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The Students' Series of English Classics.

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O furnish the educational public with well edited editions of

those authors used in, or required for admission to many of the colleges, the publishers announce this new series. The following books are now ready :

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30 cts.

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Coleridge's Ancient Mariner,
A Ballad Book,

54 Edited by KATHARINE LEE BATES, Wellesley College. Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum,

30 Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration,

30 Edited by LOUISE MANNING HODGKINS, Wellesley College. Introduction to the Writings of John Ruskin,

54 Macaulay's Essay on Lord Clive,

42 Edited by VIDA D. SCUDDER, Wellesley College. George Eliot's Silas Marner,

42 Scott's Marmion,

42 Edited by MARY HARRIOTT NORRIS, Instructor, New York. Sir Roger de Coverley Papers from The Spectator,

42 Edited by A. S. ROE, Worcester, Mass. Macaulay's Second Essay on the Earl of Chatham, 42

Edited by W. W. CURTIS, High School, Pawtucket, R.I. Johnson's History of Rasselas,

42 Edited by FRED N. Scott, University of Michigan. We cannot speak too bigbly of the STUDENTS' SERIES OF ENGLISH CLAS. SICS. - The Christian Union.

Several others are in preparation, and all are substantially bound in cloth.

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LEACH, SHEWELL, & SANBORN, Publishers,

BOSTON, NEW YORK, and CHICAGO.

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“Nothing can be truer than fairy wisdom. It is as true as sunbeams."

DOUGLAS JERROLD.

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COPYRIGHT, 1889,
By LEACH, SHEWELL, & SANBORN.

C. J. PETERS & SON,
TYPOGRAPHERS AND ELECTROTYPERS,

145 HIGH STREET, BOSTON.

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PREFACE.

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On the list of entrance requirements in English literature, as recently adopted by the Association of New England Colleges, stands Coleridge's “ Ancient Mariner.” The selection is a happy one, for the reason that the poemsexquisite in melody and imagery, and abounding in nature-pictures equally remarkable for wide range and delicate accuracy, nevertheless produces at first so vivid an impression of spectral horror as to blind the casual reader to its rare poetic grace and charm. But as the poem is dwelt upon in the class-room, the student being brought to realize the marvellous succession of(moonlight, ocean scenes, then the agonies of that disordered soul and the frightfulness of the images reflected from its guilty consciousness will but serve to throw into fairer contrast the blessedness of the spirit restored to the life of love, and the peaceful beauty of the universe as beheld by eyes purged from selfishness and sin.

Coleridge at his best is so purely poetical that he is an especially valuable author for class-room use, his mastery of diction, melody and figure tending to culti

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