The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell: Volume 3, 1874-1879

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Cambridge University Press, 1990 - Всего страниц: 960
This is a comprehensive edition of Maxwell's manuscript papers published virtually complete and largely for the first time.
 

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Содержание

VI
xxv
VII
27
VIII
377
XI
379
XIII
380
XIV
383
XVI
387
XIX
388
LXII
456
LXV
457
LXVI
458
LXVIII
459
LXIX
576
LXXII
578
LXXIII
584
LXXIV
585

XXI
390
XXIV
391
XXVI
394
XXVII
396
XXVIII
397
XXIX
404
XXX
408
XXXI
410
XXXII
413
XXXIII
415
XXXIV
417
XXXV
421
XXXVI
427
XXXIX
429
XLII
431
XLIII
432
XLV
435
XLVI
437
XLVII
440
L
442
LIII
444
LIV
445
LVII
446
LX
448
LXI
450
LXXVI
592
LXXVIII
602
LXXXI
605
LXXXII
607
LXXXIII
609
LXXXIV
610
LXXXVI
638
LXXXVII
640
LXXXIX
641
XC
642
XCIV
643
XCV
644
XCVI
645
XCVII
659
C
661
CI
666
CII
667
CIII
670
CV
673
CVI
677
CVIII
854
CIX
898
CX
907
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Об авторе (1990)

James Maxwell was a British physicist who developed a standard theoretical model for the modern understanding of electricity and magnetism. He showed that these two phenomena are two aspects of the same field and as a result he unified and systematized a vast field of research. Maxwell took many diverse observations and qualitative concepts developed by Michael Faraday and others, formulating them into a unified theory between 1864 and 1873. On the basis of this theory, Maxwell predicted that electromagnetic waves should exist and travel with the speed of light, and he identified light as a form of electromagnetic radiation. Both of these predictions were experimentally confirmed. Maxwell's other great contribution to physics was formulating a mathematical basis for the kinetic theory of gases. Using a statistical approach, he related the velocity of the molecules in a gas to its temperature, showing that heat results from the motion of molecules. Maxwell's result had been conjectured for some time, but it had never been supported experimentally. Maxwell then expanded his research to study viscosity, diffusion, and other properties of gases. Maxwell also provided the first satisfactory explanation of Saturn's rings. He established on theoretical grounds that the rings are not solid but rather composed of many small, fragmented objects that orbit Saturn.

P. M. HARMAN is Professor of the History of Science at Lancaster University.

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