Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

every one who suffers any bodily complaint, and can manage to move, moves up to Stockholm to take gymnastic exercises; young men and maidens, old men and children, if they are too weak or too stout, too little worked or too hard worked, they must "go on the gymnastics" when winter draws on.

And when these doors are shut, I have sufficient evidence through that barrier, that Swedish hilarity at home bears some proportion to Swedish quietness abroad. Such ringing laughter, such fearfully loud voices, might be tolerated, were it not for the offensive—to refined ears I could term it appalling—practice of mingling in common, and even jocund discourse, the most reverend, sacred, or awful words and phrases. My own ears, at least, tingle at some of these sounds, uttered often amid bursts of laughter, or with trifling expressions of pleasure, surprise, or admiration.

The commonest, vulgarest, of Swedish exclamations is Kors Jesu!—Cross of Jesus !—the most sacred words to Christian hearts! And this, contracted usually to Kors, prefaces a remark that a dress is pretty, or a dance is pleasant. The little children can exclaim Herr Gud! with their first accents; and a young lady, who is one of my next-door neighbours, appears to be quite an adept in stringing whole lines of sacred words together, and uttering them as the only means of attracting observation to what she says.

We may ask, Why do not the Priests of the land set themselves against this vile practice? Alas! the Priests themselves are not exempt from it.

End or VOL I.

London: M. S. Myers, Printer, 22, Tavistock Street, Covent Garden.

Just Published, in 2 Vols, post 8vo, price 21s. bound,

FAMILY ROMANCE;

OR,

DOMESTIC ANNALS OF THE ARISTOCRACY.
BY J. BERMTAaa svaxE, ESQ.,

Author of "The Peerage and Baronetage," &c.

Among the many other interesting legends and romantic family histories comprised in these volumes, will be found the following :—The wonderful narrative of Maria Stella, Lady Newborough, who claimed on such strong evidence to be a Princess of the House of Orleans, and disputed the identity of Louis Philippe— The story of the humble marriage of the beautiful Countess of Strathmore, and the fate of her only child—The Leaders of Fashion, from Gramont to D'Orsay— The rise of the celebrated Baron Ward, now Prime Minister at Parma—The curious claim to the Earldom of Crawford—The Strange Vicissitudes of our Great Families, replete with the most romantic details—The story of the Kirkpatrieks of Closeburn (the ancestors of the French Empress), and the remarkable tradition associated with them—The Legend of the Lamptons—The verification in our own time of the famousprediction as to the Earls of Mar—Lady Ogilvy's escape —The Beresford and Wynyard ghost stories, correctly told—&c, &c.

"It were impossible to praise too highly as a work of amusement these most interesting volumes, whether we have regard to its excellent plan, or its not less excellent execution. The volumes are just what ought to be found on every drawingroom table. Here you have nearly fifty captivating romances with the pith of all their interest preserved in undiminished poignancy, and any one may be read in half-an-hour. It is not the least of their merits that the romances are founded on fact—or what at least has been handed down for truth by long tradition—and the romance of reality far exceeds the romance of fiction. Each story is told in the clear, unaffected style with which the author's former works have made the public familiar; while they afford evidence of the value, even to a work of amusement, of that historical and genealogical learning that may be justly expected of the author of the 'The Peerage and Baronetage,' and 'The Landed Gentry,'—each the best of its kind ever published. The aristocracy and gentry owe, indeed, a great debt to Mr. Burke as their family historian."—Standard.

"There is no man living who is better versed than Mr. Burke in the domestic annals of the nobility of this country. In these volumes he has opened a source of interest which cannot fail to be most attractive. Some of the episodes in the career of various families described are of startling character, and tend to explain events of history, which hitherto have appeared inexplicable. Valuable as all Mr. Burke's former literary labours have been, few will attract a more lively curiosity than ' Family Romance.' "—Messenger.

"The very reading for sea.side or fire-side in our hours of idleness."—Athenaeum.

"A work of most entertaining reading, not without points of public and historical interest."—Literary Gazette.

HURST AND BLACKETT, PUBLISHERS, SUCCESSORS TO HENRY COLBURN, 13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.

NEW WORK BY TIIE AUTIIOll OF SAM SLICK.
Now ready at all the Libraries, in 2 Yols., 21s.

SAM SLICK'S WISE SAWS

AND MODERN INSTANCES;

OB, WIHT HE SAID, DID, OB DEVESTED.

"We do not fear to predict that these delightful volumes will be the most popular, as, beyond doubt, they are the best, of all Mr. Haliburton's admirable works. The Wise Saws and Modern Instances evince powers of imagination and expression far beyond what even his former publications could lead any one to ascribe to the author. We have, it is true, long been familiar with his quaint humour and racy narrative, but the volumes before ns take a loftier range, and are so rich in fun and good sense, that to offer an extract as a sample would be an injustice to author and reader. It is one of the pleasantest books we ever read, and we earnestly recommend it."—Standard.

"Let Sam Slick go a mackerel fishing or to court in England—let him venture alone among a tribe of the sauciest single women that ever banded themselves together in electric chain to turn tables or to mystify man—our hero always manages to come off with flying colours—to beat every craftsman in the cunning of his own calling—to get at the heart of every maid's and matron's secret. The book before us will be read and laughed over. Its quaint and racy dialect will please some readers—its abundance of yarns will amuse others. There is something in these two volumes to suit readers of every humour."—Athenaeum.

"Those who expect to find in this work merely a new series of the Sayings and Doings of Sam Slick will be most agreeably surprised. The redoubtable clockmaker is indeed the hero of his own book, inasmuch as he gives us in these volumes the results of his own observations, discoveries, and experiences; but they take us over new ground, and are written in a fresh spirit. In short the book is complete in itself, and stands alone, though it teems from beginning to end with the same rich humour, the same quaint but deep philosophy, the same original views, and the same fund of shrewd observation which so remarkably characterised the former writings of its author. Not a page can be read without a smile, few without a roar, while we follow this American Yorick, this fellow of infinite jest, through his many rambles, wondering at the dexterous manner in which he extricates himself from the most inextricable scrapes, the jovial spirit in which he pursues the wildest adventures, the philosophy, the wit, the pungent satire, which continually burst from his lips. Wherever the English language is spoken these volumes will be welcomed with avidity."— D. S. Magazine. ,

"Full of broad humour, racy comicality, and sly sarcasm on all sorts of people and things."—Globe.

"As a work embodying the cynicism of Rochefoucault with the acuteness of Pascal and the experience of Tlieophrastus or La Bruyere, it may be safely said that, except Don Quixote, the present work has no rival."—Observer.

"There is a fund of wisdom mixed up with Sam Slick's drolleries. His Wise Saws are to the full as instructive, as his Modern Instances are entertaining."— Sun.

"The best volumes that have yet come from the pen of Sam Slick."—Morning Advertiser.

HURST AND BLACK ETT, PUBLISHERS, SUCCESSORS TO HENRY COLBURN, 13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.

13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.

MESSRS. HURST AND BLACKETT,

SUCCESSORS TO MR. COLBURN,

HAVE LATELY PUBLISHED

MEMOIRS OF THE

COURT AND CABINETS

OF GEORGE THE THIRD,

FROM ORIGINAL FAMILY DOCUMENTS.

BY THE DUKE OP BUCKINGHAM AND CHANDOS, K.G., &o.

Second Edition, Revised. 2 vols. 8vo., with Portraits. 30s.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

"These volumes contain much valuable matter. The letters which George, first Marquis of Buckingham, laid by as worthy of preservation, have some claim to see the light, for he held more than one office in the State, and consequently kept up a communication with a great number of historical personages. He himself was twice Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland; first, under Lord Rockingham, and secondly, under Pitt; his most constant correspondents were his two brothers, William and Thomas Grenville, both of whom spent the chief part of their lives in official employments, and of whom the former is sufficiently known to fame as Lord Grenville. The staple of the book is made up of these family documents, but there are also to be found interspersed with the Grenville narrative, letters from every man of note, dating from the death of the elder Pitt to the end of the century. There are three periods upon which they shed a good deal of light. The formation of the Coalition Ministry in 1783, the illness of the King in 1788, and the first war with Republican France. Lord Grenville's letters to his brother afford a good deal of information on the machinations of the Prince's party, and the conduct of the Prince and the Duke of York during the King's illness."—The Times.

"A very remarkable and valuable publication. The Duke of Buckingham has himself undertaken the task of forming a history from the papers of his grandfather and great-uncle, the Earl Temple (first Marquis of Buckingham), and Lord Grenville, of the days of the second Win. Pitt. The letters which are given to the public in these volumes, extend over an interval commencing with 1782, and ending with 1800. In that interval events occurred which can never lose their interest as incidents in the history of England. The Coalition Ministry and its dismissal by the King—the resistance of the Sovereign and Pitt to the efforts of the discarded ministers to force themselves again into office—the great con

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »