode all unarmed, and he rode all alone. So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war, There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.
Стр. 380 - ... twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Стр. 314 - Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights, and live laborious days ; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred shears And slits the thin-spun life.
Стр. 50 - O, you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome, knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oft have you climbed up to walls and battlements, to towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops, your infants in your arms, and there have sat the livelong day, with patient expectation, to see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome...
Стр. 363 - Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors, My very noble and approved good masters, That I have ta'en away this old man's daughter, It is most true ; true, I have married her : The very head and front of my offending Hath this extent, no more. Rude am I in my speech, And little bless'd with the soft phrase of peace ; For since these arms of mine had seven years...
Стр. 381 - O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...

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