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STANDARD

FIFTH READEB

(FIB3T-0LASS STANDARD READER)
COSTAINIHO

i SUMMARY OF R'JLES FOR PRONUNCIATION AND ELOCUTIOH
NUMEROUS EXERCISES FOR READING AND RECITATION i
A NEW SYSTEM OF REFERENCES TO RULES
AND DEFINITIONS,

AND

A COPIOUS EXPLANATORY INDEX.
B Y

EPES SARGENT,

AOTUO* III "Mi NTAJDAUD SP1AK1R." ''TH1 STANDArD FOCETH BCABS1," MC

FIFTIETH THOUSAND.

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Now Ready.

8ARQENT8 COMPLETE SERIES 01 SCHOOL READERS.

The Standard Fifth, or First Class Reaneb.

The Standard Fourth Reader.

The Standard Third Reader.

The Standard Second Reader. (Illustrated)

The Standard First Reader. (Illustrated).

Also Ready: ,

Sargent's Six Primary School Charts.

These Charts aro twenty-two inches by thirty in she; got up in a new and attractive style, with large typo, for beginners in reading, &o.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year eighteen hundred and fifty-tour bj Epes Saecent, in the Clerk's Office ol the District Court of the Unite* SUMS, for lis District of Massachusetts

- Many of the single pieces in this collection are protected by the copyright

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"The evils of book-making," says Lord Bacon, "are only to be cured by making more books; that is, such as shall cause the bad ones to be forgotten." An objection to many of the reading exercises selected for schools is, that they either fall below the requirements of a sound literary taste, or are not of a character to be understood by those for whom they are intended. It is a narrow experience, I am aware, that would have a pupil read nothing that is not level to his comprehension— that would leave nothing for his mind to grow up to; but it is none the less true that he will best deliver what he best understands and feels.

To satisfy at once the mature taste of the teacher, and to interest the pupil, is the desirable object in the compilation of a "Reader ;" and let it not be supposed that this is any easy or irresponsible task, to be taken up lightly, and despatched hastily and superficially. I know of few literary undertakings that ought to be assumed with more ample preparation, or pursued with a more scrupulous regard to the purposes in view. The pieces that are read or declaimed at school probably exercise a more enduring influence upon the character, so far as it can be affected by the thoughts and forms of expression that literature embodies, than all that is read in after lifo. How important, then, that an active and accurate discrimination should bo oxer

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