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THE BOOKSELLERS PROVIDENT

BRIEF LESSONS ON THE PARABLES AND

MIRACLES OF OUR LORD. With an Appendix on the
Names of the Apostles and 4 Maps. By W. T. LYNN, B.A. F.R.A.S.,
Associate of King's College, London.
"That praiseworthy little book."-Guardian, August 22, 1906.

London:
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: Recorded in the Holy Scriptures, arranged under their Probable Respective Dates, with a Description of the Places namest, and a Supplement on English Versions. "By W. T. LYNN, B.A. F.R.A.S. "This compendious and useful little work."

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THIRTEENTH EDITION JUST OUT, price Sixpence, cloth.

the most interesting Facts in the History of Cometary Astro Domy. By W. T. LINN, B.A. F.R.A.S.

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THE ATHENÆUM
JOURNAL OF ENGLISH AND FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE,

THE FINE ARTS, MUSIC, AND THE DRAMA.

THIS WEEK'S ATHENÆUM contains Articles on SCHOOLS OF HELLAS. QUEEN HORTENSE AND HER FRIENDS. COMPANIONS OF THE CONQUEROR.

GEORGE BUCHANAN. ESSAYS AND ADDRESSES. ALICE-FOR-SHORT. COLONEL DAVERON. ITINERANT DAUGHTERS. A WOMAN'S

WAR. LOVE AT ARMS. JANE CABLE. BACHELOR BETTY.
BOOKS ON LONDON.
THE LAND OF EVERY MAN. MY KINGDOM OF HEAVEN. ADMIRAL VERNON AND

THE NAVY. A SEA-DOG OF DEVON : LIFE OF SIR JOHN HAWKINS. A HISTORY
OF DIPLOMACY IN THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF EUROPE.
L'ÉCOSSE. LA REPENTIE. MÉMOIRES D'ANONYMES ET D'INCONNUS. POEMS

OF PATRIOTISM.
NOTES FROM OXFORD. THE OXFORD PAGEANT.
NATURE'S OWN GARDENS. THE BOOK OF ROCK AND WATER GARDENS. FLOWERS

OF THE FIELD. ROMAN BATH.

JOACHIM COMMITTEE CONCERT.

VOL.

NEXT WEEK'S ATHENÆUM will contain Reviews of
II. OF THE OXFORD TREASURY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE.

D. A. CHART'S THE STORY OF DUBLIN.

The ATHENÆUM, every SATURDAY, price TAREEPENCE, of

JOHN C. FRANCIS and J. EDWARD FRANCIS,
Athenæum Office, Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, E.C. And of all Newsagents.

LONDON, SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1907.

De Laune's book (or at least my copy of

it) has no index, so these inns are not easy CONTENTS.-No. 184.

to find under their names. The author NOTES: - London Coaching Houses in 1680, 1– - T. L.

Peacock : Contributions to Periodicals, 2-A New Light describes the chapter from which this list leigh-Hamlet as a Christian Name- The Regent's Canal, of all the Carriers, Wagoners, and Stage on the Douglas Cause--"Twopenny Tube,"3— Miss Chud. is compiled as • An Alphabetical Account Tokens in New England-Cornish Vergers : Carne Family Coaches that comes [sic] to the several Inns

- Bladum" : "Siligo,” 5- Richard Baxter on the Pied in London, Westminster, and Southwark,' Christian Martyr - Stowe House, 6–“Popular Etymo. &c., so that in all probability the following logies" of the Old Homilists—"Neither my eye,” &c. names form a tolerably complete list of QUERIES :-Sir Claude Champion Crespigny's Monument

"Lombard Street to a China Orange, 3-Duke of Well the hostelries of the metropolis in the latter lington on Unifornis--Shrewsbury Clock : " Point of war part of the reign of Charles II. The word -Gotham in Derbyshire -"Herefordshire Window".

* The” forming the prefix to the title in Musical Services on Church Towers - Archer Gordon“El Chico Terencio"-MacKeachan Proverb-Rose and every_instance except that of Gerrard's Gordon Families, 8.-Sir Henry Docwra--Lady-bird Folk. Hall, I have omitted for alphabetical conlore “Funeral" : "Burial" - Red Rose of LancasterBarringtons of Cullenagh-Church wardens' Accounts, 9

venience. Regimental Distinctions-Sir G. Monoux-Book for Many

In London.
Wives, c. 1646, 10.
REPLIÉS :-Ordinaries of Newgate-Cardinal Newman's Angel, in St. Giles; behind St. Clements.

Birthplace, 10- George Romney's House in Cavendish Axe, in Aldermanbury.
Square, 11-Houses of Historical Interest, 12-Mr. D. M. Bear and Ragged Staff, in Smithfield.
Moore New York under British Rule – Hock: Hog :
Hoga - Irish Girl and Barbary, Pirates 77 Sir Thomas *Bell Savage, on Ludgate Hill.

Bell, in Friday St.; in Aldersgate St.; in Holborn.
Bloodworth, Lord Mayor 1665-6, 13—"Woodland Mary”-
Zoffany's Indian Portraiti- Abraham Lincoln on the

Black Horse, near the Mews-Gate. Sufferings of Slaves - "Prince" Boothby, 14 - "Mare- Black Lyon, in Water Lane. boake"; " Viere" – Bunyan and Milton Genealogies- Black Swan, in Holborn. * Bat Bearaway"- Skrimshander," 15—An Early Latin- Blossoms Inn, in Lawrence Lane. English - Basque Dictionary - Lawyers' Wills – “Umbrella"-Sturmy or Esturny Family-Court Leet-"Jom

Blue Boar, in Holborn ; in Whitechapel ; without mox" : "Wudget" : "Wompus," 16-West's Picture of the

A ldgate.
Death of Wolfe-Rock of Ages' - St. Devereux - Beli * Bolt in Tun, in Fleet St.
Inscriptions at Siresa–Heralds: their Anointing – Isles Bull, in Bishopsgate; in Holborn.
Family-Butchers exempted from Juries, 17.

Bull and Mouth, by Aldersgate.
YOTES ON BOOKS :- History of London Squares.' Castle, in Smithfield ; in Wood St.
Booksellers' Catalogues,

Castle and Falcon, in Aldersgate St.

Chequer, near Charing Cross; in Holborn.
Notes.

Cock, in Aldersgate St.

Cock and Dolphin, in Gray's Inn Lane. LONDON COACHING HOUSES IN 1680.

Cross Keys, in Gracechurch St.; in Whitecross

St.; in Wood St. MANY inquiries are made from time to Crown, without Aldgate; in the Haymarket; in time as to inns in London which have existed Holborn. at various periods. In a scarce and curious

Crown and Coach and Horses, in High Holborn.

Dark House, at Billingsgate. little volume entitled 'The Present State of

Dolphin, without Bishopsgate. London,' by Thomas De Laune, published Eagle and Child, in the Strand. in 1681, there is an interesting list of inns Four Swans, in Bishopsgate. or taverns in London and Southwark at George, in Aldersgate St.; by Holborn Conduit; which carriers carts and coaches called to Gerrards Hall, in Basing Lane.

in West Smithtield; in King St., Westminster. take up goods and passengers, on different

Green Dragon, in Bishopsgate. days of the week, for all parts of the country. Greyhound, in Holborn. The vehicles are variously described as Ipswich Arms, in Cullum St. wagons, coaches, or carriers' carts, and for Katherine Wheel, without Bishopsgate. the greater distances appear to have come

King's Arms, on Holborn Bridge, in Leadenhall St.

King's Head, in Gray's Inn Lane ; in Leadenhall in on one day, and gone out on the following ; St.; in the Old Change; near Charing Cross. whilst those from adjacent towns came in and Maidenhead, in St. Giles's. left on the same day.

Mermaid, in Carter Lane. Some of the most notable houses or those

Nag's Head, without Aldgate.

Pewter Platter, in St. John's St. having curious signs are referred to by

Pewter Pot, in Leadenhall St. Mr. Philip Norman in his valuable work on

Ram, in West Smithfield. * London Signs and Inscriptions,' 1897. Ram's Head, in Fenchurch St. These I have marked with an asterisk. Red Lyon, in Aldersgate St.; in Holborn ; in Ked Most of them were in the district now known Cross St. as “the City," or just outside ; one was in

Rose, on Holborn Bridge ; in Smithfield.

Saracen's Head, in Aldgate; in Carter Lane; in Westminster; and those oi Southwark I

Friday St. have tabulated by themselves.

Spread Eagle, in Gracechurch St.

pp. 69-84.

Star, on Fish St. Hill.

other sources (the articles reproduced in Sun Dial, in Old St.

Cole's edition not being included) :Swan, in St. John's St.; near Somerset House. *Swan with Two Necks, in Lad Lane.

1822. The Poetry of Nonnus.'-London MagaTalbot, in the Strand.

zine, October, pp. 336-9. Three Cups, in Aldersgate St.; in Bread St.

1827. Article on Thomas Moore's ‘Epicurean.'— Three Nuns, without Aldgate.

Westminster Review, pp. 351-84. Unicorn, in the Hay-market.

1830. Article on Thomas Moore's 'Letters and Vine, in Bishopsgate St.; in Old St.

Journals of Lord Byron.' – Westminster Review, White Bear, in Lime Street.

April, pp. 269-304. White Hart, at Charing Cross; in High Holborn. Article on “Memoirs, Correspondence, and White Horse, in Fleet St.; without Cripplegate.

Private Papers of Thomas Jefferson, late Presi. White Swan, without Bishopsgate ; on Holborn dent of the United States.'— Westminster Review, Bridge.

October, pp: 312-35. Windmill, in Shoe Lane.

Also in the same number one on Chronicles of

London Bridge' (pp. 401-15).
In Southwark.

1834. Article on Musical Reminicences,' contain*George.

ing an account of the Italian opera in England from Greyhound.

1773, by the Earl of Mount Edgecumbe. -- London *Half Moon.

and Westminster Review, April to July, pp. 173-87. Katherine Wheel.

1835-6. Article on French Comic Romances.' King's Arms, in Barnaby St.

London and Westminster Review, July to January, King's Head. Queen's Head.

In the same number one on Bellini (pp. 467-80). Spur. Talbot.

The same number also contains an article *White Hart.

undoubtedly written by Peacock, on The White Horse.

Epicier : Physiology of the French' (pp. There is an interesting note on Gerrards 355–65), founded on a critique in the Hall in Stow’s ‘Survey,' under the heading

Revue Encyclopédique, Etudes Politiques of Bread Street Ward, and the building sur l'Epicier.' As this article has been up seems to have escaped the Great Fire. It to the present absolutely unmentioned as is also interesting to observe that most, if one of Peacock's, the reasons for its being his not all, of the streets named, exist at the may be given : (1) The subject is a congenial present day. I am not sure if Lad Lane and therefore likely one for him, and the does so ; but it did so recently as 1831, article is entirely written in his style. (2) and is described by Elmes as "" the first It has the same initials (M. S. O.) attached turning on the right in Wood Street, going to it that the two other articles in the same from Cheapside ; it extends to Milk Street.

number of the London and Westminster bear, WM. NORMAN.

and under which the 'Horæ Dramaticæ Plumstead.

appeared in Fraser's Magazine. (3) It. contains the same promise to write an

article on Paul de Kock which Peacock T. L. PEACOCK: CONTRIBUTIONS had made in two other articles in the same TO PERIODICALS.

journal, and which, although thus thrice THOMAS LOVE PEACOCK, who may be

made in its pages, he never fulfilled. said in his teaching and practice to have minster and Foreign Quarterly Review, October to

1849. Article on 'Indian Epic Poetry.' - Westbeen a bundle of inconsistencies, was

a January number. frequent contributor to the periodical lite- 1858. Article on "Chapelle and Bachaumont.'rature which he always did his best to Fraser's Magazine, April, pp. 502-11. ridicule and abuse. His activity in this

Article on · Demetrius Galanus,' Greek translarespect has been nearly overlooked, for November, pp. 596-608.

tions from the Sanskrit. Fraser's Magazine, neither have his articles been sought out 1859. Article on “Müller and Donaldson's History and collected, nor, except for a casual of Greek Literature.'— Fraser's Magazine, Mareli, remark here and there, has any notice been Pp. 357-77. taken of them. This statement naturally Finally, a long article on 'Steam Navigadoes not apply to ‘The Four Ages of Poetry,' tion' in The Edinburgh Review (1835) may “ Horæ Dramaticæ,' and Memoir and be mentioned. This was claimed for PeaLetters of Shelley,' which were reprinted in cock by the late Dr. Garnett. If the latter Cole's edition. Some of Peacock's other should be right, this article is certainly the articles are mentioned by name in a letter most glaring example that can possibly be of his addressed to a Mr. L'Estrange, and adduced for showing Peacock's inconsiscontained in Cole's 'Biographical Notes.' tency. That he should, immediately after

The following list is derived from this and his scathing remarks on The Edinburgh

Review in 'Crotchet Castle,' have con- honourably acquitted by a decree dated tributed to it, is, however, improbable ; June 25, 1773 (Archives Nationales, AD III. and it is also unlikely that the man who 13, pièce No. 40). Thus, accepting the laughed at Southey for writing the reviews decision of the French court, we must deem of his own poems would show such a want him not guilty of the charges brought against of modesty and good taste as favourably to him. Other circumstances, however, should criticize the very evidence he had himself be car ally weighed before a final verdict is just given before a private committee of pronounced. The judicature of the old the House of Commons. Since the whole régime was utterly corrupt, and it is necessary article is written in anything but Peacock's to investigate all the charges brought against style, and the references to him made in it the Comte de Morangiés before we can form so decidedly speak against the possibility a conclusion with regard to the innocence of his being the author, it would be at least of him or his associates. He was accused interesting to find out upon what grounds of extorting money under false pretences Dr. Garnett attributed it to him.

from a widow and her son, and popular A. B. YOUNG. opinion seems to have been wholly on the

side of the prosecution ; but he was an

aristocrat, and powerful influence appears A NEW LIGHT ON THE DOUGLAS to have been exerted to secure his acquittal CAUSE.

(Mémoires secrets de Bachaumont,' vi.

137-40, 142-6, 149-54, 180–81, 214, 254, IN a previous note (10 S. iv. 85) I showed 346, 365, 370, 371; vii. 21-2, 27, 32-3, 55, that the statement in Horace Walpole's 66). account of the great Douglas Cause which

Possibly, as the case forms one of the puzzled Sir Denis Le Marchant has been causes célèbres of France, it may be familiar corroborated by John Taylor, and that the to students of the period, and modern witness said to have been convicted of criticism may have dealt with it already. perjury in another cause in France

must No doubt there are numerous reports in have been the redoubtable Dr. Michel

contemporary French newspapers. I shall Menager. Since

became aware of this be obliged to any reader of ' N. & Q. who accusation I have tried to discover whether will give me information on the subject. it was justified, for, as his evidence decided Menager, of course, played a subservient the verdict in the famous Scotch law suit; part, being merely called as a witness on the fair fame of the French physician is of behalf of Morangiés ; but a full review of considerable importance. Moreover, Andrew the whole case will no doubt throw some Stuart has demonstrated in the Letters to light upon his conduct. Voltaire wrote Lord Mansfield' that the testimony, of several vigorous pamphlets on behalf of the Menager is entitled to little credit; and that accused nobleman (v. Brit. Mus. Cat.), who, he should have been proved guilty of bearing according to Bachaumont, showed" little false evidence against his neighbour at a gratitude to his champion ('Mémoires subsequent period would appear an appro- secrets,' vii. 347). HORACE BLEACKLEY. priate destiny for the man. Owing to the

Fox Oak, Hersham. kindness of Mr. van Noorden, who has hunted up the facts with his usual acuteness “ TWOPENNY TUBE.' (See 9 S. vii. 29, in the Bibliothèque Nationale and the 116, 218, 375.)-As it was in reply to my Archives Nationales of Paris, I have ob- query at the first reference that the date tained some of the particulars that I required. and place of the earliest use of this familiar

Michel Menager was concerned in the nickname for the Central London Railway celebrated affair of Jean François Charles were settled, it is of interest to put upon de Molette, Comte de Morangiés (March, record that, just seven years to the month 1772-Sept., 1773), and was committed to

from such employment, it has been the Conciergerie for perjury in September, rendered obsolete, as far as its adjectival 1772 (Archives Nationales, 22 3050, pièce half is concerned, by the decision of the 24 bis). It appears probable that this is company's directors in June, 1907, to have the incident alluded to by Horace Walpole differentiated fares, threepence in certain and John Taylor, but the assertion of the cases being chargeable where the uniform latter that the French physician was sent

twopence had served hitherto. But the to the galleys” is not warranted by the facts. essential word remains, and will become Indeed, after an imprisonment of some

permanent,

“ tube railways” being now the inonths, Menager appears to have been accepted Parliamentary and public phrase

or

for electric lines laid in deep subways. The speare's son (p. 826). The surname of first use of “tube as signifying an under this person was Layman: he lived at ground railway, however, was far earlier Horsham, and got into trouble in 1653 than June, 1900, when “ Twopenny Tube” for assaulting Richard Slark. was flashed on a receptive world, for it The name Hamlet is without doubt is to be found more than once in an essay exceedingly uncommon. I remember but entitled ' Air Traction,' included in a volume two other examples, both of which occur of such, brought together under the title of in the eighth volume of the Transactions * Subtle Brains and Lissom Fingers, by of the Leicestershire Architectural and Dr. Andrew Wynter, published in London Archæological Society. They are Hamlet in 1863. Describing a proposed atmospheric Tarrington, 1515 (p. 97); and Hamlett underground line from Euston to the General Dove, 1605 (p. 232). EDWARD PEACOCK. Post Office, by way of Holborn and Smith- Kirton-in-Lindsey. field, it was stated that passengers were [F. J. F. supplied at 8 S. iv. 326 an instance of

to ride in a dark tube”; that it would the name in 1562/3.] be so arranged that between station and station only one group of carriages could

THE REGENT'S CANAL.-From a number of be in the tube at the same time” ; that papers and letters in my possession I have .“ as the atmosphere in these railway tubes ascertained that before the Regent's Canal would be circulating every moment, there Act (52 George III.) was promoted, the would be perfect ventilation ”; and that occupiers and owners of property on ““ this great city will henceforth have its adjacent to the land to be acquired were lighter traffic and parcels and letters carried canvassed to ascertain their views on two on by a circulation of air ramifying in a schemes—the construction of a canal, or network of tubes through soil.” But the of a canal and railway combined. Their project thus glowingly described failed, and votes are classified as follows: for the the name was so completely lost sight of canal, “ Assent,” “ Dissent,”

Nuter” (sic), that, although the City and South London Speciel” (sic); and for the canal and Railway, the pioneer of all the present railway,“ Assent, Dissent," "Nuter" (sic),

tubes, was opened for traffic in the “ Speciel” (sic). The results are remarkable. winter of 1890, the now familiar title was In " the return of John Stevens to Monday never again heard until “the Twopenny evening, 17 January, 1803," at Jew's Harp Tube "commenced operations in the summer Gardens, three occupiers and one owner of 1900.

A. F. R. assent to both. In Lisson Grove three

occupiers dissent from both. In the HampMiss CHUDLEIGH.—On looking over Mr. stead Road (i.e., Chalk Farm Road) two E. H. Coleridge's beautiful edition of

owners vote Speciel” for each. From * Christabel,' which has recently been pub- another return I note that “ Thomas Lord, dished under the auspices of the Royal occupier of the Cricket Ground,” dissents Society of Literature, I see (p. 14) that from both schemes. Coleridge in a letter to Wordsworth dated

One of the most interesting points thus Tuesday (23 Jan.), 1798, says that he revealed is that the promoters suggested resembles “the Duchess of Kingston, who

a railway (i.e., a horse-drawn tramway), in masqueraded in the character of Eve before connexion with the canal, at almost the same the Fall'in flesh-coloured silk.” Although date that a company had commenced the the costume seems to have resembled that Surrey Iron Railway from Croydon to of Eve in her most innocent days, the cha- Wandsworth (see Home Counties' Magazine, racter assumed by Miss Chudleigh, as she vol. ix., Nos. 33 and 34, The Old Croydon styled herself at the time, at the famous Tram Road'). Apart from the papers fancy-dress ball which was commemorated referred to above I have not seen any map by Horace Walpole, was that of Iphigenia.

W. F. PRIDEAUX.

or prospectus of the undertaking, and Mogg's

map London in Miniature (published HAMLET AS A CHRISTIAN NAME.-In a 1 May, 1806), in which the “ Improvements very interesting article in The Cornhill both present and intended ” are shown, Magazine for June, entitled “Wanted, More contains no indication of it. In direction Knowledge,' which treats of the Quarter it evidently proposed to follow, with some Sessions records of the seventeenth century modifications, the plans detailed by Robert for Sussex, the writer remarks: “ The Whitworth in his Report and Survey of name Hamlett as a Christian name is surely the Canal proposed to be made on One „a rare find. I know of no other but Shake- Level from Waltham Abbey to Moorfields.

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