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LONDON:
EDWARD MOXON & CO., DOVER STREET.

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PRINTED BY BRADBURY, EVANS, AND CO., WHITEFRIARS ;

THE FRONTISPIECE
FROM A BRONZE IN THE POSSESSION OF J. BERTRAND PAYNE;

THE COVER FROM A DESIGN BY JOHN LEIGHTON, F.S.A. ;
THE SELECTION MADE BY THE KIND PERMISSION OF JOHN MURRAY ;

THE SERIES PROJECTED AND SUPERINTENDED BY

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PREFACE.

The most delicate and thoughtful of English critics has charged the present generation of Englishmen with forgetfulness of Byron. It is not a light charge : and it is not ungrounded. Men born when this century was getting into its forties were baptized into another church than his with the rites of another creed. Upon their ears, first after the cadences of elder poets, fell the faultless and fervent melodies of Tennyson. To them, chief among the past heroes of the younger century, three men appeared as predominant in poetry ; Coleridge, Keats, and Shelley. Behind these were effaced, on either hand, the two great opposing figures of Byron and Wordsworth. No man under twenty can just now be expected to appreciate these. The time was when all boys and girls who paddled in rhyme and dabbled in sentiment were wont to adore the presence or the memory of Byron with foolish faces of praise. It is of little moment to him or to us that they have long since ceased to cackle and begun to hiss. They have become used to better verse and carefuller workmen ; and must be forgiven if after such training they cannot at once appreciate the splendid and imperishable excellence which covers all his offences and outweighs all his defects: the excellence of sincerity and strength. Without these no poet can live ; but few have ever had so much of them as Byron. His sincerity indeed is difficult to discover and define; but it does in effect lie at the root of all his good works: deformed by pretension and defaced by assumption, masked by folly and veiled by affectation; but perceptible after all, and priceless.

It is no part of my present office to rewrite the history of a life in which every date and event that could be given would now seem trite and stale to all possible readers. If, after so many promises and hints, something at once new and true shall at length be unearthed or extricated, which may affect for the better or the worse our judgment of the man, it will be possible and necessary to rewrite it. Meantime this among other chances “lies on the lap of the gods;” and especially on the lap of a goddess who still treads our earth. Until she speaks, we cannot

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