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me the same effect that indignation did upon Ju'vënal ; Et only instead of inspiring me to versify, it had enabled me to pro. nounce German; I perceived it in the submissive air with which the hostess took away the unfortunate sour-krout.

6. I remained, then, waiting my second service, amusing my. self meanwhile by making pellets out of the bread, or tasting, with many a shrugs and grimace', a kind of sour wine, which, because it had an abominable flavor of flint, and was contained in a long-necked bottle, was pleasantly called Hock. — “Well ?” said I, looking up.—“Well ?” returned the hostess. — “My supper!” -“0, yes ! ” — And she brought me again the sourkrout!

7. I made up my mind that unless I took summary justice upon it there would be no end to her persecutions. I therefore called a dog, - one of the Saint Bernard' breed, who lay toasting his nose and paws before the fire, and who, on rec'ognizing my good intentions, left the chimney, came to me, and with three jerks of the tongue lapped up the proffered food. “Well done, beast!” said I, when he had finished ; and I returned the empty plate to the hostess. — “ And you?” she said. “0! I will eat something else.” –“But I have n't anything else,” she replied.

8. “How !” cried I, from the very depths of my empty stomach; “have n't you some eggs?" -“None.” — “ Some cutlets ? ” — “ None." — "Some potatoes ?” -“ None." — “Some _ ” A luminous idea crossed my mind. I remembered that I had been advised not to pass through the place without tasting the mushrooms, for which, twenty leagues round, it is celebrated. But when I wished to avail myself of this felicitous recollection, an unforeseen difficulty presented itself in the fact that I could not, for the life of me, recall the German word, the pronunciation of which was essential, unless I would go hungry to bed. I remained, then, with open mouth, pausing at the indefinite pronoun. . 9. “Some — some-how do you call it in German? Some " - "Some?” repeated the hostess, mechanically. — "Eh? yes; some —" — At this moment my eyes fell upon my album, si " Wait,” said I, “ wait !” I then took my pencil,93 and, on a beautiful white leaf, drew, as carefully as I could, the precious vegetable which formed for the moment the object of my desires. I flattered myself that it approached as near to a resemblance as it is permitted for the work of man to reproduce the work of nature.

10. All this while the hostess followed me with her eyes, displaying an intelligent curiosity that seemed to augur most favorably for my prospects. “Ah! ja, ja, ja (yes, yes, yes),”

said she, as I gave the finishing touch to the drawing. She had comprehended — the clever woman !- so well comprehended, that, five minutes after, she entered the room with an umbrella all open. “There !” said she. I threw a glance upon my unfortunate drawing — the resemblance was perfect!

ORIGINAL TRANSLATION FROM DUMAS

LXXXI. — THE CAVERN BY THE SEA. 1. THERE is a cavern in the island of Hoonga, one of the Tonga islands, in the South Pacific Ocean, which can be entered only by diving into the sea, and has no other light than what is reflected from the bottom of the water. A young chief discovered it accidentally while diving after a turtle, and the use which he made of his discovery will probably be sung in more than one Europēan language, so beautifully is it adapted for a tale in verse.

2. There was a tyrannical governor at Văvaoo, against whom one of the chiefs formed a plan of insurrection ; it was betrayed, and the chief, with all his family and kin, was ordered to be destroyed. He had a beautiful daughter, betrothed to a chief of high rank, and she also was included in the sentence. The youth who had found the cavern, and kept the secret to himself, loved this damsel ; he told her the dānger in time, and persuaded her to trust herself to him. They got into a canoe; the place of

her retreat was described to her on the way to it. These women person wno prings unese iroiu Dvivuil vaftnu him and rose in the evenings, range over the entire field of useful knowledge. Our common schools are important in the same way as the common air, the common sunshine, the common rain, invaluable for their commonness. They are the corner-stone of that municipal organization which is the characteristic feature of our social system; they are the fountain of that wide-spread intelligence, which, like a moral life, pervades the country. From the humblest vil. lage school there may go forth a teacher who, like Newton, shall bind his temples with the stars of Orion’ski belt, — with Herschel,Et light up his cell with the beams of before undiscov. ered planets, — with Franklin, grasp the lightning.

4. ON PAMPERING THE BODY AT THE Soul's EXPENSE. Everett. · What, sir! feed a child's body, and let his soul hunger ! pam. per his limbs, and starve his faculties! What! plant the earth

overboard, and, just as they were beginning to be seriously alarmed at his long disappearance, he rose with his mistress from the water. This story is not deficient in that which all such stories should have to be perfectly delightful, – a fortunate conclusion The party remained at the Fijis till the oppressor died, and then returned to Vavaoo, where they enjoyed a long and happy life. This is related as an authentic tradition.

LXXXII. — THOUGHTS ON EDUCATION. 1. AIR AND EXERCISE. — London Quarterly Review. SPECIAL attention should be given, both by parents and teach ers, to the physical development of the child. Pure air and free exercise are indispensable, and wherever either of these is withheld the consequences will be certain to extend themselves over the whole future life. The seeds of protracted and hopeless suffering have, in innumerable instances, been sown in the constitu tion40 of the child simply through ignorance of this great fundamental physical law; and the time has come when the united voices of these innocenti victims should ascend,“ trumpettongued,” to the ears of every pārent and every teacher in the land. “Give us froe air and wholesome exercise; give us leave to develop our expanding energies in accordance with the laws of our being; give us full scope for the elastic and bounding im. ulses of our youthful blood! wu wuLvi upon uimvuity presented itself in the fact that I could not, for the life of me, recall the German word, the pronunciation of which was essential, unless I would go hungry to bed. I remained, then, with open mouth, pausing at the indefinite pronoun. · 9. “Some-some-how do you call it in German? Some "

-“Some ? ” repeated the hostess, mechanically. — “Eh? yes ; some-" - At this moment my eyes fell upon my album. 51 – “ Wait,” said I, “ wait !” I then took my pencil,93 and, on a beautiful white leaf, drew, as carefully as I could, the precious vegetable which formed for the moment the object of my desires. I flattered myself that it approached as near to a resemblance as it is permitted for the work of man to reproduce the work of nature.

10. All this while the hostess followed me with her eyes, displaying an intelligent curiosity that seemed to augur most favorably for my prospects. “ Ah! ja, ja, ja (yes, yes, yes)," LXXXIII. — COLUMBUS AND HIS DISCOVERY. 1 In the last quarter of the fifteenth century, an Italian mariner, a citizen of the little republic of Gěn'oa,El who had hitherto gained a livelihood as a pilot in the commercial service of different countries, made his appearance successively at various courts in the south and west of Europe, soliciting patronage and aid for a bold and novelo1 project in navigation. The idea of reaching the East by a voyage around the African continent El had begun to assume consistency; but the vastly more significant idea, that the earth is a globe, and capable of being circumnavigated, had by no means become incorporated into the general intelligence of the age.

2. And thus to reach the East by sailing in a western direction, this was a conception which no human being is known to have formed before Columbus, Et and which he proposed to the governments of Italy, of Spain, of Portugal, and of England, and en lang time without success. The state of science was not

3. Our Common SCHOOLS. — Everett. They give the keys of knowledge to the mass of the people I think it may with truth be said, that the branches of knowledge taught in our common schools, when taught in a finished, masterly manner, — reading - in which I include the spelling of our language - a firm, sightly, legible hand-writing, and the elemental rules of arithmetic, — are of greater value than all the rest which is taught at school. I am far from saying that nothing else can be taught at our district schools; but the young person who brings these from school can himself, in his winter evenings, range over the entire field of useful knowledge. Our common schools are important in the same way as the common air, the common sunshine, the common rain,-invaluable for their commonness. They are the corner-stone of that municipal organization which is the characteristic feature of our social system; they are the fountain of that wide-spread intelligence, which, like a moral life, pervades the country. From the humblest vil. lage school there may go forth a teacher who, like Newton, shall bind his temples with the stars of Orion’ski belt, — with Herschel, Et light up his cell with the beams of before undiscov. ered planets, — with Franklin, grasp the lightning.

4. On PAMPERING THE BODY AT THE Soul's EXPENSE. — Everett. - What, sir! feed a child's body, and let his soul hunger ! pam. per his limbs, and starve his faculties! What! plant the earth

overboard, and, just as they were beginning to be seriously alarmed ut his long disappearance, he rose with his mistress from the water. This story is not deficient in that which all such stories should have to be perfectly delightful, - a fortunate conclusion The party remained at the Fijis till the oppressor died, and then returned to Vavaoo, where they enjoyed a long and happy life. This is related as an authentic tradition.

LXXXII. — THOUGHTS ON EDUCATION.

1. AIR AND EXERCISE. — London Quarterly Review. SPECIAL attention should be given, both by parents and teach ers, to the physical development of the child. Pure air and free exercise are indispensable, and wherever either of these is withheld the consequences will be certain to extend themselves over the whole future life. The seeds of protracted and hopeless suf. fering home ::

5. TRUE ESTIMATE OF THE TEACHER'S CALLING. — Channing. One of the surest signs of the regeneration of society will be, the elevation of the art of teaching to the highest rank in the community. When a people shall learn that its greatest bene. factors and most important members are men devoted to the liberal instruction of all its classes, - to the work of raising to life its buried40 intellect, - it will have opened to itself the path of true glory.

There is no office higher than that of a teacher of youth ; for there is nothing on earth so precious as the mind, soul, character, of the child. No office should be regarded with greater respect. The first minds in the community should be encouraged to assume it. Parents should do all but impoverish themselves, to induce such to become the guardians and guides of their children. To this good all their show and luxury should be sacrificed.

Here they should be lavish, whilst they straiten themselves in everything else. They should wear the cheapest clothes, live on the plainest food, if they can in no other way secure to their families the best instruction. They should have no anxiety to accumulate property for their children, provided they can place them under influences which will awaken their faculties, inspire them with pure and high principles, and fit them to bear a manly, useful, and honorable part in the world. No language can ex press the cruelty or folly of that economy, which, to leave a fortune to a child, starves his intellect, impoverishes his heart.

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