Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship and Travels: From the German of Goethe, Том 2

Передняя обложка
Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1851
 

Отзывы - Написать отзыв

Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва.

Избранные страницы

Другие издания - Просмотреть все

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения

Популярные отрывки

Стр. 311 - ... is regarded among us. With the reverence to which a man should give dominion in his mind, he can, in paying honour, keep his own honour; he is not disunited with himself as in the former case. The Religion, which depends on Reverence for what is Above us, we denominate the Ethnic; it is the Religion of the Nations, and the first happy deliverance from a degrading fear; all Heathen religions, as we call them, are of this sort, whatsoever names they may bear. The Second Religion, which founds itself...
Стр. 384 - As all Nature's thousand changes But one changeless God proclaim, So in Art's wide kingdoms ranges One sole meaning, still the same : This is Truth, eternal Reason, Which from Beauty takes its dress, And, serene through time and season, Stands for aye in loveliness.
Стр. 121 - I augur better of a child, a youth who is wandering astray on a path of his own, than of many who are walking aright upon paths which are not theirs. If the former, either by themselves, or by the guidance of others, ever find the right path, that is to say, the path which suits their nature, they will never leave it ; while the latter are in danger every moment of shaking off a foreign yoke, and abandoning themselves to unrestricted license.
Стр. 311 - But what a task was it, not only to be patient with the Earth, and let it lie beneath us, we appealing to a higher birthplace...
Стр. 311 - Religion that grounds itself on fear,' said they, ' is regarded among us. "With the reverence to which a man should give dominion in his mind, he can, in paying honor, keep his own honor ; he is not disunited with himself as in the former case. The Religion which depends on Reverence for what is Above us, we denominate the Ethnic ; it is the Religion of the Nations, and the first happy deliverance from a degrading fear : all Heathen religions, as we call them, are of this sort, whatsoever names they...
Стр. 94 - ... with symbols only, is a pedant, a hypocrite, or a bungler. There are many such, and they like to be together. Their babbling detains the scholar: their obstinate mediocrity vexes even the best. The instruction which the true artist gives us, opens the mind ; for where words fail him, deeds speak. The true scholar learns from the known to unfold the unknown, and approaches more and more to being a master. "Enough!" cried the Abbe ; " the rest in due time. Now, look round you among these cases.
Стр. 422 - It had been provided for already,' said she, ' by our ancestors. In the royal treasury lay a monstrous gold ring. I speak of it as it then appeared to me, when I saw it in my childhood : for it was this same ring, which I have here on my finger. We now went to work as follows : " ' I was informed of all that awaited me; and instructed what I had to do and to forbear. A splendid palace, after the pattern of my father's favourite summer-residence, was then got ready: a main edifice, wings, and whatever...
Стр. 309 - That posture, the arms crossed over the breast, the look turned joyfully toward heaven, that is what we have enjoined on young children ; requiring fro'm them thereby a testimony that there is a God above, who images and reveals himself in parents, teachers, superiors.
Стр. 303 - Felix obeyed, but soon cried: 'This is not much to my taste; I see nothing up there: does it last long? But yes !' exclaimed he joyfully, 'yonder are a pair of falcons flying from the west to the east ; that is a good sign too 1' — ' As thou takest it, as thou behavest,' said the other : 'Now mingle among them as they mingle.
Стр. 423 - ... box beside me, which I forthwith lifted, and carried off with me, not without a pleasant feeling in being so tall and strong. Still, indeed, a dwarf to trees and mountains, to streams, and tracts of land, yet a giant to grass and herbs, and, above all, to ants, from whom we dwarfs, not being always on the best terms with them, often suffer considerable annoyance. " ' How it fared with me on my pilgrimage, I might tell thee at great length. Suffice it to say I tried many, but no one save thou...

Библиографические данные