The Works of Alexander Pope: Esq. with Notes and Illustrations by Himself and Others. To which are Added, a New Life of the Author, an Estimate of His Poetical Character and Writings, and Occasional Remarks, Том 9

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Requesting him to call upon Mr L concern ing the Iliad
371
Mentioning a time for their meeting
372
Of a benefaction Dr Arbuthnots directions against the plague
373
Uneasiness concerning something reported to have been said by him at Sir R Walpoles
375
Of Dr Swift
376
Requests Mr Fortescue to procure him an es tate in Devonshire
377
Mrs Popes illness
378
Concerning his sisters affairs
379
His apprehensions on hearing of Mr Fortes cues illness
380
Letter Page XXV An account of Mrs Popes accident
381
Inviting him to meet Mr Gay
382
Requests his silence concerning the Essay on Man on Lady Marys libel upon him
383
Concerning his sisters affairs
384
Requesting him to convey a letter to Mrs Howard
385
An account of Mrs Popes illness
386
Regrets not seeing him oftener imitation of Horace
387
After visiting town 888
388
Written on the day of Mrs Popes death
390
On Mrs Blounts affairs
391
Concerning Mr Gay Lady Marys libel
392
Proposing to visit him with Mrs Blounts party
394
On Mrs Blounts affairs
395
Expressing his pleasure at returning to Twickenham
396
Concerning Mrs Blounts affairs
397
Complaining of a cold
398
Kindness of Sir R Walpole
399
Concerning the piracy of Mr Popes Works requests Mr Fortescue to send his letters to him
400
Visits of his friends
402
On Curlls affair
403
On the same occasion
404
Previous to a journey inviting Mr Fortes
409
Intention of visiting Lord Cornbury
415
ºrrºrs To MRs NEwsHAM MR AND MRs KNIGHT
423
To John Knight Esq concerning
425
To Mrs Knight Of some curiosities
443
To the same Concerning a living for
449
A LETTER TO A NOBLE LORD
459

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Стр. 230 - His figure was beautiful ; but his manner was irresistible, by either man or woman. It was by this engaging, graceful manner, that he was enabled, during all his war, to connect the various and jarring powers of the Grand Alliance, and to carry them on to the main object of the war, notwithstanding their private and separate views, jealousies, and wrongheadednesses.
Стр. 99 - I am confident it is the prettiest kind of white soul in the universe. But I forget whom I am talking to ; you may possibly by this time believe, according to the prophet, that you have none ; if so, show me that which comes next to a soul ; you may easily put it upon a poor ignorant Christian for a soul, and please him as well with it ; — I mean your heart ; — Mahomet, I think, allows you hearts ; which (together with fine eyes and other agreeable equivalents), are worth all the souls on this...
Стр. 70 - I no longer look upon Theocritus as a romantic writer ; he has only given a plain image of the way of life amongst the peasants of his country...
Стр. 225 - English stages, and it is only by a blind confidence in the reputation of Milton that a drama can be praised in which the intermediate parts have neither cause nor consequence, neither hasten nor retard the catastrophe.
Стр. 238 - I do."—" If you do, my lord, it is but lately. May I beg to know what new light or arguments have prevailed with you now, to entertain an opinion so contrary to that which you entertained of that book all the former part of your life ?"—The...
Стр. 283 - It would have been ridiculous to suppose you ignorant of it : I cannot think, you need be told, that it meant you no harm ; — and it had...
Стр. 110 - He showed where stood the triple rows of butts of sack, and where were ranged the bottles of tent for toasts in the morning.
Стр. 106 - I did not value you more than any, nay every body else there ; and you'll be convinced how little the town has engaged my affections in your absence from it, when you know what a place this is which I prefer to it ; I shall therefore describe it to you at large, as the true picture of a genuine ancient country-seat. You must expect nothing regular...
Стр. 71 - Turk is very different from what is spoke at court, or amongst the people of figure; who always mix so much Arabic and Persian in their discourse, that it may very well be called another language. And 'tis as ridiculous to make use of the expressions commonly used, in...
Стр. 103 - Such an one can't but be desperately fond of any creature that is quite different from these. If the Circassian be utterly void of such honour as these have, and such virtue as these boast of, I am content. I have detested the sound of honest woman, and loving spouse, ever since I heard the pretty name of Odaliche.

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