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« One thrust of thine outrageous hora

Has guld the knight so sore, That to the church-yard he is borne,

To range our glens no more.»

An Austrian poble left the stour,

And fast the tihi 'gan take; And he arrived in luckless hour

At Sempach on the lake.

He and his squire a fisher call'd

(llis name was llans Von Rot), « For love, or ineed, or charity,

Receive us in thy boat.is

Their anxious call the fisher heard,

And, glad the meed to win, Dis shallop to the shore lie sleerd,

And took the flyers in.

And wliile against the tide and wind

Hans stoutly row'd his way, The noble to liis followers signd

He should the boatman slay.

The original of these verses occurs in a German popular songs, entitled SammluVolkslieder, Brolin, 1807, published by Me and Von der Hagen, both, and more espec distinguished for thrir acquaintance witre popular poetry and legendary history of i

In the German editor's notice of the stated to have been extracted from Chronicle of Nicolaus Thomano, chaplain in Weisenhorn, which bears the date song is slated by the author to have been in the neiglıbourhood at that early perio as quoted by the German editor, seer have believed the event lie narrates. I stones and obituaries to prove the crist! sonages of the ballid, and discovers tually d ed on the rith My, 1349, a Lal Countess of Marstetten, who was bit of Moringer. This lady lie supposes to ringer's daughter mentioned in the bal the same authority for the death of Neuffen in the same year. The editor seem to embrace the opinion of Prof. Ulin, who, from the language of the ba date to the 15th ceptury.

The legend itself turns on an inciden Germany, and which perhaps was not pen in more insta:ices than one, whet long in the lloly Land, and their disco ceived no tidings of their fate. A stor circumstances, but without the mirar of Saint Thomas, is told of one of the Haigh-hall, in Lancashire, the patrimo the late Countess of Balcarras; and of represented on stained glass upon > ancient manor-house.

The fisher's back was to them turn'd,

The squire his dagcer drew, Hans saw bis shadow in the lake,

The boat he overthrew.

He 'whelmid the boat, and as they strove,

le stupu'd them with his oar; « Now, drink ye deep, my gentle sirs,

You'll ne'er stab boatman more.

« Two gilded fishes in the lake

This morning have I caught,
Their silver scales may much avail,

Their carrion flesh is naught.» 1 A pun on the URUS, or wild bull, which gives name to the canton of Uri.

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« Dost fear? dost fear? The moon shines clear,

And well the dead can ride;
Does faithful Helen fear for them?»

« O leave in peace the dead!»

« Barb ! barb! methinks I hear the cock;

The sand will soon be run:
Barb! barb! I smell the morning air;

The race is well nigh done.»

Tramp! tramp! along the land they rode,

Splash! splash! along the sea ; The scourge is red, the spur drops blood,

The flashing pebbles flee.

« Hurrah! hurrah! well ride the dead;

The bride, the bride is come! And soon we reach the bridal bed, For, Helen, here's

my

home.»

Reluctant on its rusty hinge

Revolved an iron door, And by the pale moon's setting beam

Were seen a church and tower,

THESE verses are a literal translation of an ancient Saie, ballad upon the battle of Sempach, fought oth Jul, 1386, being the victory by which the Swiss can1065 év tablished their independence. The author is Albert Tchudi, denominated the Souter, from his profession of a shoemaker. He was a citizen of Lucerne, esteemed highly among his countrymen, both for bis powers BI Meister-singer or minstrel, and his courage as a scidier; so that he mighe share the praise conferred by Collins on Eschylus, that,

-Not alone be nursed the poet's flame,

But reach'd from Virtue's hand the patriot steel. The circumstance of their being written by a part returning from the well-fought field he describes, and in which bis country's fortune was secured, may ceas on Tchudi's verses an interest which they are nole titled to claim from their poetical merit.

But babes poetry, the more literally it is translated, the more loses its simplicity, without acquiring cither graceer' strength; and therefore some of the frults of the must be imputed to the translator's feeling it a duty to keep as closely as possible to his original. The various puns, rude attempts at pleasantry, and disproportion episodes, must be set down to Tchudi's account, or te : the taste of his age.

The military antiquary will derive some amusemei from the minute particulars which the martial port des recorded. The mode in which the Austrian med-xarms received the charge of the Swiss was by forming a phalanx, which they defended with their long 120% The gallant Winkelried, who sacrificed his own life bo rushing among the spears, clasping in his arms as ml as he could grasp, and thus opeoing a gap in these I battalions, is celebrated in Swiss history. When fait... mingled together, the unwieldy length of their we pons,

aud cumbrous weight of their defensive armou rendered the Austrian men-at-arms a very utca match for the light-armed mountaineers. The victoria obtained by the Swiss over the German chivalry, ttherto deemed as formidable on foot as ou borseberi, led to important changes in the art of war. The per i describes the Austrian knights and squires as culius the peaks from their boots cre they could acl upec foot, in allusion to an inconvenient piece of fopper?, often mentioned in the middle ages. Leopold III.

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«0 llare-castle,2 thou heart of bare!,

This seems to allade to the preposterous fashion, during the Fierce Oxenstern replied;

middle ages, of wearing boots with the points or peaks turned up

wards, and so long that, in some cases, they were fastened to the « Shalt see then how the game will fare,»

knees of the wearer with small chains. When they alighted to fight The launting knight replied.

apon foot, it would seem that the Austrian gentlemen found it ne* All the Swiss clergy who were able to bear arms fought in this cessary to cut off these peaks, that they might move with the neces

sary activity. patriotic war. Io the original, Haasenstein, or Hare-stone.

: A pun on the Archduke's name, Leopold.

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« One thrust of thine outrageous horn

Has gul'd lloc knight so sore, Thal to the church.yard he is borne,

To range our glens no more.»

An Austrian noble left the stour,

And fast the ti; ht gan take; And he arrived in luckless hour

At Sempach on the lake.

He and his squire a fisher call'd

(llis name was llans Von Rot), « For love, or meed, or charity,

Receive us in thy boat.

song

Their anxious call the fisher heard,

And, glad the meed to win, His shallop to the shore he sleerd,

And took the flyers in.

Anii while against the tide and wind

Hans stoutly row'd his way, The noble to his followers sign'd

He should the boatman slay.

The original of these verses occurs in a collection of German popular songs, entitled Sammlung Deuts, bet Volkslieder, Brolio, 1807, published by Mesrs fiosetiap and Von der Dagen, both, and more especially the distinguished for their acquaintance with the popular poetry and legendary history of Germany.

In the German editor's notice of the ballad, F stated to have been extracted from a maoners Chronicle of Nicolaus Thomapn, chaplain to Si Leears in Weisenhorn, which bears the late 1533; apd ex

is stated by the author to have been generalki in the peighbourhood at that early period. There as quoted by the German editor, seems faithia. " have believed the event lie narrates. le quotes stones and obituaries to prove the existence of 17* sonages of the ballad, and discovers that there tually d ed on the vith May, 1319, a Ladę l'oa Seats Countess of Marstellen, who was by birth of tb? A* of Moringer. This lady he supposes to leave been in ringer's daughter mentioned in die ballad. He goes the same authority for the death of Berckhet! Vad Neuffeu in the same year.

The editors, on the story. seem to embrace the opinion of Professor Smith Ulm, wbo, from the language of the ballad, aschbesi" date to the 15th century.

The legend itself turns on an incident not peculas Germany, and which perhaps was not uphiker in ti* pen in more instapices than one, when crusaders am long in the lloly Land, and their disconsolate damer ceived no tidings of their fate. A story very similar le circumstaoces, but without the miraculous machines of Saint Thomas, is cold of one of the ancient lords ! Haiph-ball, in Lancashire, the patrimonialinheritance or the late Countess of Balcarras; and the particulars gate represented on stained glass upon a window in the ancient manor house.

The fisher's back was to them turn'd,

The squire his dagger drew, Ilans saw his shadow in the lake,

The boat he overthrew.

He 'whelm'd the boat, and as they strove,

He stunu'd them with his oar; « Now, drink ye deep, my gentle sirs,

You 'll ne'er stab boatman more.

* Two gilded fishes in the lake

This moroing have I caught,
Their silver scales may mucha avail,

Their carrion flesh is naught.» "A pun on tbe Urus, or wild bull, which gives game to the canton of Cri.

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