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Leotard works. The front of the box can | If you wish to place a glass in front of it either be painted, or a piece of white paper (which would certainly give it a more can be pasted over it to improve its appear- finished look) you can easily do so by getance, and if you have a taste for drawing, ting a glazier to cut you a piece the required you might paint some suitable background. size, and nailing four small pieces of wood We must now make our Leotard : to do at each corner of your stand, in order that which you must draw his, or any figure you the glass may not touch your Leotard, and choose, on a piece of cardboard ; his head thus impede his movements ; you should must be cut separate from his body; his then secure it with a little putty. You can knees, arms, legs, &c., must also be all now paste some brown or other paper over separate. These you must join together in the whole, in order to improve its appeartheir proper places with pieces of thin wire, ance; and, if you like, you can place a small giving all the parts plenty of play, as the stage over it, and which would certainly success of the most amusing performances add to the effect, and it is finished. much depends upon the freedom of the Though easy and inexpensive to make, working of your figure, whose coat, &c., can this is really a capital and very amusing be painted whatever colour or colours you toy, if it deserves no better name; and I am like best. You must now fix your Leotard sure you will never regret either the time by placing the bar through his hands, to or trouble you may have spent in making it. which (the bar) you must firmly fasten

J. J. HISSEY. them, and your machine is nearly finished.

THE BOY'S RECITER.

remorse.

9. CEUR-DE-LION AT THE BIER OF HIS As if each deeply-furrowed trace FATHER. * (Mrs. Hemans.)

Of earthly years to show,

Alas ! that sceptred mortal's race An example of deep grief, amounting to

Had surely closed in woe ! anguish, in the expression of regret and The opening stanzas, however,

The marble floor was swept exemplify sublimity and grandeur, tinged By many a long dark stole, with deep gloom.

As the kneeling priests round him that slept, TORCHES were blazing clear,

Sang mass for the parted soul ;

And solemn were the strains they poured Hymns pealing deep and slow, Where a king lay stately on his bier,

Through the stillness of the night,

With the cross above, and the crown and In the church of Fontevraud. Banners of battle o'er him hung,

sword, And warriors slept beneath,

And the silent king in sight. And light, as Noon's broad light, was flung

There was heard a heavy clang, On the settled face of death,

As of steel-girt men the tread;

And the tombs and the hollow pavement rang On the settled face of death A strong and ruddy glare,

With a sounding thrill of dread; Though dimmed, at times, by the censer's

And the holy chant was hushed awhile,

As, by the torches' flame, breath, Yet it fell still brightest there;

A gleam of arms, up the sweeping aisle,

With a mail-clad leader came. * The body of Henry the Second lay in state in the Abbey church of Fontevraud, where it

He came with haughty look, was visited by Richard Cour-de-Lion, who, on An eagle-glance and clear, beholding it, was struck with horror and re. But his proud heart through its breast-plate morse, and bitterly reproached himself for that rebellious conduct which had been the means of

shook, bringing his father to an untimely grave.

When he stood beside the bier!

these permanently until the wheel is made ; prevents it from slipping or giving way. and here some little care and patience will Having fixed your axle securely, you must be required. Your wheel should be four make a hole for it in the front of your box, inches in diameter : to make it you must which you must take care to make not describe two circles of that size on a piece larger than is actually required for the free of cardboard, and then carefully cut them working of the parts. out with a pair of old scissors; these are We have the two partitions already made, the discs of your wheel, which you must but not fixed, as before we secure them we take care to make smooth round the edges. shall have to make a hole for the sand to The next thing to be done is to make the fall out of. This must be made a little to buckets, or rather compartments of the the left of the wheel ; the whole should be wheel ; and great care will be required to get two inches long and three-quarters of an them all at equal distances, the best way to inch wide. That is of course considerably ensure which is to mark the places for them larger than will be required for the sand to on both your discs. There should be eight run out of; a part of it is, however, closed compartments, and therefore you will have with a trap-door that prevents the sand to mark eight divisions, to do which you from falling out, except through the proper must divide the discs, first into quarters, place. The reason of this is, that when all and then into half-quarters; the divisions your sand is run away from the top division must be made of cardboard, for which you you may turn your machine over, and the must cut out eight pieces, each one inch trap-door will give way and let the sand in, long by three-quarters of an inch wide. You and thus set your wheel in motion again. should fix these securely between your discs The trap-door must be made out of a piece with short pins, after which you must care- of leather, one end being tacked down fully go round the crevices and joints with either with small pins or tin tacks, thus liquid glue, using an old feather or brush; making it to open like a door. You must, this in order that no sand may get in be- however, leave about a quarter of an inch tween, and thus both escape and damage space at the end, in order to allow the reyour wheel. You have now the divisions of quired quantity of sand to run out to turn your wheel fixed, but as it now is, the sand your wheel. Having made your trap-door, would fall through them—the partitions you must make a small spout of cardboard want a bottom to each. These can be made from the spare space, in order to convey the out of cardboard, which you must securely sand to the wheel; the bottom partition fix with glue at the bottom of each division, must have a trap-door and spout precisely you must be careful not to leave any crevice similar to the upper one, so that while the through which the sand might work. In machine is in motion, the sand falling down some places a little sealing-wax might be will enter the lower division by the trapfound useful; but if you can do without it, door, which, when you turn your machine I should not advise you to use any, as a over, prevents it from escaping, except quantity of it would be apt to overbalance through the spout. Thus, after the machine your wheel, having finished which to your stops through all the sand being run out of satisfaction, we will proceed to make its the upper division, you will merely have to axle, which goes through the front of the turn it over in order to set it in motion box and forms the bar on which our Leo-again. We must now fix the wheel, &c., tard works. The axle consists of a piece of and nail the back securely on; after which stout wire, which, if it were simply placed you must paste some brown paper round through the centre of your wheel, would be the edges, to prevent the sand from escapapt to slip and get loose; to guard against ing through any corner or crevice. which we must first fix the axle in the centre Our machine is now all enclosed in the of an oblong piece of wood, and to receive box, only the end of the axle of the wheel which you must cut a square hole through projects through the front, and this forms, the centre of your wheel; this effectually as I before explained, the bar on which our Leotard works. The front of the box can If you wish to place a glass in front of it either be painted, or a piece of white paper (which would certainly give it a more can be pasted over it to improve its appear. finished look) you can easily do so by getance, and if you have a taste for drawing, ting a glazier to cut you a piece the required you might paint some suitable background. size, and nailing four small pieces of wood We must now make our Leotard : to do at each corner of your stand, in order that which you must draw his, or any figure you the glass may not touch your Leotard, and choose, on a piece of cardboard ; his head thus impede his movements ; you should must be cut separate from his body; his then secure it with a little putty. You can knees, arms, legs, &c., must also be all now paste some brown or other paper over separate. These you must join together in the whole, in order to improve its appeartheir proper places with pieces of thin wire, ance; and, if you like, you can place a small giving all the parts plenty of play, as the stage over it, and which would certainly success of the most amusing performances add to the effect, and it is finished. much depends upon the freedom of the Though easy and inexpensive to make, working of your figure, whose coat, &c., can this is really a capital and very amusing be painted whatever colour or colours you toy, if it deserves no better name; and I am like best. You must now fix your Leotard sure you will never regret either the time by placing the bar through his hands, to or trouble you may have spent in making it. which (the bar) you must firmly fasten

J. J. HISSEY. them, and your machine is nearly finished.

THE BOY'S RECITER.

9. CEUR-DE-LION AT THE BIER OF HIS As if each deeply-furrowed trace FATHER.* (Mrs. Hemans.)

Of earthly years to show,

Alas ! that sceptred mortal's race An example of deep grief, amounting to

Had surely closed in woe ! anguish, in the expression of regret and remorse. The opening stanzas, however,

The marble floor was swept exemplify sublimity and grandeur, tinged By many a long dark stole, with deep gloom.

As the kneeling priests round him that slept, TORCHES were blazing clear,

Sang mass for the parted soul ;

And solemn were the strains they poured Hymns pealing deep and slow, Where a king lay stately on his bier,

Through the stillness of the night, In the church of Fontevraud.

With the cross above, and the crown and Banners of battle o'er him hung,

sword, And warriors slept beneath,

And the silent king in sight. And light, as Noon's broad light, was flung

There was heard a heavy clang, On the settled face of death,

As of steel-girt men the tread;

And the tombs and the hollow pavement rang On the settled face of death A strong and ruddy glare,

With a sounding thrill of dread; Though dimmed, at times, by the censer's

And the holy chant was hushed awhile,

As, by the torches' flame, breath, Yet it fell still brightest there;

A gleam of arms, up the sweeping aisle,

With a mail-clad leader came. The body of Henry the Second lay in state in the Abbey church of Fontevraud, where it

He came with haughty look, was visited by Richard Cour-de-Lion, who, on An eagle-glance and clear, beholding it, was struck with horror and re: But his proud heart through its breast-plate morse, and bitterly reproached himself for that

shook, rebellious conduct which had been the means of bringing his father to an untimely grave.

When he stood beside the bier!

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I weep,

He stood there still with a drooping brow, And there before the blessed shrine,

And clasped hands o'er it raised ;-- My sire! I see thee lie, For his father lay before him low,

How will that sad still face of thine
It was Caur-de-Lion gazed !

Look on me, till I die!”
And silently he strove
With the workings of his breast,

10. THE GRAVE OF KÖRXER.
But there's more in late repentant love
Than steel may keep suppressed!

(Mrs. Hemans.) And his tears brake forth, at last, like rain; GREEN wave the oak for ever o'er thy rest! Men held their breath in awe,

Thou that beneath its crowning foliage For his face was seen by his warrior-train, sleepest,

And he recked not that they saw. And, in the stillness of thy country's breast, He looked upon the dead,

Thy place of memory, as an altar, keepest:

Brightly the spirit o'er her hills was poured, And sorrow seemed to lie,

Thou of the lyre and sword !
A weight of sorrow, even like lead,
Pale on the fast-shut eye.

Rest, bard! rest, soldier ! - By the father's
He stooped --- and kissed the frozen cheek, hand
And the heavy hand of clay,

Here shall the child of after years be led, Till bursting words, — yet all too weak, — With his wreath-offering silently to stand Gave his soul's passion way.

In the hushed presence of the glorious Oh, father! is it vain,

dead, This late remorse and deep ?

Soldier and hard ! For thou thy path

hast trod, Speak to me, father! once again,

With Freedom and with God. behold, I weep! Alas! my guilty pride and ire!

The oak waved proudly o'er thy burial rite; Were but this work undone, I would give England's crown, my sire !

On thy crowned bier to slumber warriors

bore thee; To hear thee bless thy son.

And with true hearts, thy brethren of the “Speak to me! mighty grief

fight Ere now the dust hath stirred !

Wept as they veiled their drooping Hear me, but hear me!-- father, chief,

banners o'er thee; My king! I must be heard !

And the deep guns, with rolling peal gave Hushed, hushed - how is it that I call,

token And that thou answerest not?

That lyre and sword were broken. When was it thus? - Woe, woe for all The love my soul forgot!

Thou hast a hero's tomb !-A lowlier bed

Is hers, the gentle girl beside thee lying, “ Thy silver hairs I see,

The gentle girl, that bowed her fair young So still, so sadly bright!

thead, And father, father ! but for me,

When thou wert gone, in silent sorrow They had not been so white !

dying. I bore thee down, high heart! at last, Brother !true friend the tender and the No longer couldst thou strive;

brave! Oh! for one moment of the past,

She pined to share thy grave. To kneel and say, 'Forgive!'

* Charles Theodore Korner, the young Ger“ Thou wert the noblest king,

man poet and soldier, was killed in a skirmish On royal throne e'er seen;

with a detachment of French troops on the 26th

of August, 1813, a few hours after the compoAnd thou didst wear, in kmightly ring, sition of his most popular piece, “The Sword Of all the stateliest mien ;

Song.” He was buried under a beautiful oak, And thou didst prove, where spears are

in a recess of which he had frequently deposited

verses composed by him while campaigning in. proved

its vicinity. The monument erected to his meIn war the bravest heart,

mory, beneath this tree, is of cast iron, and tho -Oh! ever the renowned and loved

upper part is wrought into a lyre and sword, a

favourite emblem of Korner's, from which one Thou wert, - and there thou art !

of his works had been entitled.

Near the grave of the poet is that of his only “ Thou that my boyhood's guide

sister, who died of grief for his loss, having surDidst take fond joy to be!.

vived him only long enough to complete his

portrait and a drawing of his burial-place. Over The times I've sported at thy side,

the gate of the cemetery is engraved one of his And climbed thy parent knee !

own lines, “Forget not the faithful dead."

ful eye,

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Fame was thy gift from others ;--but for her,

11. THE PROFESSOR'S DREAM.* To whom the wide earth held that only spot,

Dramatic effect in dialogue style, and the She loved thee! - lovely in your lives ye manner of intentional exaggeration in voice, were,

attitude, and action, are the main characAnd in your early deaths divided not. teristics of elocution in the recitation of this Thou hast thine oak,--thy trophy,—what burlesque production. hath she ? Her own bless'd place by thee.

“MILLIONS of years the world has been a

making;

Millions of years, as Tom Hill saysIt was thy spirit, brother! which had

Pooh! MILLIONS ! made The bright world glorious to her thought- All other theories are but a take-in :

I challenge the most profound civilians, Since first in childhood ’midst the vines ye

And every theologian in the nation ;

As to Moses, played,

No one supposes And sent glad singing through the free blue sky.

Aught in disparagement of such a pen as Ye were but two!—and when that spirit But only, as regards the Book of Genesis,

his, passed,

We want a NEW TRANSLATION !” Woe for the one, the last !

The sage Professor said, Woe :-yet not long :-she lingered but to

Then went to bed; trace Thine image from the image in her And quite fatigued with having made so breast

great a

Discovery, three several strata,Once, once again, to see that buried face But smile upon her, ere she went to Sheet, blanket, counterpane,--pulled o'er

his head; rest. Too sad a smile !-its living light was

And thus enveloped from the crown to toes,

His nose
It answered hers no more!

Soon gave sonorous symptoms of a doze:

Heavy his respiration was and thick. The earth grew silent when thy voice

He had begun to lose

His senses in a most delicious snooze, departed, The home too lonely whence thy step had When from beneath the bed up jumped

Old Nick! What, then, was left for her, the faithful

“Hillo!” quoth Satan, “Doctor, how d’ye

do ?hearted ? Death, death, to still the yearning for the

Roused by the diabolic "Hillo!” dead !-

The savant grumbled from his pillow,

“ Who are you?” Softly she perished. Be the flower de- In phrase, of late endemic, plored

“Come, come,” said Lucifer, Here, with the lyre and sword.

Looking a little blue-ly, Have ye not met ere now? So let those "Upon my life I never flew so far,

And found a gentleman take things so trust That meet for moments but to part for How'er bemused by drunkenness or revel

coolly, years ;

Who am I? quoth-a! That weep, watch, pray, to hold back dust

By my troth a from dust, That love, where love is but a fount of Pretty question !-Why, Sir, I'm them

ahem ! tears! Brother! sweet sister! peace around ye

And let me hint, you're in a tightish

hobble;
dwell.

For here I come to ramp and roar,
Lyre, sword, and flower,-farewell!

Seeking whom I may devour !

If you want proofs,
Look at my hoofs,

o'er ;

fed :

* A squib aimed at Dr. Buckland's theory of the Creation,

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