Folk-lore and Legends, Scotland

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Gibbings, 1889 - Всего страниц: 192
 

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Стр. 134 - ... how he came thither, he told his name, his country, and the place of his residence! and that on such a day of the month, which proved to be the day immediately preceding, being in the fields, he heard the noise of a whirlwind, and of voices, crying 'Horse and Hattock/' (this is the word which the fairies are said to use when they remove from any place), whereupon he cried 'Horse and Hattock...
Стр. 168 - A virtuous well, about whose flowery banks The nimble-footed fairies dance their rounds By the pale moonshine, dipping oftentimes Their stolen children, so to make them free From dying flesh and dull mortality.
Стр. 116 - All at once light began to glance and twinkle on board the two Haunted Ships from every hole and seam, and presently the sound as of a hatchet employed in squaring timber echoed far and wide. But if the toil of these unearthly workmen amazed the laird, how much more was his amazement increased when a sharp shrill voice called out, 'Ho! brother, what are you doing now?' A voice still shriller responded from the other haunted ship, ' I'm making a wife to Sandie Macharg...
Стр. 122 - The Brownie formed a class of beings, distinct in habit and disposition from the freakish and mischievous elves. He was meagre, shaggy, and wild in his appearance. Thus Cleland, in his satire against the Highlanders, compares them to " Faunes, or Brownies, if ye will, Or Satyres come from Atlas Hill.
Стр. 77 - Yonder right-hand path,' she says, 'conveys the spirits of the blest to paradise. Yon downward and well-worn way leads sinful souls to the place of everlasting punishment. The third road, by yonder dark brake, conducts to the milder place of pain, from which prayer and mass may release offenders. But see you yet a fourth road, sweeping along the plain to yonder splendid castle? Yonder is the road to Elfland, to which we are now bound. The lord of the castle is king of the country, and I am his queen...
Стр. 134 - ... and turn round, which motion continued, advancing till it came to the place where they were; whereupon they began to bless themselves. But one of their number (being it seems a little more bold and confident than his companions) said, horse and hattock with my top...
Стр. 114 - I'll warrant it sobered the lad's speech ; and he never reckoned himself safe till he made auld Moll the present of a new kirtle and a stone of cheese." " O father," said his granddaughter Barbara, " ye surely wrong poor old Mary Moray : what use could it be to an old woman like her, who has no wrongs to redress, no malice to work out against mankind, and nothing to seek of enjoyment save a...
Стр. 76 - ... work: her stirrups, her dress, all corresponded with her extreme beauty and the magnificence of her array. The fair huntress had her bow in hand, and her arrows at her belt. She led three greyhounds in a leash, and three raches, or hounds of scent, followed her closely.
Стр. 113 - ... it's a word that may not very well be uttered, but there are many mistakes made in evening stories if old Moll Moray there, where she lives, knows not mickle more than she is willing to tell of the Haunted Ships, and their unhallowed mariners. She lives cannilie and quietly ; no one knows how she is fed or supported ; but her dress is aye whole, her cottage ever smokes, and her table lacks neither of wine, white and red, nor of fowl and fish, and white bread and brown. It was a dear scoff to...
Стр. 166 - They followed the sound, which seemed to be the voice of a drowning person, and, to their infinite astonishment, they found that it ascended the river. Still they continued, during a long and tempestuous night, to follow the cry of the malicious sprite; and arriving, before morning's dawn, at the very sources of the river, the voice was now heard descending the opposite side of the mountain in which they arise. The fatigued and deluded travellers now relinquished the pursuit, and had no sooner done...

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