Letters from head-quarters: or, The realities of the war in the Crimea

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Стр. 233 - BANG!" and a shell exploded a few feet from them, to their intense disgust and the discomfiture of their dinner arrangements. On this being repeated a second time, they thought it more prudent to shift their dining-place to a spot less attractive to Russian shot and shell. Sir George Cathcart is all anxiety to assault the town, and, I believe, thinks he could take it with his division alone. I fear he is somewhat rash, and • appears to wish to cut out a line of his own. I have thus endeavoured...
Стр. 65 - HT Butler, of the 55th regiment — selected for employment on the Quartermaster-General's Staff, when the army first embarked for Turkey, solely on account of the ability he had shown in his studies at the Royal Military College. I trust...
Стр. 314 - Lord Raglan wishes the cavalry tc advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy, and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. Troop of Horse Artillery may accompany. French cavalry is on your left. Immediate.
Стр. 317 - Such was not the case, as ho remained unhurt ; however, his horse took fright — swerved round — and galloped off with him to the rear, passing on the way by the 4th Light Dragoons and 8th Hussars before those regiments got up to the battery...
Стр. 264 - He was walking about a hundred yards in advance of his tent in the open. I rode up to him, and dismounted, and might have been in conversation with him five minutes. We were all at once interrupted by that most disagreeable sound — a shot approaching. We both looked up, but, the sun being in our eyes, could see nothing. Sir George lay down, and I endeavoured to do the same, but my horse began to take alarm, and it was as much as I could do to hold him.
Стр. 183 - The men were tired, and many almost exhausted for want of water. Lord Raglan rode up and down the line of troops, the men cheering him vociferously. There was such a shaking of hands; one felt very choky about the throat, and very much inclined to cry, as one wrung the hand of a friend; and 'God bless you, old fellow — so glad to see you all right!' and like expressions, were heard on every side between brother officers. It was a touching sight to see the meeting between Lord Raglan and Sir Colin...
Стр. 418 - A sergeant approached us, carrying canteens of water to take up for the wounded, and as Lord Raglan passed, he drew himself up to make the usual salute, when a round shot came bounding over the hill, and knocked his forage-cap off his head. The man calmly picked up his cap, dusted it on his knee, placed it carefully on his head, and then made the military salute, and all without moving a muscle of his countenance. Lord Raglan was delighted with the man's coolness, and said to him, "A near thing that,...
Стр. 183 - ... officers. It was a touching sight to see the meeting between Lord Raglan and Sir Colin Campbell. The latter was on foot, as his horse had been killed in the earlier part of the action. He went up to his Lordship, and, with tears in his eyes, shook hands, saying it was not the first battle-field they had won together, and that now he had a favour to ask, namely, that as his Highlanders had done so well, he might be allowed to claim the privilege of wearing a Scotch bonnet. To this Lord Raglan,...
Стр. 64 - JA Butler, of wounds and fatigue at the siege of Silistria. During the whole of that memorable siege your son displayed very rare qualities, combining, with the skill and intelligence of an accomplished officer, the intrepidity of the most daring soldier...
Стр. 40 - ... rations our men have than theirs. Yet, if you were to believe the English newspapers, everything we have is not to be compared to the French. Somehow or other, I don't know how it is, but the reporters of the English journals have made themselves very unpopular. They appear to try and find fault whenever they can, and throw as much blame and contempt on the English authorities as if their object was to bring the British army into disrepute with our allies. Altogether they seem to write in a bad...

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