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thinking subsists in these, there are, in reality, as many distinct thinking principles as there are parts, and the mind of every individual must be a congeries, or assemblage of an infinite number of minds. But if thought subsists in none of the parts separately taken, it cannot subsist in the whole; because a whole is nothing more or less than all the parts considered together, and nothing can be found in the whole but what previously exists in the several parts.

During the union between the soul and the body, the organs of the latter become the instruments of perception; but it is the mind alone which thinks, which alone is conscious, which sees in the eye, hears in the ear, feels in the touch. The Infinite Spirit is, consequently, all eye, all ear, all intelligence, perception, and.....

V. The spirituality of the Divine Nature lays a foundation for the most intimate relation between the intelligent part of the creation and himself. He is emphatically “ the Father of Spirits.” The relation of the parent to the child is very intimate and close, because the parent is the instrument of his being; but God is the AUTHOR. The earthly parent is our father after the flesh, the heavenly is our father after the spirit ; and in proportion as the mind constitutes the most important portion of our nature, the relation subsisting between us and God is the most interesting and the most essential. “He is not far from any of us, seeing we are his offspring: in him we live, and move,

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and have our being.”* The body connects us with the external universe; the soul connects us with God. The flesh is his production; the spirit is his image: and, as the former separates us from him by a dissimilarity of nature, so the latter assimilates us to him by the possession of principles and laws congenial with his own.

VI. The spirituality of the Divine Nature fits him for becoming our eternal portion and supreme good. That which constitutes and secures our felicity, must be something out of ourselves; since we find ourselves utterly inadequate to be the source of our own enjoyment, we find that, without allying ourselves to an object distinct from our own nature, we are desolate and miserable. To retire within our own nature in quest of happiness, is an idle and fruitless attempt. The mind feels itself fettered and imprisoned until it is allowed to go forth, and unite itself to some foreign object.

Again, to form the happiness of a mind must be the prerogative of something superior to itself; nor is there any greater superiority conceivable than that of being the source of enjoyment, the bestower of happiness on another. But while it is superior, it must be congenial in its nature. A spiritual being must possess spiritual happiness ; the proper enjoyment of the mind must consist in something mental.

* Acts xvii. 27, 28.

III.

OUTLINE OF THE ARGUMENT OF TWELVE LEC

TURES ON THE SOCINIAN CONTROVERSY.*

INTRODUCTORY LECTURE.

Jude 3.It was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort

you, that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered to the saints.

LECTURE II.

ON THE PRE-EXISTENCE OF CHRIST. Matt. xxii. 41, 42.While the Pharisees were gathered together,

Jesus asked them, saying, What think ye of Christ? whose son is he?

Four classes of passages adduced in proof of this.

I. Those passages which speak of the origin of Jesus Christ, and which accompany this by a specification of “the flesh” in such a formula that the flesh is never employed in a similar manner in the history of men.

II. Those passages in which it is affirmed by Jesus Christ and by his disciples, that he did come down from heaven to the earth, and that by virtue of his name.

III. Those passages which, though they do not exactly assert that Jesus Christ existed before he came into our world, yet this is the necessary conclusion from them.

* Delivered at Leicester in 1823.

IV. One passage in which our Lord directly affirms this proposition in so many words, and no other proposition. (John viii. 58.)

LECTURE III.

ON THE DIVINITY OF CHRIST.

Matt. xxii. 41, 42. This attempted to be proved from those passages in which the titles of God are ascribed to Jesus Christ, of which there are three kinds :

I. Those in which he is styled the Son of God.

II. Those in which he is styled not the Son of God, but God himself.

III. Those which are quoted by the apostles from the Old Testament, in which the word Jehovah is ascribed to Jesus Christ.

LECTURE IV. The Divinity of Christ proved from those passages in which the creation of the visible universe is ascribed to the Lord Jesus Christ.

I. This fact established by scripture testimony, and

II. The attention directed to the necessary conclusion which is to be derived from it, That if Jesus Christ appear by scripture testimony to be the Creator of all things, he is necessarily God; since the primary idea which man entertains of God identifies those perfections which created the world with the existence of Deity:

LECTURE V.

THE DIVINITY OF CHRIST PROVED FROM HIS BEING THE OBJECT OF

DIVINE WORSHIP.

Worship may be considered as mental or local. It is to mental worship, as consisting of those sentiments of adoration of the Deity for his great mercies, a dependence upon the Author of them, a desire of his favour, and submission to his will, which mark every devout christian, and expressed in the language of prayer or praise, to which this part of the discussion is chiefly confined.

LECTURE VI.

THE DIVINITY OF CHRIST PROVED FROM CERTAIN MISCELLANEOUS

CONSIDERATIONS, which COULD NOT WITH CONVENIENCE BE REDUCED TO ANY ONE HEAD, SIMILAR TO THOSE ALREADY BROUGHT FORWARD.

I. If Jesus Christ be not a divine person, let me say, it is utterly inconceivable how he can discharge the office and assumption of Head of the Church, and Lord of the christian dispensation.

II. The simple humanity of Christ is utterly inconsistent with those perfections which are ascribed to the Saviour; since there is not a single attribute of the divine nature which is not found ascribed in different forms to our Lord Jesus Christ.

III. The idea of the simple humanity of Christ is utterly incompatible with that ardour of sentiment, of which he is represented in every part of scripture as the object.

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