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In

A hey ** de couched in terms the sem

betur fer mvuld even breathing the
Ao

# public at- gratitude, paved the
enne resten abga trevor Notiglione and relentless as it w.
ti l tvoll upon a young woman The circle

and in white, and the frown with quaintance or
which he greeted her was of such oned. the most
durable severity that she hastilr resumed newly for
ber seat. Such was the first meeting be- nant of the
tween Madame Rammer and Vapoleon. combin
1 Ese perdus s capes of rears later, debte
when. Die Beast at the time about ranki

WOME-records of ye ad married, be. The
ARTHRE JUNNULLY Banture of the great- soia
A US D ie timer sid hesitated not

e n is tuuays in series of vehe.
mot vuur love letters, written in the

annur Rune Madame Récamier

outie her husband, who seems to
are poucet out the danger of coming to
* voeu rupture with a man in so infinen.

si a position as the brother of General
Bonaparte. and to have suggested the she
sufoption of some middle course betwe
00vouragement and total rejection. Thon
Lucieo withdrew disconfited, Made
Recamier continued to frequent his hou
sad shere it was that she once again en
countered the First Consul at a ball.
Dressed, as was her custom, entirely
white, with necklace and bracelets

to

is now

in terms the least offensive, and fields

Feathing the honeyed accents of one

ude, paved the way for persecution char

onless as it was petty.

re The circle of Madame Récamier's acan

maintance at this time embraced elements on se tull upon a frown

" the most diverse and discordant in the a newly formed society of Paris—the rem

nant of the old noblesse returned from exile,

coinbined with the new men who were in

ater. debted to talent and military glory for the ber seau des Base r ears later,

about rank to which they had recently attained. d be. Thus among those who frequented her

creat- soirées, were the Duc de Guignes, Barrére, sted not Lucien, Eugène Beauharnais, Fouché, of vehe. Bernadotte, Massena (who wore her white tten in the favor on his arm throughout the siege of

Recamier Genoa), Moreau, who had married her the seems to cousin, besides literary men such as M. de of coming to la Harpe- the French Quintilian—whose in so influen- lectures she attended at the Athenæum. or of General But amid the crowd of her admirers none

gested the shone more pre-eminent than Duke Macourse between thieu de Montmorency, who, upward of jection. Though twenty years later, represented France at

fited. Madame the congress of Verona, with whom an in. trennent his house, timacy was established which was only

once again en- terminated twenty-seven years later by the insul at a ball. touching and impressive death of the duke,

tom. entirely in who suddenly fell backward and expired uwand bracelets of while kneeling in the attitude of prayer in aniont of universal ad. church, Good Friday 1826. Ever devoted

i pou not come and and disinterested, he was fully alive to the

anded Napoleon, on danger to which Madame Récamier was We She replied that especially exposed, and his counsels pre**thorized, have pre- served her from many a youthful folly :

oh a liberty. “You but when Chateaubriand the monopolist aparte, “it was your took first place in her affections, he retired

somewhat into the background. 05. wbile Madame Réca. During the brief interval of the peace

t the Château de of Amiens (1802) Madame Récamier, rec

house near Paris, ommended to English society by introducClichy, her. nork stretched down to tions from one of her adorers, the veteran

". Eine, the Consul, mean- Duc de Guiche who had been ambassador *** Imperor, once more be- in England some thirty years before.

Tady with whose attrac- availed herself of the opportunity to visit so deeply impressed, and this country. The fame of her beauty and

it politic to form an al. fashion, of veils à l'Iphigénie harinonizing C orinating an opponent, or with the perfect oval of her face, and hair įstu as an ornament to his worn off one eyebrow à la Récamier, had

perhaps, as has been preceded her ; and when she appeared in le still viler, despatched Kensington Gardens with a companion,

Minister of Police, the “both in white, with white veils and vioof Nevers — strange let-colored parasols,” such was the curios. le-to urge upon Ma- ity and rudeness of the mob by which acceptance the post of they were hustled that the ladies were ter. je in result, however, ribly frightened and with difficulty regained nd a refusal, though their carriage. During this visit she sat

SU

miration. “Why did you not come
sit next me?demanded Napo
rising from the table. She repli.
she could not, unauthorized, have
sumed upon taking such a liberty. in
did wrong,said Bonaparte, “ it was vo
place.

In the year 1805, wbile Madam
mier was residing at the Château de
Clichy, her country house near Paria
whose beautiful park stretched
the banks of the Seine, the Consi
while become Emperor, oncem
thought him of the lady with who
tions he had been so deeply imor
whether deeming it politic to form an al.
liance with so fascinating an op
coveting her beauty as an ornamen
new-made court, or perhaps, asi
suggested, for ends still viler a
Fouché, the crafty Minister of Po
sarage proconsul of Nevers
bearer of a love tale-to urge
dame Recamier's acceptance the po
lady of honor. Futile in result. h
was this requisition, and a refusal, th

time

to Cosway for her portrait, perhaps the accommodation, however, which needed most faithful resemblance of her existing, the Emperor's sanction, was refused, the not even excepting the fine picture by bank stopped payment (1806), and at the Gérard, painter of kings and king of age of five-and-twenty, in the very zenith painters, in the gallery of the Louvre. of her beauty and power, Madame RécaChateaubriand assures us that her portrait, mier was suddenly deprived of the fabuengraved by Bartolozzi, was widely circu- lous luxury and splendor with which she lated in England, and was thence carried had hitherto been surrounded. But noto the isles of Greece, and Ballanche com- wise daunted, she met the disaster with menting on this circumstance remarked the same calm resolution as characterized " that it was beauty returning to the land her in the most trying events of her life. of its birth.”

Everything was surrendered to the creditArrived once more at home, Madame ors; plate, jewels, the bright accessories Recamier was present at the trial of her of the shrine wherein so inuch beauty had friend Moreau, implicated (thougb she be- sat enthroned ; all were sold, and Madame Jieved him wholly innocent of the accusa- Récamier retired with her husband to the tion) in the royalist conspiracy of Pichegru comparatively humble shelter of a small and George Cadoudal. Nothing could ex. apartment. But even thus, she became ceed the gloom and terror which reigned the object of universal interest and respect. at this period. Between the arrest and All Paris was at her door ; and Junot-commencement of the proceedings, terri. one of the warmest of her friends-on reble events were known to have occurred : joining his Imperial master in Germany, the Duc d'Enghien had been seized, and so far allowed his zeal to get the better of after a mock trial shot at dead of night his discretion as to expatiate for His Majbeneath his prison walls, and the spectre esty's delectation on the extent of symof Pichegru seemed as though it hovered pathy shown. “They could not have over the heads of the accused, for he had paid more honor to the widow of a Marbeen mysteriously strangled in his cell. shal of France who had lost her husband Madame Récamier was attended upon this on the field of battle," was the Emperor's occasion by a near relation of her husband, petulant reply. M. Brillat Savarin, a magistrate of gas. It was at this juncture that Madame de tronomic fame, and the moment she raised Staël (exiled from Paris in 1803), becomher veil, Moreau recognized her, rose and ing aware of her friend's einbarı assed pobowed to her, and she returned his saluta- sition, invited her to Coppet, a delightful tion, as she expresses it “ with emotion residence which she occupied near the lake and respect.” But this interview—if of Geneva. Incidents such as charactersuch it may be called—was to be the last ; ized her whole career awaited her here it was deemed wiser that she should not also, and a new personage makes his apagain attend the proceedings of the court, pearance upon the scene of her triumphs, for Napoleon was displeased by her ap- in the shape of Prince Augustus of Pruspearance, exclaiming sharply, when he sia, who had been taken prisoner at the heard that she had been present, “ What battle of Saalfeld (Oct. 1806), where his was Madame Récamier doing there?” eldest brother, Prince Louis, was killed.

Hitherto we have followed the fortunes Handsome, brave, chivalrous, and only of Juliette Recamier floating along the twenty-four years of age, the young prince flood-tide of success, but for her, as for at once fell a victim to the charms of the others, were appointed times if anxiety fair inmate of Coppet, implored her to and suffering, as well as scenes of triumph obtain a divorce and to inarry hiin. and rejoicing, and she was erelong to dis. Touched, it may well have been, by the cover that the power whose stability she devotion of royalty under misfortune, and had been somewhat too prone to depreci- influenced, perhaps, by the favoring counate, could on occasion be employed to do sel of her hostess, Madame Récamier yield. the bidding of passions the most petty and ed a somewhat hesitating consent, and unworthy. Her husband's banking house even wrote to her husband proposing the having become embarrassed, it was neces- formal dissolution of their marriage. M. sary to apply to the bank of France for Récamier professed his willingness to acthe loan of a million of francs, by which cede to her wishes, but appealed at the the difficulty could be tided over. The same time to her better feelings, and to means escaped the ears of the hero of the couched in terms the least offensive, and day. Turning to see what object could even breathing the honeyed accents of possibly have served to divert public at- gratitude, paved the way for persecution tention from the victor of Castiglione and relentless as it was petty. Rivoli, his eye fell upon a young woman The circle of Madame Récamier's acdressed in white ; and the frown with quaintance at this time embraced elements which he greeted her was of such unen- the most diverse and discordant in the durable severity that she hastily resumed newly formed society of Paris—the rem. her seat. Such was the first meeting be- nant of the old noblesse returned from exile, tween Madame Récamier and Napoleon. combined with the new men who were inIt was perhaps a couple of years later, debted to talent and military glory for the when Lucien Bonaparte, at the time about rank to which they had recently attained. twenty-four years of age and married, be. Thus among those who frequented her came passionately enainored of the great- soirées, were the Duc de Guignes, Barrére, est beauty of the time, and hesitated not Lucien, Eugène Beauharnais, Fouché, to express his feelings in a series of vehe. Bernadotte, Massena (who wore her white ment and vulgar love letters, written in the favor on his arm throughout the siege of character of Romeo. Madame Récamier Genoa), Moreau, who had married her appealed to her husband, who seems to cousin, besides literary men such as M. de have pointed out the danger of coming to la Harpe—the French Quintilian—whose an open rupture with a man in so influen- lectures she attended at the Athenæum. tial à position as the brother of General But amid the crowd of her admirers none Bonaparte, and to have suggested the shone more pre-eminent than Duke Maadoption of some middle course between thieu de Montmorency, who, upward of encouragement and total rejection. Though twenty years later, represented France at Lucien withdrew discomfited, Madame the congress of Verona, with whom an inRécamier continued to frequent his house, timacy was established which was only and there it was that she once again en terminated twenty-seven years later by the countered the First Consul at a ball. touching and impressive death of the duke, Dressed, as was her custom, entirely in who suddenly fell backward and expired white, with necklace and bracelets of while kneeling in the attitude of prayer in pearls, she was the object of universal ad. church, Good Friday 1826. Ever devoted miration. “Why did you not come and and disinterested, he was fully alive to the sit next me ?" demanded Napoleon, on danger to which Madame Récamier was rising from the table. She replied that especially exposed, and his counsels preshe could not, unauthorized, have pre- served her from many a youthful folly : sumed upon taking such a liberty. “You but when Chateaubriand the monopolist did wrong,'' said Bonaparte, “it was your took first place in her affections, he retired

somewhat into the background. In the year 1805, while Madame Réca. During the brief interval of the peace mier was residing at the Château de of Amiens (1802) Madame Récamier, recClichy, her country house near Paris, ommended to English society by introducwhose beautiful park stretched down to tions from one of her adorers, the veteran the banks of the Seine, the Consul, mean- Duc de Guiche who had been ambassador while become Emperor, once more be- in England some thirty years before, thought him of the lady with whose attrac- availed herself of the opportunity to visit tions he had been so deeply impressed, and this country. The fame of her beauty and whether deeming it politic to form an alfashion, of veils à l'Iphigénie harmonizing liance with so fascinating an opponent, or with the perfect oval of her face, and hair coveting her beauty as an ornament to his worn off one eyebrow à la Récamier, had new-made court, or perhaps, as has been preceded her; and when she appeared in suggested, for ends still viler, despatched Kensington Gardens with a companion, Fouché, the crafty Minister of Police, the “both in white, with white veils and viosavage proconsul of Nevers — strange let-colored parasols," such was the curiosbearer of a love tale—to urge upon Ma. ity and rudeness of the mob by which dame Récamier's acceptance the post of they were hustled that the ladies were terlady of honor. Futile in result, however, ribly frightened and with difficulty regained was tbis requisition, and a refusal, though their carriage. During this visit she sat

place."

to Cosway for her portrait, perhaps the accommodation, however, which needed most faithful resemblance of her existing, the Emperor's sanction, was refused, the not even excepting the fine picture by bank stopped payment (1806), and at the Gérard, painter of kings and king of age of five-and-twenty, in the very zenith painters, in the gallery of the Louvre. of her beauty and power, Madame RécaChateaubriand assures us that her portrait, mier was suddenly deprived of the fabuengraved by Bartolozzi, was widely circu- lous luxury and splendor with which she lated in England, and was thence carried had hitherto been surrounded. But noto the isles of Greece, and Ballanche com- wise daunted, she met the disaster with menting on this circumstance remarked the same calm resolution as characterized " that it was beauty returning to the land ber in the most trying events of her life. of its birth.”

Everything was surrendered to the credit. Arrived once more at home, Madame ors ; plate, jewels, the bright accessories Recamier was present at the trial of her of the shrine wherein so inuch beauty had friend Moreau, implicated (thougb she be- sat enthroned ; all were sold, and Madame lieved him wholly innocent of the accusa- Récamier retired with her husband to the tion) in the royalist conspiracy of Pichegru comparatively humble shelter of a small and George Cadoudal. Nothing could ex. apaitinent. But even thus, she became ceed the gloom and terror which reigned the object of universal interest and respect. at this period. Between the arrest and All Paris was at her door ; and Junot-commencement of the proceedings, terri. one of the warmest of her friends-on re. ble events were known to have occurred : joining his Imperial master in Germany, the Duc d'Enghien had been seized, and so far allowed his zeal to get the better of after a mock trial shot at dead of night his discretion as to expatiate for His Majbeneath his prison walls, and the spectre esty's delectation on the extent of symof Pichegru seemed as though it hovered pathy shown. “They could not have over the heads of the accused, for he had paid more honor to the widow of a Marheen mysteriously strangled in his cell. shal of France who had lost her husband Madame Récamier was attended upon this on the field of battle," was the Emperor's occasion by a near relation of her husband, petulant reply. M. Brillat Savarin, a magistrate of gas. It was at this juncture that Madame de tronomic faine, and the moinent she raised Staël (exiled from Paris in 1803), becomher veil, Moreau recognized her, rose and ing aware of her friend's einbarrassed pobowed to her, and she returned his saluta- sition, invited her to Coppet, a delightful tion, as she expresses it “ with emotion residence which she occupied near the lake and respect." But this interview-if of Geneva. Incidents such as charactersuch it may be called—was to be the last ; ized her whole career awaited her here it was deemed wiser that she should not also, and a new personage makes his apagain attend the proceedings of the court, pearance upon the scene of her triumphs, for Napoleon was displeased by her ap- in the shape of Prince Augustus of Pruspearance, exclaiming sharply, when he sia, who had been taken prisoner at the heard that she had been present, “ What battle of Saalfeld (Oct. 1806), where his was Madame Récamier doing there ?!? eldest brother, Prince Louis, was killed.

Hitherto we have followed the fortunes Handsome, brave, chivalrous, and only of Juliette Recamier floating along the twenty-four years of age, the young prince flood-tide of success, but for her, as for at once fell a victim to the charms of the others, were appointed times if anxiety fair inmate of Coppet, implored her to and suffering, as well as scenes of triumph obtain a divorce and to inarry him. and rejoicing, and she was erelong to dis- Touched, it may well have been, by the cover that the power whose stability she devotion of royalty under misfortune, and had been somewhat too prone to depreci- influenced, perhaps, by the favoring counate, could on occasion be employed to do sel of her hostess, Madame Récamier yield. the bidding of passions the most petty and ed a somewhat hesitating consent, and unworthy. Her husband's banking house even wrote to her husband proposing the having become embarrassed, it was neces- formal dissolution of their marriage. M. sary to apply to the bank of France for Récamier professed his willingness to acthe loan of a million of francs, by which cede to her wishes, but appealed at the the difficulty could be tided over. The same time to her better feelings, and to the memory of days gone by, ere misfor- to necessitate the removal of a portion of tune had fallen upon his house. The re- the jaw-bone ; and yet it was impossible monstrance was not without its effect, the for any one to be much in his society withreinembrance of all her husband's indul. out being attracted by the charm of his gence came back upon her, Catholic scruples conversation and manner. An episode of and dread of quitting her country did the the first interview between Madame Récarest; the glamour which had been tempo- mier and M. Ballanche seems prophetic of rarily cast over her imagination passed the nature of their whole subsequent inaway, and the lady returned to Paris in tercourse. Exerting himself to the very order to avoid the fulfilment of her prom- utmost to prove agreeable, M. Ballanche ise. Yet, strange to say, the prince was observed the lady turn pale, and on asking not informed of her resolution ; she trust- the reason, Madame Récamier, who was ed that time and absence--those two po- on the point of fainting, confessed the tent factors in assuaging the pangs of un- cause of her indisposition. Poor Ballanche requited affection—would render less pain- had caused his shoes to be new blacked in ful the destruction of his hopes ; nor was honor of the interview and the odor was it until three or four years later, when, insupportable to her. Without a word tortured by anxieties, both public and pri- he quietly withdrew, deposited the offendvate, he fell dangerously ill, that she sum- ing shoes outside the door, re-entered the moned courage to give the coup de grâce room as though nothing had happened and to his expectations. Meanwhile, she had resumed the conversation exactly where he sent him her portrait, which was the left it. Of the three whose names are brightest ornament of his home at Berlin most intimately associated as friends of until its return to Madame Récamier in ac Madame Récamier, the palm for sincerity cordance with his last wishes in 1845, and and devotion must be yielded to M. Bal. presented him with a ring, which, at his lanche. The Duke de Montmorency, earnest desire, was buried with him. Al- shocked at her love of dissipation, was albeit thus discomfited, Prince Augustus ways trying to convert her, but Ballanche continued to correspond with Madame thought she was perfect and loved all whom Récamier till the year 1815, when he en- she loved, not even excepting Chateautered Paris with the allied armies, at the briand with his egotism and vanity. head of the Prussian artillery, and his last “You are my star of destiny,” he writes interview with her took place as late as to her, “ it is impossible that I should sur1825, when he found her in her retreat at vive you ; were you to enter your tomb of the Abbaye-aux-bois.

white marble, a grave must be dug at unce The penalty of exile which Madame for me, wherein I also may be laid.” Récamier now incurred for no other crime Ballanche died 1847 and was buried in the than that of paying a thirty-six hours' visit same tomb which was two years later to to Madame de Staël-the entire edition of receive all that was mortal of Madame Réwhose celebrated work on Germany, which camier. She was then old and blind, and abounded with allusions to the Imperial in her anxiety to soothe his dying mopolice, had been seized, and who was con- ments, neglected precautions recommendtemplating departure to America -though ed to her after an operation just performed it involved no more than prohibition to re- upon her eyes, and with the food of tears side within one hundred and twenty miles which she shed by his couch was lost forof Paris, may be regarded as the crowning ever all hope of recovering her sight. act of Napoleon's revenge. She fixed upon At the time when Madame Récamier Châlons as her place of exile, subsequently visited Rome in 1813, the capital of the removing to Lyons where she made the Christian world was bereft of its Pontiff acquaintance of M. Ballanche, who, from and was simply the headquarters of a the first day that he inet her, became her French prefect who administered the de. abject slave. He was the son of a printer, partment of the Tiber. She opened her and more favored by gifts of intellect than salon in the Palazzo Fiano, where among by external advantages. He was in fact others she received Canova, who almost extremely ugly, and his ugliness had been by stealth transferred her bust to marble, aggravated by the unskilled treatment of and whose brother the abbé penned a daily a charlatan, who had used such violent sonnet to la bellissima Zulièta. From means for the cure of chronic headache as Rome she proceeded to Naples, where she

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