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grey mist lay over the bushes, the grass | after being missed two, three, or four times, around me was very damp, and the bear's till they lamentably fall victims to their black hide was silvered over with dew. maternal love. I always carried such an From all sides the loud chuckling of the instrument about me, as all the larger turkeys reached me, and I felt a tickling in beasts of prey can be easily attracted by my forefinger to bend it upon one of these it, such as bears, tigers, panthers, wolves, birds; but then I looked at the mountain lynxes, &c., and the beautifully striped of flesh which lay before me, and rested my leopard cats, which are very numerous rifle again against the tree, and went to the about us, and are easily deceived by it. fire to pull the paw out of the ashes. The I at length again reached the limestone fire soon burnt brightly, and dispersed the region ; but I must have been a great deal cold damp air around me. I put coffee on too far east; for the mountain chain was and a bear's rib before the fire, led Czar to much lower than at the spot where I had the stream, and refreshed myself and him. crossed it. This view was soon confirmed Then I returned to the fire, led my horse when I went down into the valley and found into the oats, and paid my respects to the all the streams I crossed small and insignifibear's paw and rib. The sun was also cant. The country continually became more darting his rays through the trees, when I pleasant and rich, the valleys grew broader, was ready to start, and rode through the and the vegetation was more luxuriant than stream towards the dense forest.

in the desolate, melancholy ravines I had From this point my journey was for several been lately riding along. I daily expected days a most fatiguing and far from pleasant to see well-known mountains, and looked one. I constantly went up and down barren, about more especially for a very high point stony hills, and found scarce grass enough on a mountain chain which runs southward to feed my horse; we also both suffered from Turkey Creek to the Rio Grande, on from the want of water, which was the more which the Indians have built a pyramid of perceptible on the bare, heated rocks. I large stones, either put up as a finger-post could only proceed short distances, as for the wandering tribes, or as a border through the constant marching on very hard mark between the different hunting-grounds. stones Czar's feet were beginning to swell, One morning I had just left camp, and was and though he was not lame, he put them riding through an extensive prairie, when I down very gingerly. There was certainly fancied I could recognize this landmark, and no lack of game, as I always met turkeys convinced myself by the aid of my glass that and deer in the neighbourhood of water, and I was not mistaken. I felt myself at home on such uneven ground it is very easy to again, although this point was a good day's stalk the game. Although it may offend journey from my house : still I knew in the feelings of the true sportsman, I will which direction my road lay; and eagerly confess that on this ride I shot several fawns went along it. About noon I reached one for the sake of their tender flesh : I also of those most troublesome cactus-woods, killed a very large jaguar, which I attracted which frequently run across the prairies. by imitating the cry of a complaining fawn. The present one ran like a wall for miles It leaped within twenty yards of me ere it across my path. There is no chance of noticed me, but then stopped and looked riding through these thickets, as the prickly round for its victim, swinging its long tail plants grow closely together. Though they high up in the air. The bullet went through are most disagreeable to the hunter, their its head and laid it dead. The Indians make appearance is most attractive to the natua sort of wooden pipe, which so admirably ralist, through the brilliant colour of the imitates the moan of a fawn, that every old cactus flowers and the peculiar shape of the animal within the distance of a mile round plants. This obstacle led me a long way comes dashing up, and is startled neither by from my route, as I was obliged to ride a horse nor its rider. I have seen instances round it for several miles. where old animals continued to advance While I was riding close along this wall,

still hoping to find a free passage, I suddenly the grass is high also, and it is easy for the noticed a deer, about twenty yards off, poking hunter to creep unseen within shot, and its head out of the prickles, and staring at shoot the fattest deer through the head. me in surprise. I raised my rifle-Czar Even at the time of our visit, when the stopped instantly—and fired at the head, as leaves had fallen, these animals frequently I could not see any more of the deer. I reposed under the scattered trees, and rose could distinctly see through the smoke that as we passed, forty or fifty in number, the bullet smashed the right side of the gazing anxiously at us. The buffalo, on deer's head, and heard it dash away a few the other hand, always remains in the sunyards, and then fall; but it was impossible shine, and seems able to endure the greatest to penetrate the prickly wall for this short heat, but also the greatest cold, before all distance, and reach the deer. The cactuses other quadrupeds. It marks its endless were here from sixteen to seventeen feet marches from north to south and from high, and so close together that I could not south to north by its skeletons, which bleach go a foot into them. Hence I was obliged for many a year in the sun. Now, when the to give up the deer, and was very glad on at grass was short, the whole surface in the length reaching a narrow glade which ran distance had a whitish tinge, which is prothrough the wood.

duced by these bones, out of which the Late at night I rode along the bank of a skulls rise like shining dots. For about a river, which I took for one of the western week we rode through such land, only here arms of Turkey Creek, and was forced to and there interrupted by small elevations, halt and pass the night here by the numerous and frequently suffered with our animals rocks that rose from the tall grass and ferns. from drought. The next morning I passed the spot where For about a week we marched through a I crossed the river with the unfortunate very pleasant country, and arrived at a rather Kreger by means of the trunk of the tree, and large river, which Tiger, one of our comat noon reached the camp where the storm pany (for in this new adventure I was no had treated us so ill. I now came again longer alone), stated to be the Brazos, and into my own hunting-grounds, where nearly which falls into the gulf to the eastward of every tree and shrub reminded me of a fine the Colorado. I had seen it before at San chase, and my desire for home and my faith. Felipe, and would not have recognized ity ful Trusty urged me on. I rode late into for there it moves sluggishly through a thickthe night, till I reached at ten o'clock a wooded bed of heavy clay, and has a dirty camping-place, where I and Czar had often red colour, while here it rolls merrily over stopped before.

rocks, and its crystal surface is covered wity a snow-white foam. From this point we proceeded to the north-west, as Tiger noticed

that we had gone a little too far east, and CHAPTER VIII.

would have much greater difficulty in cross

ing the rivers than farther west, where, We shall now give some account of the though the country is mountainous, the Rocky Mountains. We reached the open streams nearer their sources are smaller and plains, where only here and there an more frequent. The mountains were comisolated musquito-tree or a thickly foliaged posed of limestone, and contained exquisite elm offers a little shade on the boundless little valleys, where the vegetation was glowing surface, and the sky forms the already bursting into new life. All the horizon all around. To these single shady softer-wooded trees were budding, and the trees the deer and the antelopes fly in the flowers were springing up all over the midday heat, and lie down close together, prairies. We seemed to keep equal pace so that you may be always certain to find with the reawakening of the vegetable world game under these trees, so long as their northwards, and even to go faster than it. leaves are standing. At the same season On a warm day we had been riding with.

OCELOTS HUNTING.

were.

out a halt over desolate, stony hills, and induces them not to appear publicly as their were quite exhausted. When our tired and enemies. thirsty horses clambered up a barren height, We quickly advanced, and reached at a we suddenly looked down into a lovely rather early hour a valley, in which we found valley covered with fresh verdure, through grass and water, and chose our camp at a which a broad stream wound. The view spot where the stream ran close under a soon enlivened horse and rider, and we precipice; while on this side was a small merrily hurried down to the bank of the copse, in which we could fasten our cattle at stream. We had hardly reached it and ridden night. It was an almost circular kettle, enour horses in to let them quench their thirst, closed by steep limestone walls, which had when a long train of Indians appeared on an opening only on one side, through which the opposite height bordering the valley, and the bright stream flowed. The sun was came straight towards us. Tiger looked at sinking behind the lofty gray rocks and them for a moment, and told us to wait dyeing the dark-blue sky with a glowing here while he rode across to see who they tint which no artist would venture to repro

We dismounted, led our horses to- duce on his canvas. About midnight Trusty gether, and got our weapons in readiness. aroused us by his loud savage bark: he was Tiger galloped through the valley to the at the opening of the valley, and would not hill-side, down which the Indians were lie down again, but we could not discover coming, and checked his piebald at its foot. his motive, as it was quite dark. Tiger We saw him making signs from a distance to fancied, however, that the Kickapoos were the approaching horsemen, which were an- trying to steal some of our horses. When swered in the same way, and ere long the day broke and cast its first faint light over whole party pulled up around him. They the gray walls of the valley, I awoke and held a long consultation, and then rode to saw at the entrance a herd of deer appawards us, with Tiger at their head. They rently browsing down the stream. As it were Kickapoos out on a hunting expedition, was still rather dark, I hoped to be able and had recently left their villages on the to approach them behind the few leafless Platte, where they have settlements like the bushes that grew on the bank, as crawling Delawares, and their squaws and old men through the dewy grass was too fatiguing a grow crops and breed cattle.

job to be rewarded by a deer, especially as I had a long conversation with the chief, we still had a supply of game. in which Tiger played the interpreter, told I crept down the stream, and had got him the purpose of our journey, invited him within shot, when I made a forward leap in to visit me on the Leone next winter, and order to reach a rather thick bush, from asked him how far it was to the next water. which I could fire more conveniently. At He assured me that we should come to good the same instant the deer started apart in water and grass before the sun sank behind terror, and I saw that an ocelot had leaped the mountains, and so we parted, very glad on the back of one of them, which laid back to get away from the fellows, whose ap- its broad antlers and galloped down the pearance was anything but satisfactory stream, while a second cat followed it with The party consisted of about eighty men, long, high bounds. Two of the terrified twenty squaws, and a number of small chil. deer darted past me, but I did not fire, as I dren. They had already unpacked their felt an interest in watching the hunt of the horses and prepared their camp to halt two beasts of prey, which I followed as here, as we rode away from them over quickly as I could out of the valley. The the hills, and Tiger came up to me, say- deer ran about a mile down the stream, then ing, “ Kickapoo no good-two tongues.” I reared and fell over backwards, when the had heard before that these Indians were second cat also sprang on it, and hung on false, spiteful, and hostile to white men, and its neck. only. the advantage they derive from being The deer collected its last strength and on friendly terms with the United States tried to rise on its hind legs, but sank exhausted, and sent its plaintive cries echoing dead deer. All were up in our camp, as through the mountains. I crept, unseen by they had heard my shots, and John and the beasts of prey, within thirty yards of Königstein hurried towards me to see what the scene of battle, and shot the first, while I had killed. My clothes were as wet as if I missed the second, as it bolted, but sent I had been in the river, and I turned myself Trusty after it, and soon heard him at bay before our fire, while the others went out. lower down the stream. I soon reloaded with Jack to bring in the game. Higher and hurried after Trusty, who was barking north I did not come aeross these small round a small oak in which the ocelot had leopards, while farther south they are very sought shelter. I shot it down and dragged frequent. it up to the other, which was lying by the

HOW TO MAKE A MODEL WORKING LEOTARD,

SOM
TOME of my readers have no doubt seen simple construction, and with fair usage,

this highly amusing and interesting almost impossible to get out of order. And toy. To those who have not, I will en- now to explain the mode of working. The deavour to describe, first, what it is like; box containing the machinery is divided and afterwards, how it is to be made. into three parts, each being divided from

The principal part is not unlike, in shape the other by a thin partition of wood. The and size, to a cigar-box standing on its divisions at the top and bottom are both end ; this contains some machinery, which the same size; the one in the middle is consets in motion a figure supposed to re-siderably larger, and contains a wheel made present Leotard. The figure goes through somewhat similar to a water-wheel, which, a series of the most astounding and ec- however, is not worked by water, but by centric movements: first one leg rests on fine sand, which falls from the top division the bar or trapeze ; then both his legs into the buckets, or rather partitions of the are thrown high over his head ; then he wheel, and thus works it. performs a series of turns with both his

In the process of manufacture, the princiknees on the bar; then with both his feet; pal articles required will be a small box, some then with one leg, the other swinging about cardboard, some glue, a few pins, an old pair in the most absurd manner ; then he rests of scissors : the box should be about eleven himself preparatory to going through an- inches long by seven inches wide. The exact other course of similar movements--in fact, size is of course not necessary, but you should an almost endless variety of the most amus- procure one as near the dimensions given as ing and comic positions are gone through, possiblean old cigar-box would do capiwhich it is almost impossible for even the tally. If you cannot procure a box of the most serious 'spectator to witness without a required size, you must make one out of hearty laugh, and who must also wonder at some thin wood. Having procured our box, your ingenuity in making a machine to work the next thing to be done is to make the so cleverly and long by itself.

divisions; the first must be three inches Many of my readers may, no doubt, at across, the middle five inches across, and first think that the machinery is very com- the bottom one the same size as the top: plicated, and therefore difficult to make : you must now divide these with two pieces let me at once assure you it is of the most of thin wood. We must not, however, fix these permanently until the wheel is made ; prevents it from slipping or giving way. and here some little care and patience will Having fixed your axle securely, you must be required. Your wheel should be four make a hole for it in the front of your box, inches in diameter : to make it you must which you must take care to make not describe two circles of that size on a piece larger than is actually required for the free of cardboard, and then carefully cut them working of the parts. out with a pair of old scissors; these are We have the two partitions already made, the discs of your wheel, which you must but not fixed, as before we secure them we take care to make smooth round the edges. shall have to make a hole for the sand to The next thing to be done is to make the fall out of. This must be made a little to buckets, or rather compartments of the the left of the wheel ; the whole should be wheel; and great care will be required to get two inches long and three-quarters of an them all at equal distances, the best way to inch wide. That is of course considerably ensure which is to mark the places for them larger than will be required for the sand to on both your discs. There should be eight run out of; a part of it is, however, closed compartments, and therefore you will have with a trap-door that prevents the sand to mark eight divisions, to do which you from falling out, except through the proper must divide the discs, first into quarters, place. The reason of this is, that when all and then into half-quarters; the divisions your sand is run away from the top division must be made of cardboard, for which you you may turn your machine over, and the must cut out eight pieces, each one inch trap-door will give way and let the sand in, long by three-quarters of an inch wide. You and thus set your wheel in motion again. should fix these securely between your discs The trap-door must be made out of a piece with short pins, after which you must care- of leather, one end being tacked down fully go round the crevices and joints with either with small pins or tin tacks, thus liquid glue, using an old feather or brush; making it to open like a door. You must, this in order that no sand may get in be- however, leave about a quarter of an inch tween, and thus both escape and damage space at the end, in order to allow the reyour wheel. You have now the divisions of quired quantity of sand to run out to turn your wheel fixed, but as it now is, the sand your wheel. Having made your trap-door, would fall through them—the partitions you must make a small spout of cardboard want a bottom to each. These can be made from the spare space, in order to convey the out of cardboard, which you must securely sand, to the wheel; the bottom partition fix with glue at the bottom of each division- must have a trap-door and spout precisely you must be careful not to leave any crevice similar to the upper one, so that while the through which the sand might work. In machine is in motion, the sand falling down some places a little sealing-wax might be will enter the lower division by the trapfound useful; but if you can do without it, door, which, when you turn your machine I should not advise you to use any, as a over, prevents it from escaping, except quantity of it would be apt to overbalance through the spout. Thus, after the machine your wheel, having finished which to your stops through all the sand being run out of satisfaction, we will proceed to make its the upper division, you will merely have to axle, which goes through the front of the turn it over in order to set it in motion box and forms the bar on which our Leo- again. We must now fix the wheel, &c., tard works. The axle consists of a piece of and nail the back securely on; after which stout wire, which, if it were simply placed you must paste some brown paper round through the centre of your wheel, would be the edges, to prevent the sand from escapapt to slip and get loose ; to guard against ing through any corner or crevice. which we must first fix the axle in the centre Our machine is now all enclosed in the of an oblong piece of wood, and to receive box, only the end of the axle of the wheel which you must cut a square hole through projects through the front, and this forms, the centre of your wheel; this effectually as I before explained, the bar on which our

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