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ODE XX.

LOVE AND MUSIC.

FOR THE ENTERTAINMENT OF THE MUSICAL CLUB IN

CAMBRIDGE, 1700.

BY SAMUEL COBB, M.A.

TO VENUS.

Come, Cytherea, from thy Paphian bower,

Bring every grace, and every smile,

To favor the Britannic isle,
And listen while we celebrate thy power.

Upon the dewy ground,
With flowery garlands crown'd,
Thy sweet Adonis lays his head,
With blushing roses round him spread,
· And opening lilies for his bed.

Hark! he calls in Music's voice :
With amorous talk the prattling strings
Resound, and thy Adonis sings,
While the loud trumpet's sprightly noise
Wakes the brisk violin, and soft flute,

And manly viol to dispute
The conquest, and with triumph gains the cause.

96

CHORUS

Come, Cytherea, come, we all agree,
That Love and Music make the world's sweet harmony.

Prolific Queen! from Heaven descend,
Mount thy gay chariot drawn by milky doves,

With all thy little troop of Loves,

Which fill thy train, thy court attend.
She comes ! she comes! prepare the glorious way

With Music, and salute the day.
Her wanton sparrows first appear,
And celebrate the new-born year.
The lark repeats her lofty song;
And, stretching out her mounting wings,
By weary steps to Heaven she springs,

And strikes it with her tongue.
While the slirill linnet tunes her silver throat,
And Philomel instructs her warbling young

With melancholy note.

Venus obeys the signal sound:

She views the sunny hills around,
And from the sky descends to bless the pregnant

ground.
The groves erect their branchy heads;
And, when new liquid life she pours,
The healing plants and fragrant flowers

Rise from their humid beds.
Numidian lions feel her gentle power;

And, soften'd into tenderness and love,
Lay down their fierceness, and forget to roar,
When o'er the bowling wilderness they rove,

To seek their tawny paramour ;
Th' untroubled ocean flows

With a serener tide;
Tritons above the waves, emergent, ride,

And each his rattling coral blows.
Come, Goddess, and exert thy reign :
At thy approach large phocae play,

Submitting to thy easy sway;
And all the scaly people of the main,

Thee, sea-born Queen, obey.

Love like a subtle poison creeps

On man, and there his empire keeps. Rise, Anthony, repair thy ruin'd fame,

And waken to a nobler flame.

The trumpet calls thee, and the drum Rattles; Octavius and the Romans coine,

To find a second Actiuni.

Lol rous'd from his deep lethargy, Horrid in steel the hero shines afar,

Like Mars, when rushing to the war :

But Venus smiles to see.
By Venus taught, th’Egyptian Queen prepares

Softer music, tender airs.
Delighted Cupids clap their wings,
And temper all the magic strings.
Dol, XVIII,

к

Down, down the melting lover lies,
Lulld in th' enchanting sorceress's arms,

He feels the witchraft of her eyes,
And true Egyptian charms.

What cannot Love and Music do?
Love sent the Thracian bard down to the shades below,
When to his lute the savages he drew,

And rapid rivers ceas'd to flow.
Thrice Eurydice he cried :

Hell thrice Eurydice replied.
Then on the steep insuperable hill

The stone of Sisyphus stood still,
And Music stopp'd the running wheel.

He sung, and play'd;
The Stygian Powers obey'd,

And from the pale infernal throng
Straight to his arms restor'd the beauteous shade,
So mighty was his love! so wondrous was his song!

ODE XXI.

TO VENUS,

A. RANT, 1732.

SET TO MUSIC BY DR. HAYES,

BY THOMAS LISLE, D.D.

RECITATIVE,

O GODDESS, most rever'd above,
Bright parent of almighty Love,
Whose power th’immortal Gods confess,

Hear and approve my fond address !
In melting softness I thy doves outvie,
Then teach me like thy swans to sing and fly;
So I thy vot'ry will for ever be;
My song, my life I'll consecrate to thee.

AIR.

Give me numbers strong and sweet,
Glowing language, pointed wit;
Words that might a Vestal move,
And melt a frozen heart to love.

Bid, bid thy blind boy
All his vigor employ ;

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