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ity of space, and that space knows no termination. The conception is great and difficult, but the truth is unquestionable.

5 By a process of measurement which it is unnecessary at present to explain, we have ascertained first the distance and then the magnitude of some of those bodies which roll in the firmament; that the sun, which presents itself to the eye under so diminutive a form, is really a globe, exceeding, by many thousands of times, the dimensions of the earth which we inhabit; that the moon itself has the magnitude of a world; and that even a few of those stars, which appear like so many lucid points to the unassisted eye of the observer, expand into large circles upon the application of the telescope," and are some of them much larger than the ball which we tread upon, and to which we proudly apply the denomination of the universe.

6. Now, why should we think that the great Architect" of nature, supreme in wisdom as he is in power, would call these stately mansions into existence, and leave them unoccupied? When we cast our eye over the broad sea, and look at the country on the other side, we see nothing but the blue land stretching obscurely over the distant horizon. We are too far away to perceive the richness of its scenery, or to hear the sound of its population. Why not extend this principle to the still more distant parts of the universe? What though, from this remote point of observation, we can see nothing but the naked roundness of yon planetary orbs? Are we, therefore, to say that they are so many vast and unpeopled solitudes; that desolation reigns in every part of the universe but ours; that the whole energy of the divine attributes is expended on one insignificant corner of these mighty works, and that to this earth alone belongs the bloom of vegetation, or the blessedness of life, or the dignity of rational and immortal existence? Chalmers.

CV. — THOUGHTS ON EARLY RISING.
1. Habits Of Great Men.Anonymous.

Whatever may be the quantity of sleep required, early rising is essential to health, and promotes longevity." Almost all mec who have distinguished themselves in science," literature, and the arts, have been early risers. The industrious, the activeminded, the enthusiasts in pursuit of knowledge or gain, are up betimes at their respective occupations, while the sluggard wastes the most beautiful period of his life in pernicious slumber Homer, Virgil, and Horace, are all represented as early risers the same was the case with Paley, Priestley, and Buffon; th« last of whom ordered h.s servant to awaken him every morning, and compel him to get up by force if he evinced any reluctance; , for which service he was rewarded with a crown each day, which recompense he forfeited if he did not oblige his master to get out of bed before the clock struck six.

Bishops Jewel and Burnet rose every morning at four o'clock. Sir Thomas More did the same thing. Napoleon was an early riser; so were Frederick the Great, Charles the Twelfth, and Washington. Sir Walter Scott, during the greater part of his life, rose by five o'clock; and his literary work was accomplished chiefly before breakfast. Franklin and nearly all the great men of the American revolution were early risers; so were Daniel Webster and John Quincy Adams. That early rising tends to prolong life appears to be clearly proved. One of the most eminent judges of England — Lord Mansfield — was at the pains of collecting some curious evidence on this subject. When he presided in his judicial capacity over the court, he questioned every old person who appeared at the bar respecting his habits; and all agreed on one point—that of being early risers.

Falsely luxurious, will not man awake,
And, springing from the bed of sluth, enjoy
The cool, the fragrant, and the silent hour,
To meditation due and sacred song ? —
Wildered and tossing through distempered dreams,
Who would in such a gloomy state remain
Longer than nature craves, when every Muse
And every blooming pleasure wait without
To bless the wildly-devious morning walk?

2. The Morning Hour. Daniel Webster.

The air is tranquil, and its temperature mild. It is morning, and a morning sweet, and fresh, and delightful. Everybody knows the morning in its metaphor'ical" sense, applied to so many objects, and on so many occasions. The health, strength, and beauty, of early yearii, lead us to call that period the "morning of life." Of a lovely young woman we say, she is "bright as the morning," and no one doubts why Lucifer" is called the "son of the morning." But, the morning itself few people, inhabitants of cities, know anything about. Among all our good people, not one in a thousand sees the sun rise once a year. They know nothing99 of the morning.

Their idea of it is, that it is that part of the day which comes along after a cup of coflee and a beef-steak, or a pieoe of toast With them, morning is not a new issuing of light, a new bursting101 forth of the sun, a new waking up of all that has life, from a sort of temporary death, to behold again the works of God, the heavens and the earth; it is only part of the domestic day, belonging to breakfast, to reading the newspapers, answering notes, sending the children to school, and giving orders for dinner .fart Tikst -R-...^

1. Noon, by the north clock! Noon, by the east! High

noon, too, by these hot sunbeams, which fall, scarcely aslope, upon

W A .nyl qiirmgf make the water bubble and smoke in the ueautiiui aescripxions oi tne mormng uoounu in amsnguages,

but they are the strongest, perhaps, in those of the East, where

the sun is often an object of worship. King David speaks of

taking to himself the "wings of the morning." This is highly

poetical and beautiful. The wings of the morning are the beams

of the rising sun. Rays of light are wings. It is thus said that

the Sun of righteousness shall arise, "with healing in his wings,"

a rising sun which shall scatter life, health, and joy, throughout

the universe. Milton has fine descriptions of morning; but not

so many as Shakspeare, from whose writings pages of the most

beautiful im'agery, all founded on the glory of the morning,

might be filled.

I never thought that Adam had much the advantage of us, from having seen the world while it was new. The manifestations of the power of God, like his mercies, are " new every morning" and fresh every moment. We see as fine risings of the sun as ever Adam saw, and its risings are as much a miracle now as they were in his day, and I think a good deal more, because it is now a part of the miracle that for thousands and thousands of years he has come to his appointed time, without the variation of a millionth part of a second. Adam could not tell how this might be. I know the morning — I am acquainted with it, and I love it. I love it, fresh and sweet as it is, a daily new creation, breaking forth and calling all that have life, and breath, and being, to new adoration," new enjoyments, and new gratitude.

She Strikes Upon A Rock.

6. Five hundred souls in one instant of dread
Are hurried o'er the deck;
And fast the miserable ship
Becomes a lifeless wreck.
Iler keel hath struck on a hidden rock,
Her planks are torn asunder,

parley, they are surely lost. This is as true here. We should realize by act the words "awake! arise!" in as quick, as immediate a succession as they were uttered by the poet. The man Bho springs from his bed at once on waking is the only conqueror; he shakes off the heaviness91 of his chain, the cloudy ^WiiejjS-QlJua, sLvmheii itfeflfflfTSttf ofiiige Vs:maVter~t6 geYou? f bed before the clock struck six.

Bishops Jewel and Burnet rose every morning at four o'clock. Sir Thomas More did the same thing. Napoleon was an early quaff the first Sowings into our cup; the briskness, the spirit, tho sparkling liveliness, of the young day. The early-rising man has the same conscious comfort through the day as the prudent, thrifty householder has through life; he is beforehand with the world; he has laid up something in advance, and that of no ordinary worth, but an inestimable thing, the most precious of all treasures, — Time. He takes the day by the forelock; he drives it, instead of being driven, or, rather, dragged along by it For my whole life through, this difficulty of early rising has been a quicksand in my course. I have set my buoy" upon it at last; let others make their profit of my experience.

[graphic]

CVI. — THE SHIP.
Her Appearance By Moonlight.

l. It is the midnight hour : — the beauteous sea,

Calm as the cloudless heaven, the heaven discloses,
While many a sparkling star, in quiet glee,
Far down within the watery sky reposes.
The mighty moon, she sits above,
Encircled with a zone of love;
A zone of dim and tender light,
That makes her wakeful eye more bright;
She seems to shine witli a sunny ray,
And the night looks like a mellowed day. . j, - —1 1 - -, f

ing of life." Of a lovely young woman we say, she is "bright as the morning," and no one doubts why Lucifer" is called the "son of the morning." But, the morning itself few people, inhabitants of cities, know anything about. Among all our good people, not one iu a thousand sees the sun rise once a year. They know nothing98 of the morning.

Their idea of it is, that it is that part of the day which comes along after a cup of coffee and a beef-steak, or a piece of toast CVII. — A KILL FROM THE TOWN PUMP.

[SceneThe corner of two principal Streets. The Town Pump talk ing through its nose.]

Part First

1. Noon, by the north, clock! Noon, by the east! High noon, too, by these hot sunbeams, which fall, scarcely aslope, upon my head, and almost make the water bubble and smoke in the trough53 under my nose. Truly we public characters have a tough time of it! And among all the town officers, chosen at March meeting, where is he that sustains, for a single year, the burden of such manifold duties as are imposed, in perpetuity," upon the Town Pump? The title of " town treasurer " is right

i:„„ nf the hesijreasure that the town has.

Her Appearance At Sunrise.'

4. But, list! a low and moaning sound

At distance heard, like a spirit's song!
And now it reigns above, around,

As if it called the ship along.
The moon is sunk, and a clouded gray

Declares that her course is run,
And, like a god who brings the day,
Up mounts the glorious sun.
^ Soon as his light has warmed the seas,

From the parting cloud fresh blows the breeze. j And that is the spirit whose well-known song

I Makes the vessel to sail in joy along."

'for, all day long, 1 am seen aiTthe busiest corner, just above the market, stretching out my arms to rich and poor alike; and at night I hold a lantern over my head, both to show where I am and keep people out of the gutters.

Hut gently now the small waves glide
Like playful lambs o'er a mountain side.
So stately her bearing, so proud her array,
The main she will traverse for ever and aye.
Many ports will exult at the gleam of her mast!
Hush, hush, thou vain dreamer! this hour is her last

She Strikes Upon A Rock.

6. Five hundred souls in one instant of dread
Are hurried o'er the deck;
And fast the miserable ship
Becomes a lifeless wreck.
Her keel hath struck on a hidden rock,
Her planks are torn asunder,
SO

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